Photo Courtesy – Office of Governor Jay Nixon(FERGUSON, Mo.) — Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon spoke out publicly Thursday against the at-times violent clashes involving police officers and the public in the aftermath of the fatal police-involved shooting of Michael Brown.

Nixon pointedly noted that the right to peacefully protest needs to be respected, while insisting on a need for “safety so that people feel good and happy and safe about walking about their communities in all corners of our state.” Nixon made his statement after protests on Wednesday night turned violent, with police firing rubber bullets and using tear gas, while some protesters reportedly used Molotov cocktails.

Perhaps most notably, Nixon announced on Thursday that the street patrol in the city of Ferguson would be taken over by troopers from the Missouri Highway Patrol. Those troopers will be under the supervision of Capt. Ron Johnson, who grew up in the area.

“What’s gone on here over the last few days…is not what Missouri’s about, it’s not what Ferguson is about,” Nixon said.

The governor noted that residents of Ferguson have been clear, “they told me that they want a community that’s healthy and happy and safe. They want their streets to be free from intimidation and fear. They told me they want peace, they want truth — and they want to be treated with respect,” Nixon said. “My message to the people of Ferguson is that these voices have been heard.”

Nixon also said on Thursday that he would call on officials to publicly release the name of the officer involved in the shooting that left Brown, 18, dead, along with security to prevent additional acts of violence. “I think it would be…an important milestone here…to get that out as expeditiously as possible,” Nixon said.

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iStockphoto/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The Secret Service said it is “aware” of a photo that appeared to show an image of a flag of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in front of the White House.

If authentic, the photo showed a hand holding up an image of a flag for ISIS (also known as ISIL or Islamic State), displayed on a smartphone, on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House fence. That area, closed off to street traffic, is frequented by thousands of tourists every day.

It was tweeted from an apparently pro-ISIS Twitter handle @sunna_rev on Aug. 9.

“We have an intelligence division whose mission is to assess information that we receive every day for dangerousness or potential threat level,” Secret Service spokesman Ed Donovan told ABC News. “We are aware of the image and will take the necessary and appropriate follow-up steps.”

The Secret Service did not respond to an additional question about whether the tweet was believed to be authentic. The FBI has not yet responded to ABC News’ request for comment on the tweet, its suspected origin or whether it signifies a serious threat to the U.S.

A senior U.S. intelligence official told ABC that use of Twitter is consistent with ISIS practices. The group has shown to be at the forefront of social media use among terrorist and militant groups, the official said.

Another photo displayed a note handwritten in Arabic. It read, “Soldiers of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria will pass from here soon,” followed by a Koran verse that read, “and Allah is perfecting His Light even though the disbelievers hate (that).”

In the image, the note was dated June 20, 2014. It was unclear where the photo was taken, but two American flags appeared over an arched entryway.

“We are in your state / We are in your cities / We are in your streets,” the tweets read.

On Aug. 7, President Obama announced that the U.S. military would be conducting airstrikes against ISIS targets in northern Iraq, where the group has seized territory and is battling Kurdish forces not far from Erbil, where the U.S. military has set up a joint operations command center. ISIS has swiftly risen to control large swaths of Iraq and Syria after seizing weapons and reportedly selling oil to finance its war against Bashar al-Assad’s Syrian regime.

ISIS has issued threats against the U.S. homeland before. In a recent video series, Vice Media embedded with ISIS militants, and an ISIS militant told a Vice camera, “God willing, we will raise the flag of Allah in the White House.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Forbes may have rated Washington, D.C. the coolest city in the nation — but lawmakers off for the August recess often find more to love in their home districts than in Washington.

Sure, high-profile meetings with international leaders are fun to brag about at a dinner party. But when two of your constituents are Buzz and Woody — now that’s pretty cool.

Hanging w/ Buzz & Woody at @DisneyPixar. Thanks to employee & #ca15 constituent, Jeanette for the tour! pic.twitter.com/ypI0ONjjfz

— Rep. Eric Swalwell (@RepSwalwell) August 11, 2014

Of course, governing’s not all glitz and glamour. Sometimes you have to get your hands dirty — literally. Here’s what Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., did during his day-long stint as on Freund’s Farm:

One of my jobs was to shovel manure into the mixer. Insert snarky caption at will. pic.twitter.com/3zrVdc5hU9

— Chris Murphy (@ChrisMurphyCT) August 11, 2014

While Murphy shoveled manure, Rep. Bill Foster, D-Ill., ventured into high-tech:

Got to drive a robot at @MontgomeryIL Fest. Thanks to @oswego308 robotics clubs! #CongressScienceGuy #ScienceGeek pic.twitter.com/iAadV0eLry

— Bill Foster (@RepBillFoster) August 11, 2014

And Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., delved into arachnology. Meanwhile, animal-loving Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, threw a birthday bash for his puppies.

Rep. Illeanna Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., snuggled her brand-new grandbaby, and Rep. Hartzler celebrated her 30th wedding anniversary with a #TBT-worthy shot of her and her groom.

But if you thought members of Congress were all stodgy suits, think again. Some wear costumes, some don uniforms, and some ditch the shirt entirely. Other congressional fitness buffs kept their twelve packs under wraps. Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, who lost his mother to multiple myeloma, biked to raise money for cancer research.

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., angled to play catch on the Vikings practice field. And Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., scaled a rock wall.

Some lawmakers were not so healthy-minded. In fact, self-proclaimed chocaholic and House minority leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., served as a guest judge on TLC’s new pastry show, Next Great Baker.

And lest you think the August recess is all fun and games — former opthomologist Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., for example, “restored vision” to three pro-bono patients in his home district.

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The White House(EDGARTOWN, Mass.) — President Obama on Thursday said the military and humanitarian assistance to protect an Iraqi religious minority group under siege by a terrorist organization had been a success.

The airdrops delivered more than 114,000 meals and 35,000 gallons of fresh water to the Yadizis, Obama told reporters at a news conference during his vacation on Martha’s Vineyard.

The Yazidis faced “a terrible choice” — starve on the mountain or be killed by ISIS terrorists on the ground. “That’s when America came to help,” Obama said.

“The bottom line is: the situation on the mountain has greatly improved and Americans should be very proud of our efforts,” he said, adding, “I could not be prouder of the men and women of our military who carried out this humanitarian operation almost flawlessly.”

Following the advancement of the terrorist group ISIS toward the Iraqi city of Erbil, Obama last week authorized a series of targeted airstrikes, which he said successfully eliminated some munitions stockpiles and helped protect American interests from attacks.

The president has insisted that there is “no American military solution” to the crisis in Iraq and has promised not to send ground troops back into combat. It was “unlikely” that air drops would need to continue and assessment teams would leave Iraq “in the coming days,” he said Thursday.

Hopeful that marshaling international support to combat ISIS would be “easier” with the establishment of a new, more inclusive government, earlier this week, Obama lauded the naming of Iraq’s new prime minister designate and urged the Iraqi army and Kurdish peshmerga forces to take the lead moving forward.

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The White House(EDGARTOWN, Mass.) — President Obama on Thursday said the military and humanitarian assistance to protect an Iraqi religious minority group under siege by a terrorist organization had been a success.

The airdrops delivered more than 114,000 meals and 35,000 gallons of fresh water to the Yadizis, Obama told reporters at a news conference during his vacation on Martha’s Vineyard.

The Yazidis faced “a terrible choice” — starve on the mountain or be killed by ISIS terrorists on the ground. “That’s when America came to help,” Obama said.

“The bottom line is: the situation on the mountain has greatly improved and Americans should be very proud of our efforts,” he said, adding, “I could not be prouder of the men and women of our military who carried out this humanitarian operation almost flawlessly.”

Following the advancement of the terrorist group ISIS toward the Iraqi city of Erbil, Obama last week authorized a series of targeted airstrikes, which he said successfully eliminated some munitions stockpiles and helped protect American interests from attacks.

The president has insisted that there is “no American military solution” to the crisis in Iraq and has promised not to send ground troops back into combat. It was “unlikely” that air drops would need to continue and assessment teams would leave Iraq “in the coming days,” he said Thursday.

Hopeful that marshaling international support to combat ISIS would be “easier” with the establishment of a new, more inclusive government, earlier this week, Obama lauded the naming of Iraq’s new prime minister designate and urged the Iraqi army and Kurdish peshmerga forces to take the lead moving forward.

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Tom Pennington/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Sen. Rand Paul weighed in on the situation in Ferguson, Missouri and echoed Sen. Claire McCaskill’s call for demilitarizing the police in an op-ed published for TIME Thursday.

“Nowadays, police are looking, and acting, more like soldiers than cops, with bad consequences. And those who suffer the consequences are usually innocent civilians,” Paul, R-Ky., wrote.

Michael Brown, 18, was shot and killed by a police officer Saturday afternoon. Since then, unrest has roiled the city of Ferguson and the police department has been criticized for its heavily-armed response to protesters.

Many residents of the town are demanding a full, transparent investigation into why an officer fired multiple shots at an unarmed teenager.

“Given these developments, it is almost impossible for many Americans not to feel like their government is targeting them. Given the racial disparities in our criminal justice system, it is impossible for African-Americans not to feel like their government is particularly targeting them,” Paul wrote.

“The militarization of our law enforcement is due to an unprecedented expansion of government power in this realm. It is one thing for federal officials to work in conjunction with local authorities to reduce or solve crime. It is quite another for them to subsidize it,” he added.

Earlier on Thursday, McCaskill, D-Mo., issued a statement also calling for the demilitarization of law enforcement.

“We need to de-militarize this situation — this kind of response by the police has become the problem instead of the solution,” McCaskill said. “I obviously respect law enforcement’s work to provide public safety, but my constituents are allowed to have peaceful protests, and the police need to respect that right and protect that right. Today is going to be a new start, we can and need to do better.”

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ABC News(EDGARTOWN, Mass.) — Five days after the death of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old fatally shot by a local police officer, President Obama joined state and national leaders in calling for changes in how police are dealing with protesters in Ferguson, Missouri, amid continued street clashes.

“I know that emotions are raw right now in Ferguson,” Obama said at a news conference Thursday afternoon. “There is never excuse for violence against the police or for those who would use this tragedy as a cover for vandalism or looting. …There is also no excuse for police to use excessive force against peaceful protests or to throw protesters in jail.”

Obama’s comments came as the FBI confirmed to ABC News that it issued a warning to police officers that a Black Panther leader was trying to incite violence against law enforcement in Ferguson, a suburb of St. Louis.

Clashes between protesters and police continued Wednesday night, with reports of Molotov cocktails, tear gas and rubber bullets being used.

On Thursday, senior leaders began to call for what Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon dubbed, “a different tone.” Both Nixon and Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., said the police need to change how they handle the protests.

Nixon spoke to a group in a church hinting that a larger announcement will come later Thursday about “operational shifts.”

“We also need to allow folks who want to express their energy in an appropriate way that absolute right to do that because we will not get the healing that we all need if the only response from the public is, ‘Y’all just be quiet,'” Nixon said. “There is a certain level of emotion that needs to be expressed in order for us to reach a higher plane.”

As Obama spoke Thursday, New Black Panther members held a march in the St. Louis suburb, and other protests appeared likely.

The FBI previously issued a warning about the presence in the area of Chawn Kweli, who it identified as the chief of staff of the New Black Panther Party, Cheryl Mimura, a spokeswoman for the St. Louis FBI field office, told ABC News. The FBI alert was not publicly released but was circulated among law enforcement groups as an officer safety warning.

Obama on Thursday also spoke out against the arrests of two reporters by St. Louis police Wednesday night while working in a local McDonald’s.

“Police should not be bullying or arresting journalists who are just trying to do their jobs,” the president said.

Obama first addressed the issue on Tuesday when he released a statement saying that the Department of Justice was investigating Brown’s death alongside local officials.

“I know the events of the past few days have prompted strong passions, but as details unfold, I urge everyone in Ferguson, Missouri, and across the country, to remember this young man through reflection and understanding,” the president said Tuesday as he took time off from a vacation in Martha’s Vineyard.

“We should comfort each other and talk with one another in a way that heals, not in a way that wounds. Along with our prayers, that’s what Michael and his family, and our broader American community, deserve,” he continued.

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ABC News(EDGARTOWN, Mass.) — Five days after the death of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old fatally shot by a local police officer, President Obama joined state and national leaders in calling for changes in how police are dealing with protesters in Ferguson, Missouri, amid continued street clashes.

“I know that emotions are raw right now in Ferguson,” Obama said at a news conference Thursday afternoon. “There is never excuse for violence against the police or for those who would use this tragedy as a cover for vandalism or looting. …There is also no excuse for police to use excessive force against peaceful protests or to throw protesters in jail.”

Obama’s comments came as the FBI confirmed to ABC News that it issued a warning to police officers that a Black Panther leader was trying to incite violence against law enforcement in Ferguson, a suburb of St. Louis.

Clashes between protesters and police continued Wednesday night, with reports of Molotov cocktails, tear gas and rubber bullets being used.

On Thursday, senior leaders began to call for what Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon dubbed, “a different tone.” Both Nixon and Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., said the police need to change how they handle the protests.

Nixon spoke to a group in a church hinting that a larger announcement will come later Thursday about “operational shifts.”

“We also need to allow folks who want to express their energy in an appropriate way that absolute right to do that because we will not get the healing that we all need if the only response from the public is, ‘Y’all just be quiet,'” Nixon said. “There is a certain level of emotion that needs to be expressed in order for us to reach a higher plane.”

As Obama spoke Thursday, New Black Panther members held a march in the St. Louis suburb, and other protests appeared likely.

The FBI previously issued a warning about the presence in the area of Chawn Kweli, who it identified as the chief of staff of the New Black Panther Party, Cheryl Mimura, a spokeswoman for the St. Louis FBI field office, told ABC News. The FBI alert was not publicly released but was circulated among law enforcement groups as an officer safety warning.

Obama on Thursday also spoke out against the arrests of two reporters by St. Louis police Wednesday night while working in a local McDonald’s.

“Police should not be bullying or arresting journalists who are just trying to do their jobs,” the president said.

Obama first addressed the issue on Tuesday when he released a statement saying that the Department of Justice was investigating Brown’s death alongside local officials.

“I know the events of the past few days have prompted strong passions, but as details unfold, I urge everyone in Ferguson, Missouri, and across the country, to remember this young man through reflection and understanding,” the president said Tuesday as he took time off from a vacation in Martha’s Vineyard.

“We should comfort each other and talk with one another in a way that heals, not in a way that wounds. Along with our prayers, that’s what Michael and his family, and our broader American community, deserve,” he continued.

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ABC News(EDGARTOWN, Mass.) — Five days after the death of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18-year-old fatally shot by a local police officer, President Obama joined state and national leaders in calling for changes in how police are dealing with protesters in Ferguson, Missouri, amid continued street clashes.

“I know that emotions are raw right now in Ferguson,” Obama said at a news conference Thursday afternoon. “There is never excuse for violence against the police or for those who would use this tragedy as a cover for vandalism or looting. …There is also no excuse for police to use excessive force against peaceful protests or to throw protesters in jail.”

Obama’s comments came as the FBI confirmed to ABC News that it issued a warning to police officers that a Black Panther leader was trying to incite violence against law enforcement in Ferguson, a suburb of St. Louis.

Clashes between protesters and police continued Wednesday night, with reports of Molotov cocktails, tear gas and rubber bullets being used.

On Thursday, senior leaders began to call for what Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon dubbed, “a different tone.” Both Nixon and Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., said the police need to change how they handle the protests.

Nixon spoke to a group in a church hinting that a larger announcement will come later Thursday about “operational shifts.”

“We also need to allow folks who want to express their energy in an appropriate way that absolute right to do that because we will not get the healing that we all need if the only response from the public is, ‘Y’all just be quiet,'” Nixon said. “There is a certain level of emotion that needs to be expressed in order for us to reach a higher plane.”

As Obama spoke Thursday, New Black Panther members held a march in the St. Louis suburb, and other protests appeared likely.

The FBI previously issued a warning about the presence in the area of Chawn Kweli, who it identified as the chief of staff of the New Black Panther Party, Cheryl Mimura, a spokeswoman for the St. Louis FBI field office, told ABC News. The FBI alert was not publicly released but was circulated among law enforcement groups as an officer safety warning.

Obama on Thursday also spoke out against the arrests of two reporters by St. Louis police Wednesday night while working in a local McDonald’s.

“Police should not be bullying or arresting journalists who are just trying to do their jobs,” the president said.

Obama first addressed the issue on Tuesday when he released a statement saying that the Department of Justice was investigating Brown’s death alongside local officials.

“I know the events of the past few days have prompted strong passions, but as details unfold, I urge everyone in Ferguson, Missouri, and across the country, to remember this young man through reflection and understanding,” the president said Tuesday as he took time off from a vacation in Martha’s Vineyard.

“We should comfort each other and talk with one another in a way that heals, not in a way that wounds. Along with our prayers, that’s what Michael and his family, and our broader American community, deserve,” he continued.

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Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WILLINGBORO TOWNSHIP, N.J.) — President Obama is getting a building named after him in one New Jersey town.

The public building in Willingboro Township is currently called the Kennedy Center, after the late President John F. Kennedy. It houses the parks and recreation department, a senior center and other features.

However, since the building is undergoing a nearly $5 million renovation, supporters of the name change, including Deputy Mayor Jacqueline Jennings, believe it is fitting to pay tribute to Obama who helped spur voter registration in the town when he first ran for president.

The Willingboro Township Council this week voted in favor of renaming the building the President Barack Obama Center in spite of the objections of Mayor Eddie Campbell and the fact that it will still be located on John F. Kennedy Way.

Some local residents aren’t thrilled either. One wrote on the Burlington County Times Facebook page: “What’s next — naming malls after terrorists since he negotiates with them!! What a disgrace to America!!”

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