ABC News(COLUMBUS, Ohio) — Presidential candidate Donald Trump has over 10 times more support than John Kasich has in the polls, but the Ohio governor says he isn’t worried.

Kasich, who became the 16th candidate to enter the race for the Republican Party’s presidential nomination on Tuesday, said that he has been watching golf instead.

“I don’t think about it, George. I have paid no attention to that whole business,” he told ABC News’ Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos in an exclusive interview.

“I paid a lot of attention to the British Open,” he said. “Glad to see that guy from Iowa won.”

An ABC News/Washington Post poll released on Monday shows Kasich at 2 percent support among registered voters. Trump is dominating the race with 24 percent, followed by Scott Walker with 13 percent and Jeb Bush with 12 percent.

Kasich, a two-term governor of the critical swing state of Ohio, kicked off his campaign on Tuesday in an already-crowded GOP field.

“It’s the challenges that make you better. I have lived through them, and I have become stronger for them, and American has become stronger for them,” Kasich said.

Kasich tied for 12th place in Monday’s new ABC News/Washington Post poll. He needs to be in the top 10 in order to be on stage for the first Republican debate in early August.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — Americans by a wide margin express discomfort with the country’s direction on social issues, a potentially potent force in political preferences.

Just 34 percent in the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll say they’re comfortable with the country’s social direction, while 63 percent are uncomfortable. Indeed more than four in 10 are “strongly” uncomfortable, three times as many as are strongly comfortable with the changes occurring.

See a PDF with full results, charts and tables here.

Ideological and partisan divisions largely align with that discomfort. It’s highest by far among conservatives and Republicans, but also substantial in centrist groups, i.e., moderates and independents. Liberals and Democrats are much more comfortable with the country’s social direction but not universally so by any means.

Some issues are particularly divisive. This poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates, finds that the public splits almost evenly on the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold a key portion of Obamacare, 45-42 percent, support-oppose, and on efforts to ban displaying the Confederate flag on government property, 46-44 percent. And while 52 percent support the high court’s ruling upholding the right of gays and lesbians to marry, 44 percent are opposed. (Allowing gays to marry is more popular in general than is the court’s ruling.)

There, of course, are other issues afoot, ranging, for instance, from debates over police treatment of minorities to immigration policy to the relaxation of marijuana laws. And individual issues may play out differently, some preferred by one side of the political spectrum, some by the other.

Regardless, the broader discomfort underscores today’s charged political landscape — and may have policy and political impacts alike.

For instance, the view that the country’s headed in the right direction overall — closely associated with comfort about social changes, as well as with economic sentiment — has declined by 8 percentage points since January, to just 31 percent; instead, 65 percent say the country’s seriously off on the wrong track, up by 9 points.

And politically, much of President Obama’s approval rating and Hillary Clinton’s support in the 2016 presidential contest comes from people who express comfort with the country’s direction on social issues. If discomfort advances, both may be at some risk.

Specifically, among people who are comfortable with the country’s overall direction on social issues, 76 percent approve of Obama’s performance as president — a logical result, since he’s at the helm. Among those who are uncomfortable, approval of Obama plummets to 28 percent.

Similarly, in a hypothetical match-up against Jeb Bush, Clinton gets 75 percent support from registered voters who are comfortable with the country’s social direction, more than twice her level of support from those who are uncomfortable. Bush, in contrast, does better with the larger group of registered voters who are uncomfortable, rather than those who are comfortable, by 57-21 percent.

There are countervailing attitudes. In one, Americans by a broad 68-27 percent say the country’s economic system favors the wealthy rather than treating most Americans fairly. And this issue works for Clinton. She leads Bush by 2-1, 62-31 percent, among those who see the economic system as unfair, while he leads by 67-27 percent among those who see it as mostly fair.

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SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — President Obama joked about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s unexpected rise to the top of the crowded field of GOP candidates during a taping of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart Tuesday.

Asked by the late-night comedian if he had any advice “to bequeath to future President Trump,” Obama mused that the Republican Party must be appreciating Trump’s popularity.

“I’m sure the Republicans are enjoying Mr. Trump’s dominance,” the president joked.

“Anything that makes them look less crazy,” Stewart quipped in return.

Obama’s comments on Trump come one day after a new ABC News/Washington Post poll shows Trump leading the Republican field of presidential contenders with 24 percent support among Republicans and Republican-leaning independents who are registered to vote. His closest rivals, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, trail with 13 and 12 percent, respectively.

The president sat down with Stewart one final time before the late-night comedian steps down from his post in August — a point on which the commander in chief gave Stewart a hard time.

“I can’t believe you’re leaving before me,” Obama said. “In fact, I’m issuing a new executive order that Jon Stewart cannot leave the show. “

“It’s being challenged in the courts,” the president jokingly added following laughter from the audience.

Stewart also asked the president about his relationship with the media.

The president admitted that there are “some that get on my nerves more than others” but that his main concern is not over the media being too tough or unfair. Instead, he said, he sees a challenge in getting the media to focus on the big issues of the day.

“It gets distracted by shiny objects,” Obama said of the media. “Part of that is just the changing nature of technology. It’s hard to do an hour-long special on ‘The Other America,’ let’s say, or some of the other classic documentaries done a long time ago,” Obama said. “On big tough issues sometimes it’s hard to get entire nation’s attention, but part of my job and part of the job of the White House is, how do we adapt to the new environment?”

The president was also reflective of his accomplishments as president but conceded that there are some issues he hasn’t fully tackled.

“One of the things I’m proud of, and this is not just me, is that we have looked at a whole slew of problems when we came into office and we said, ‘where can we advance the ball down the field each and every time across the board?’ And we don’t always score a touchdown every time, but we move the ball forward,” Obama said.

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ABC News(COLUMBUS, Ohio) — Ohio Gov. John Kasich is casting a wide net at the start of his presidential campaign, hoping to bridge racial and economic divides on his way to the Republican nomination.

“If you’re poor, if you’re black, if you’re brown, if you’re struggling, we care about you,” he told ABC News’ Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos in an exclusive interview. “And we’re going to work to make sure you’re included in the American dream.”

Kasich, the two-term governor of the critical swing state of Ohio, became the 16th candidate to join the race for the GOP nomination on Tuesday.

“I care about them. I want them to have a good life,” he continued. “I want their kids to have a good life: black, brown, white, doesn’t matter, hurt, addicted, big trouble or rich.”

But when asked whether the Republican Party, which has struggled to garner votes from minority and low-income voters in past elections, was ready for that message, Kasich stood firm.

“I guess that doesn’t matter, does it? I mean, that’s my message,” he said. “I’m not going to change it.”

The move comes as some in the party worry that Donald Trump’s comments about immigrants being “criminals” and “rapists” will alienate Hispanic voters from the party.

Still, Kasich is currently polling at only 2 percent, which leaves him off the first debate stage in a tie for 12th place, according to Monday’s ABC News/Washington Post poll. Trump leads with 24 percent of GOP support.

Kasich isn’t the only GOP candidate reaching out to racial minority voters. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio have been actively seeking Hispanic support, citing their experience in the Sunshine State. Meanwhile, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul and former Texas Gov. Rick Perry have been reaching out for support from African Americans.

“I don’t think the country’s red or blue,” Kasich said. “I think the country’s America.”

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Albert de Bruijn/iStock/ThinkStock(WASHINGTON) — Eleven-year-old Logan Fairbanks and his father Josh still can’t believe they’re visiting the White House.

“I am super excited to be in D.C.,” Logan told ABC News.

It seems a little bit like a dream, but it started as a nightmare. Logan, who is going into the seventh grade, likes to post entertaining videos of himself on YouTube from his home computer in Hartford, Michigan. But what he was getting back wasn’t so funny. He noticed a stream of really vicious comments directed at him by Internet trolls — people who view videos on the internet and write nasty comments.

With his Dad’s camera rolling, Logan confronted the cyber bullies head-on. In his two minute video, the Logan bravely recites all the awful posted insults to camera. The ugly words coming from Logan’s mouth are jarring in tandem with his innocent, freckled face.

“He looks like such a stupid fatso. I’m surprised he fits in the front seat. I hope he dies. I hope he gets cancer.” The horrible sentences keep coming, but Logan believes this was the most effective way to strike back.

“I did it not only to help the bullies not bully anymore but to inspire people that are being bullied and not to let the words affect you,” Logan said.

His message has made an impact. The video has registered almost a million views. And among those many views, one famous fan at the White House. Valerie Jarrett, senior adviser to President Obama saw the video and took to Twitter to extend a special invitation to Logan.

Thanks to donations raised by a GoFundMe campaign, the Fairbanks family made their dream a reality — but not only for Logan and his parents — even Logan’s 8-month-old brother Peyton came along in his stroller for the ride. Dad Josh Fairbanks says the family had never walked so much. They already visited the Lincoln Memorial and the WW2 Memorial. They will get an evening tour of the West Wing after visiting with Jarrett at the White House.

With all the attention, what do Logan and his family hope to accomplish?

“We want to take the power from the bullies so they can’t hurt you,” Josh Fairbanks said.

He’s set up a foundation called “Take the Power Away.” The Fairbanks family members are meeting with their home-state U.S. Rep. Fred Upton and hope to set up an organization that could go into schools and provide support to students and teachers to ward off bullying.

Logan celebrates his 12th birthday on Monday and his parents says the Washington trip will be a gift he’ll never forget.

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Scott Olson/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — A United States appellate court dismissed five of the 18 corruption counts against former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich.

The court ruled on Tuesday that he didn’t break the law when he tried to barter President Obama’s former U.S. Senate seat for a cabinet position in the Obama Administration.

Blagojevich has already serviced three years out of a 14 year sentence but will now be re-sentenced.

The former governor’s brother and former fundraiser, Robert Blagojevich, is hoping for leniency. “I’m just very encouraged and uplifted by the possibility that my brother will get some, some justice and relief form what to me was an extremely harsh sentence.”

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J.D. Pooley/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who on Tuesday became the newest addition to the Republican presidential field, looked ahead to a potential general election matchup with Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

In an exclusive interview with ABC News’ Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos, Kasich said the key to the race will be vision.

“I think the battle is — against Hillary — is who’s got the biggest and largest vision for the country,” Kasich said shortly after announcing his presidential campaign in Ohio. “I think she sometimes is really too narrow.”

Kasich said that while Clinton may be harmed by various scandals, in the end, it will come down to “the best vision and record.”

“I’ve told Republicans, you know, Benghazi emails, all that other stuff, it’ll be a part of the discussion,” he said. “But it’s all about, it’s about vision. It’s about, it’s about record. And it’s about who can bring this country back.”

During the interview Kasich told Stephanopoulos what he’s been hearing from operatives in the Democratic Party about his chances in 2016.

“I’ve been hearing from these Democrat operatives that John Kasich, me — I don’t want to sound like I’m Bob Dole, you know? But John Kasich, you know – me — that I’m their greatest fear. I mean, we hear it all the time.”

Kasich added: “I actually ran into one of their big campaign managers. And he said, ‘You know, we do worry about you.’ I said, ‘Why don’t you say it publicly?’ He said, ‘Are you crazy? We’re not going give you any publicity.'”

ABC US News | World News

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(PITTSBURGH) — President Obama thanked veterans at a national convenction of the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Pittsburgh on Tuesday.

The audience was comprised mostly of veterans, and President Obama said, “There was a time back during the draft when virtually every American had at some point a loved one or friend in the military. Today, it’s an all-volunteer force, so a lot of folks don’t always have direct contact with our troops and with our veterans. One of the great privileges of my office is that I do [have direct contact with veterans], and that’s why as president, I considered my obligation to help make sure that even though less than one percent of Americans wear the uniform, that 100 percent of Americans honor your sacrifices and your service.”

The president also honored the fallen in last week’s Chattanooga shooting, discussing each victim killed last week and the threat of lone wolves.

“This threat of lone wolves and small cells is hard to detect and prevent. So, our entire government, along with state and local partners, we are going to keep doing everything in our power to protect the American people, including our men and women in uniform,” he said. “We are grateful to the courageous police, who stopped the rampage and saved lives, and we draw strength from yet another American community that has come together with an unmistakable message to those who would try to do us harm: we will not give into fear, you cannot divide Americans, you can never change our way of life, or the values of freedom and diversity that make us Americans.”

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(PITTSBURGH) — President Obama thanked veterans at a national convenction of the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Pittsburgh on Tuesday.

The audience was comprised mostly of veterans, and President Obama said, “There was a time back during the draft when virtually every American had at some point a loved one or friend in the military. Today, it’s an all-volunteer force, so a lot of folks don’t always have direct contact with our troops and with our veterans. One of the great privileges of my office is that I do [have direct contact with veterans], and that’s why as president, I considered my obligation to help make sure that even though less than one percent of Americans wear the uniform, that 100 percent of Americans honor your sacrifices and your service.”

The president also honored the fallen in last week’s Chattanooga shooting, discussing each victim killed last week and the threat of lone wolves.

“This threat of lone wolves and small cells is hard to detect and prevent. So, our entire government, along with state and local partners, we are going to keep doing everything in our power to protect the American people, including our men and women in uniform,” he said. “We are grateful to the courageous police, who stopped the rampage and saved lives, and we draw strength from yet another American community that has come together with an unmistakable message to those who would try to do us harm: we will not give into fear, you cannot divide Americans, you can never change our way of life, or the values of freedom and diversity that make us Americans.”

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Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images(BLUFFTON, S.C.) — It’s officially war between Republican Presidential contenders Donald Trump and Lindsey Graham.

Just one day after South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham called Donald Trump a “jackass,” Trump retaliated by reading Lindsey Graham’s cell phone number from the microphone during a speech in South Carolina on Tuesday.

“[Graham] said, ‘Can you mention my name?’ I say, ‘Yes I will.’ And he gave me his number,” Trump said. “And I found the card. I wrote the number down. I don’t know if it’s the right number. Let’s try it.”

Trump then read the number — which a representative from Graham’s Senate office confirmed to ABC News is Graham’s cell phone.

“I don’t know — it’s three or four years ago — maybe it’s an old number,” Trump continued. “Your local politician: He won’t fix anything, but he’ll still talk to you.”

A call to the number from ABC News went unanswered: it rang once before hitting an automated voicemail box. A woman’s voice says the mailbox belongs to Lindsey Graham, but the mailbox was full.

Trump also called Graham an “idiot” and a “lightweight,” adding that he “doesn’t seem like a very bright guy.”

The real estate mogul was kicking off his campaign in South Carolina — Lindsey Graham’s home state and the third state in the primary and caucus process.

Graham’s campaign quickly released a statement: “Because of Trump’s bombastic and ridiculous campaign, we aren’t talking about Obama’s horrible deal with Iran or Hillary Clinton’s plans to continue Obama’s failed national security agenda,” said Christian Ferry, Graham’s campaign manager.

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