The White House(CAMDEN, N.J.) — Discussing his new executive action to limit certain types of military-style gear for local law enforcement, President Obama said on Monday the new restrictions prohibit gear that is “made for the battlefield” — and not America’s communities.

“We’ve seen how militarized gear can sometimes give people a feeling like there’s an occupying force as opposed to a force that’s part of the community that’s protecting them and serving them,” Obama told an audience in Camden, New Jersey, one of the poorest and most dangerous cities in America.

“We’re going to prohibit some equipment made for the battlefield that is not appropriate for local police departments,” Obama said, qualifying that some types of military-style gear will still be available to police when they are properly trained to operate it.

The president praised the community-policing work of the Camden Police Department as a role model for law enforcement across the country can build trust with communities through a sustained presence while simultaneously lowering crime rates.

“If it’s working here, it can work anywhere,” Obama said.

But addressing the challenges that face communities like Camden, Obama noted, goes beyond effective policing.

He said and other systemic problems affecting the nation’s poorest communities must be addressed on a societal level.

“If we as a society aren’t willing to deal honestly with issues of race, then we can’t just expect police departments to solve these problems,” Obama said. “If communities are being isolated and segregated without opportunity and without opportunity and without jobs, if we politicians are simply ramping up long sentences on non-violent drug crimes that end up devastating communities, we can’t ask the police to solve the problem when there are no able bodied men in the community or kids are growing up without intact households.”

“Communities, like some poor communities in Camden or my hometown of Chicago, they’re part of America too,” Obama said, making a plea for the nation to invest in the futures of children growing up in impoverished communities.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The White House is calling the fall of the Iraqi city of Ramadi an undeniable setback.

“There’s no denying that this is indeed a setback, but there is also no denying that we will help the Iraqis take back Ramadi,” Deputy Press Secretary Eric Schultz told reporters aboard Air Force One on Monday.

Schultz said the president is being kept up-to-date on the situation and that the U.S. military will provide assistance – specifically in the form of airstrikes – until Ramadi is recaptured by the Iraqi government.

“Our aircraft are in the air right now and searching for ISIL targets,” Schultz said. “They will continue to do so until Ramadi is retaken. In fact, we have conducted 38 air strikes in the last 3 weeks, including 8 over the last 24 hours.”

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NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images(PHILADELPHIA) — On his way to Camden, N.J., on Monday, President Obama briefly huddled with Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter and a handful of other political and community leaders on the tarmac of Philadelphia International Airport to discuss last week’s Amtrak crash.

Obama met with Nutter, Sen. Bob Casey, Philadelphia Police Commissioner Chuck Ramsey, Philadelphia Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer, Philadelphia Chief of Staff and Deputy Mayor of Public Safety Everett Gillison, and Philadelphia Director of Emergency Management Samantha Phillips.

The president is flying in and out of the Philadelphia airport Monday. He is not expected to stop at the crash site.

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Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — The White House is banning certain types of military-style equipment for local law enforcement.

The surprise announcement comes after the White House signaled last year that such equipment would remain accessible to local police departments, despite criticisms that the police response to protests over the killing of black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri were over-militarized.

But an interagency task force has since concluded that the risk of such military-style equipment being misused and violating community trust outweighs the advantages it offers in maintaining public peace.

The new list of banned equipment includes tracked armored vehicles, weaponized aircraft and vehicles, bayonets, grenade launchers, and large-caliber firearms.

The announcement comes on the same day that the president will travel to Camden, New Jersey — one of the nation’s poorest and most dangerous cities — to highlight efforts his administration is making to build trust between communities and local law enforcement.

Some military-style equipment — including armored vehicles, tactical vehicles, riot gear, and specialized firearms and ammunition – will remain accessible to law enforcement under new strict controls.

The president is also set to release a “blueprint” for effective community policing and an initiative to make more police data regarding use of force available to the public among other things to build trust between communities and law enforcement.

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ABC News/Twitter(WASHINGTON) — Say goodbye to those White House tweets signed – “BO.”

From now on, whenever President Obama personally tweets, it will be from his newly-launched @POTUS account. Only the president, himself, will tweet from this account, the White House advises.

Obama is “committed to making his Administration the most open and participatory in history,” giving Americans a new way to engage on the issues that are most important to them, the White House said in a statement.

The president’s account has already been verified by Twitter.

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Stockbyte/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Amid continued tension between police and communities of color, President Obama will travel to Camden, New Jersey this afternoon to highlight the city’s efforts improve police-community relations.

In cities like Camden, “for too long, both jobs and hope have been hard to find. That sense of unfairness and powerlessness has helped to fuel the kind of unrest we’ve seen in Ferguson and Baltimore and New York and other cities across our country,” White House senior advisor Valerie Jarrett told reporters. “It has many causes, from a basic lack of opportunity to folks feeling unfairly targeted by the police.”

But Camden – recently named a “promise zone” and a My Brother’s Keeper community challenge partner – is making strides, and the Obama administration wants to help other cities follow suit.

Here are six things they’re doing to shore up trust between law enforcement and minority communities:

1. Confidence ‘Blueprint’

After months of study by the president’s task force on 21st century policing, administration today is releasing its final “blueprint” for building trust between officers and the communities they serve.

“I can tell you, there is widespread understanding by the police that police- community relations must be improved, especially in communities of color,” Ron Davis, a former police chief who now heads the Justice Department’s COPS Office told reporters.

“We are without a doubt sitting at a defining moment in American policing,” Davis said. “We have a unique opportunity to redefine policing in our democracy, to ensure that public safety is more than the absence of crime, that it must also include the presence of justice.”

2. Data, Data, Data.

Statisticians, get ready: the White House has also launched a police data initiative designed to increase transparency and identify problematic trends.

According to officials, 21 jurisdictions have committed to release 101 data sets not previously accessible to the public, like reports on use of force, pedestrian and vehicle stops, and officer-involved shootings. (The administration’s “open data playbook” will set out best practices for other jurisdictions that want to post data publicly).

“It’s equally important that we educate the community so they set the expectation for their agencies to follow those practices and not just leave it up to the police department by itself,” Davis said yesterday.

Internal data will be shared with analysts who can, in the words of Domestic Policy Council Director Cecilia Munoz, “identify patterns to prevent problems or problematic behaviors before they lead to a crisis situation.”

3. $163 Million

The Justice Department Monday is announcing $163 million in hiring grants for positions focused on building community trust.

4. Virtual Body Cam Toolkit

In the wake of the Ferguson protests last year, President Obama pledged $75 million to buy 50,000 body cameras.

On Monday, the Justice Department is launching a web-based “toolkit” laying out best practices for hardware, software, and data storage, as well as dealing with public information requests, civilian privacy issues, and officers’ rights issues.

5. Bayonets, Be Gone

To curb the “militarization” of local police that upset so many people during the Ferguson protests, President Obama has authorized a series of recommendations to regulate the transfer of equipment from federal agencies to state/local law enforcement.

The plan divides equipment into two main categories: (1) “prohibited” equipment – including bayonets, grenade launchers, weaponized aircraft, tracked armored vehicles and large caliber weapons – that have been deemed inappropriate for local law enforcement and should not be made available local police “under any circumstances,” and (2) “controlled” equipment – including riot gear, explosives, armored vehicles, and specialized firearms – that police departments can acquire only if they comply with certain “vigorous” controls.

“The idea is to make sure that we strike a balance in providing the equipment which is appropriate and useful and important for local law agencies to keep the community safe, while at the same time putting standard in places,” Munoz said.

To obtain controlled equipment under these new recommendations, law enforcement agencies have to gain the consent of a local civilian governing body such as a mayor or city council and provide a “clear and persuasive explanation” for why the department needs the equipment. They’ll also be required to complete additional training in community and constitutional policing and collect data on how the equipment is used – particularly if it is involved in a “significant incident.”

6. National Community Policing Tour

Newly confirmed Attorney General Loretta Lynch is slated to travel to Cincinnati as part of a “national community policing tour.”

Lynch’s aides have indicated that one of her first priorities will be improving police morale and finding common ground between officers and minority communities.

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Richard Ellis/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — The number of Facebook interactions related to Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson were more than double those related to Sen. Rand Paul, whom he is competing against for the GOP nomination for president in 2016.

Facebook, which provided the approximated data to ABC News, defines interactions as posts, comments, likes and shares. The social network measured the interactions between May 6 and May 12 of this year. Carson formally declared a run for the White House just days before the measured time period.

The Kentucky senator garnered about 1 million interactions, while Carson, the pediatric neurosurgeon, achieved about 2.2 million. Other Republicans, including former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee all garnered fewer interactions than Carson as well.

On the other side of the aisle, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton achieved approximately 5.3 million interactions.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the vice chair of the Intelligence Committee, said the “picture perfect” raid that killed an ISIS leader this weekend in Syria is “the kind of one-two punch that we should do more of” to combat ISIS.

“I believe that if we’re not going to put troops on the ground, then we’ve got to use our Special Operations Forces to go in and collect intelligence; also be able to capture people that might be able to be helpful,” she said Sunday on ABC’s This Week.

Feinstein added that she is “very worried” about the Islamic State and its spread to at least 12 countries around North Africa and the Middle East.

According to U.S. officials, the Army’s elite Delta Force unit killed Tunisian Abu Sayyaf, a senior ISIS leader involved in the group’s illicit oil and gas trade, in an attempt to capture and interrogate Sayyaf about hostages and the terror group’s finances.

While Sayyaf was killed in the operation — fighting was so intense that hand-to-hand combat was involved, according to one U.S. official — American commandos successfully captured the ISIS leader’s wife, and rescued a Yazidi woman who appeared to be the couple’s slave, according to the National Security Council.

On the continuing strength of ISIS, Feinstein called the group “organized” and “an impressive fighting force.”

“It occupies territory. It runs a government. And most importantly it is evil. It annihilates in the most brutal of ways,” Feinstein said. “And so I think that we have to get very serious about what we’re going to do not only to contain but to eradicate this force.”

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the vice chair of the Intelligence Committee, said the “picture perfect” raid that killed an ISIS leader this weekend in Syria is “the kind of one-two punch that we should do more of” to combat ISIS.

“I believe that if we’re not going to put troops on the ground, then we’ve got to use our Special Operations Forces to go in and collect intelligence; also be able to capture people that might be able to be helpful,” she said Sunday on ABC’s This Week.

Feinstein added that she is “very worried” about the Islamic State and its spread to at least 12 countries around North Africa and the Middle East.

According to U.S. officials, the Army’s elite Delta Force unit killed Tunisian Abu Sayyaf, a senior ISIS leader involved in the group’s illicit oil and gas trade, in an attempt to capture and interrogate Sayyaf about hostages and the terror group’s finances.

While Sayyaf was killed in the operation — fighting was so intense that hand-to-hand combat was involved, according to one U.S. official — American commandos successfully captured the ISIS leader’s wife, and rescued a Yazidi woman who appeared to be the couple’s slave, according to the National Security Council.

On the continuing strength of ISIS, Feinstein called the group “organized” and “an impressive fighting force.”

“It occupies territory. It runs a government. And most importantly it is evil. It annihilates in the most brutal of ways,” Feinstein said. “And so I think that we have to get very serious about what we’re going to do not only to contain but to eradicate this force.”

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell underscored his support on Sunday for the controversial NSA program for bulk collection of domestic phone records, arguing it is essential to protecting the homeland.

“This has been a very important part of our effort to defend the homeland since 9/11,” McConnell said in an interview with George Stephanopoulos on ABC’s This Week. “We know that the terrorists overseas are trying to recruit people in our country to commit atrocities in our country.”

The PATRIOT Act, which provides the authority for the NSA collection program, is set to expire at the end of the month, but McConnell said he favors a short-term extension of the bulk data collection program.

That stance puts him at odds with the presidential candidate he’s supporting in 2016 — Sen. Rand Paul, whom the leader praised for embracing a “new brand of Republicanism.” But Paul has threatened to filibuster the reauthorization of the NSA program that McConnell supports.

“Rand Paul and I agree on most things. We don’t agree on this,” McConnell said. “We’re just in a different place on this. Reasonable people can differ.”

“Everybody threatens to filibuster. We’ll see what happens,” he said. “But we’re talking about the security of the country here. This is no small matter.”

The leader said he opposed a plan backed by the House of Representatives, that he said would effectively “end the program.”

“I don’t want us to go dark, in effect, and I’m afraid that the House-passed bill will basically be the end of the program and we will not able to have yet another tool that we need to combat this terrorist threat from overseas,” he said.

The Senate will not vote on the NSA legislation until after it completes work on a bill providing President Obama with the “fast-track” authority to strike deals on trade.

In a rare political moment this week, Senate Republicans found themselves aligned with the president on the trade issue, while Democrats handed him a resounding defeat by voting against moving forward with the measure. Later in the week, Senate Republicans and Democrats struck a deal to advance the trade bill, setting up votes on amendments for early this week.

“We’ll pass it later this week. The president’s done an excellent job on this,” McConnell said. “This is a trade promotion that is already not just for President Obama but for the next president as well. This is a six-year trade promotion authority bill that will give the next president an opportunity to enter into additional trade agreements with other countries around the world.

“The Senate’s getting back to work,” he said. “We’re trying to focus on the things we can agree on that can make progress for the country … even though we know there are many things we can’t agree with the president on.”

And as for the long awaited Bourbon Summit between McConnell and Obama?

“I’d be happy to do that, but we don’t have a personality problem, we’ve just had differences on issues,” McConnell said.

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