ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Key provisions of the Patriot Act — the controversial law that allows the NSA to collect Americans’ phone records and secretly track suspected terrorists – will likely expire Sunday night, a former White House counterterrorism official told ABC’s George Stephanopoulos on This Week.

“What I think will likely happen tonight is the law will expire,” Richard Clarke said Sunday morning. “And then later in the week, the USA Freedom Act, which is essentially the same as the Patriot Act with the exception of the telephony metadata program, that act will pass and most of the authorities will be restored.”

Though the White House says even a temporary lapse in the NSA’s authority could affect national security, Clarke says it’s unlikely to endanger Americans.

“It probably is not as big a deal as the president is making out,” he said, noting that the FBI can use other tools, like warrants, in the interim.

“We’re likely to be faced with only a few days where the FBI won’t have a handful of tools that, frankly, they don’t often use,” said Clarke, who in 2013 recommended that the Obama administration end bulk metadata collection.

But CIA Director John Brennan doesn’t seem to agree.

“I think terrorist elements have watched very carefully what has happened here in the United States,” Brennan said on CBS’s Face the Nation Sunday when asked whether terrorists would take advantage of a brief lapse. “They are looking for the seams to operate within, and this is something that we can’t afford to do right now.

“Unfortunately, I think that there has been a little too much political grandstanding,” Brennan told anchor Bob Schieffer. “These tools are important to American lives.”

Three provisions of the Patriot Act — including Section 215, which gives the NSA the authority to collect phone metadata — are set to expire automatically at midnight Sunday night unless Congress works out a deal.

Two other provisions could also run out Sunday night: one that allows law enforcement to impose roving wiretaps on terror suspects who frequently switch phones, and another that allows officials to monitor suspected terrorists even if they can’t establish a connection to a known terrorist organization (this “lone wolf” provision has never been used).

Some lawmakers, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell want Congress to reauthorize the act as-is. Others, like Senator Ted Cruz and Senator Patrick Leahy, are urging Congress to pass instead the USA Freedom Act, which would abolish bulk metadata collection but leave the roving wiretaps and lone wolf provisions intact. Rather than allowing the NSA to retain metadata, the Freedom Act would put those records in the hands of phone providers, who would turn them over only if the government obtained a specific warrant.

Though the House of Representatives passed the bill 303-121, it fell just three votes short of moving forward in the Senate.

In his weekly address, President Obama lauded the House for passing the measure, and encouraged the Senate to do the same.

“Terrorists like al Qaeda and ISIL aren’t suddenly going to stop plotting against us at midnight tomorrow. And we shouldn’t surrender the tools that help keep us safe,” the president warned. “It would be irresponsible. It would be reckless. And we shouldn’t allow it to happen.”

But some in Congress, most notably Kentucky Senator Rand Paul, have vowed to end the Patriot Act once and for all. The Republican senator-turned-presidential-hopeful has declared he’ll force the law’s expiration, likely by using procedural tactics to delay votes on reform.

If he’s successful, “there is no plan B,” according to the White House.

The NSA will begin shutting down its surveillance operation at 4 p.m. Sunday, just as the Senate reconvenes. If it doesn’t cancel the shutdown by 8 p.m., the stoppage becomes irreversible, and no data can be collected or analyzed until the system restarts, which could take an entire day.

“Heaven forbid, we’ve got a problem where we could have prevented a terrorist attack but we didn’t do so simply because of inaction in the Senate,” Obama said Friday.

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Rarely has a sitting president or vice president lost a child.

Indeed, Saturday’s death of Vice President Joe Biden’s son, Beau Biden, marks the first time in over 50 years that a U.S. president or vice president has experienced the death of child while in office.

“It is with broken hearts that Hallie, Hunter, Ashley, Jill and I announce the passing of our husband, brother and son, Beau, after he battled brain cancer with the same integrity, courage and strength he demonstrated every day of his life,” the vice president said in a statement.

Here are some presidents who lost a child while in office:

Abraham Lincoln:

In 1862, President Lincoln’s son, 11-year-old Willie, died from typhoid fever. The boy may have contracted the disease from contaminated water at the White House, according to the Washington Post.

Calvin Coolidge:

In 1924, President Coolidge’s son, Calvin Jr., died from blood poisoning. The teenager was likely poisoned from a blister he got on his toe while playing lawn tennis on the White House South Grounds.

John F. Kennedy:

Before Beau Biden, the last time a child of a sitting president or vice president passed away was in August 1963, when John F. Kennedy’s son Patrick Kennedy died two days after his premature birth in Massachusetts.

Patrick was born five weeks early and weighed less than 5 pounds, the Washington Post reported. While Jackie Kennedy was treated at a Cape Cod hospital, the president slept at the Children’s hospital in Boston to be with Patrick, according to the Washington Post.

Kennedy was assassinated in Texas just months later.

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Rarely has a sitting president or vice president lost a child.

Indeed, Saturday’s death of Vice President Joe Biden’s son, Beau Biden, marks the first time in over 50 years that a U.S. president or vice president has experienced the death of child while in office.

“It is with broken hearts that Hallie, Hunter, Ashley, Jill and I announce the passing of our husband, brother and son, Beau, after he battled brain cancer with the same integrity, courage and strength he demonstrated every day of his life,” the vice president said in a statement.

Here are some presidents who lost a child while in office:

Abraham Lincoln:

In 1862, President Lincoln’s son, 11-year-old Willie, died from typhoid fever. The boy may have contracted the disease from contaminated water at the White House, according to the Washington Post.

Calvin Coolidge:

In 1924, President Coolidge’s son, Calvin Jr., died from blood poisoning. The teenager was likely poisoned from a blister he got on his toe while playing lawn tennis on the White House South Grounds.

John F. Kennedy:

Before Beau Biden, the last time a child of a sitting president or vice president passed away was in August 1963, when John F. Kennedy’s son Patrick Kennedy died two days after his premature birth in Massachusetts.

Patrick was born five weeks early and weighed less than 5 pounds, the Washington Post reported. While Jackie Kennedy was treated at a Cape Cod hospital, the president slept at the Children’s hospital in Boston to be with Patrick, according to the Washington Post.

Kennedy was assassinated in Texas just months later.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — After his formal announcement Saturday that he would seek the Democratic Party nomination for president, former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley sat down for an exclusive one-on-one interview with ABC News’ Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos.

O’Malley, who served two terms as governor and two terms as Baltimore’s mayor prior to that, emphasized his experience as a manager while also working to distinguish himself from front-runner Hillary Clinton along generational lines.

“I believe our country is facing some very deep challenges. And I believe that we’re not going to overcome our problems without new leadership,” he said. “So what I offer in this race, George, is 15 years of executive experience accomplishing difficult things and bringing people together to get them done.”

O’Malley said the Obama administration had kept the country from falling into an ever deeper recession, but he said he has something different to offer.

“We’ve had Democratic presidents 16 of the last 24 years,” Stephanopoulos said. “How would a Martin O’Malley presidency be different from Bill Clinton’s, different from Barack Obama’s?”

“I differ, I would say, from President Obama in my background and my experience. His was that of a legislator. Mine was of a big city, and also facing difficult challenges, and also of a state,” he said.

O’Malley is positioning himself to the left of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. During his announcement speech he repeatedly said the country needed to rebuild the middle class and hold Wall Street accountable. He lamented that, in his opinion, Wall Street had grown too powerful, saying if a “bank is too big to fail without wrecking our nation’s economy, then it needs to be broken up, before it breaks us … again.”

He criticized Jeb Bush and Hilly Clinton for what he sees as their close relationship to big banks. “One of the most important differences when it comes to reining in Wall Street is who’s on our side. I have the independence. I have the track record,” he said. “I am not beholden to Wall Street interests. There are not Wall Street CEOs banging down my door and trying to participate or help my campaign.”

O’Malley, 52, also joined the growing chorus of progressives calling on Hillary Clinton to take a position on the proposed Transpacific Partnership trade deal under negotiation. O’Malley said he is against the deal and that it would be bad for workers.

He added that Clinton has been “awfully silent” on the issue. He went on to draw parallels between this possible deal and NAFTA, which was signed by President Bill Clinton.

“I think we learn from the past. And what we learned from NAFTA is that for all of the promises, it created a lot of dislocation, not only in our country but in Mexico,” he said.

On other issues of foreign policy, O’Malley stayed fairly moderate. He said he was in favor of the USA Freedom Act passed in the House, which would overhaul NSA’s controversial phone surveillance and metadata collection program while extending other provisions of the Patriot Act. The bill failed in the Senate last week, as did a straight extension of the Patriot Act. As such, key provisions of the Patriot Act are set to expire tonight.

“We need to improve upon the Patriot Act,” O’Malley said.

He argued in favor of a few specific updates including a need for a public advocate in negotiations with Foreign Intelligence Surveillance courts and changes to warrant procedures. “We’re a people who should never give up our privacy for our security,” he continued.

Nationwide, O’Malley barely registers in polling, but he said he is accustomed to being an underdog, at just 1 percent in some polls.

“The presidential primary processes and the caucuses in Iowa have a certain greatness to them in that people there have seen 1 percent candidates before get into the van, go from county to county to county and make their case about their better choices that they would offer the nation, and suddenly become very well-known overnight,” he said.

In addition to Clinton, O’Malley faces a challenge from Vermont’s independent Sen. Bernie Sanders, who has risen significantly in the polls lately gaining traction with his message of economic populism. Asked why progressives should vote for O’Malley over Sanders, O’Malley responded, “Because I have a track record of actually getting things done, not just talking about things.”

The former governor spent the weekend on the campaign trial with events in Iowa and New Hampshire.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — After his formal announcement Saturday that he would seek the Democratic Party nomination for president, former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley sat down for an exclusive one-on-one interview with ABC News’ Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos.

O’Malley, who served two terms as governor and two terms as Baltimore’s mayor prior to that, emphasized his experience as a manager while also working to distinguish himself from front-runner Hillary Clinton along generational lines.

“I believe our country is facing some very deep challenges. And I believe that we’re not going to overcome our problems without new leadership,” he said. “So what I offer in this race, George, is 15 years of executive experience accomplishing difficult things and bringing people together to get them done.”

O’Malley said the Obama administration had kept the country from falling into an ever deeper recession, but he said he has something different to offer.

“We’ve had Democratic presidents 16 of the last 24 years,” Stephanopoulos said. “How would a Martin O’Malley presidency be different from Bill Clinton’s, different from Barack Obama’s?”

“I differ, I would say, from President Obama in my background and my experience. His was that of a legislator. Mine was of a big city, and also facing difficult challenges, and also of a state,” he said.

O’Malley is positioning himself to the left of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. During his announcement speech he repeatedly said the country needed to rebuild the middle class and hold Wall Street accountable. He lamented that, in his opinion, Wall Street had grown too powerful, saying if a “bank is too big to fail without wrecking our nation’s economy, then it needs to be broken up, before it breaks us … again.”

He criticized Jeb Bush and Hilly Clinton for what he sees as their close relationship to big banks. “One of the most important differences when it comes to reining in Wall Street is who’s on our side. I have the independence. I have the track record,” he said. “I am not beholden to Wall Street interests. There are not Wall Street CEOs banging down my door and trying to participate or help my campaign.”

O’Malley, 52, also joined the growing chorus of progressives calling on Hillary Clinton to take a position on the proposed Transpacific Partnership trade deal under negotiation. O’Malley said he is against the deal and that it would be bad for workers.

He added that Clinton has been “awfully silent” on the issue. He went on to draw parallels between this possible deal and NAFTA, which was signed by President Bill Clinton.

“I think we learn from the past. And what we learned from NAFTA is that for all of the promises, it created a lot of dislocation, not only in our country but in Mexico,” he said.

On other issues of foreign policy, O’Malley stayed fairly moderate. He said he was in favor of the USA Freedom Act passed in the House, which would overhaul NSA’s controversial phone surveillance and metadata collection program while extending other provisions of the Patriot Act. The bill failed in the Senate last week, as did a straight extension of the Patriot Act. As such, key provisions of the Patriot Act are set to expire tonight.

“We need to improve upon the Patriot Act,” O’Malley said.

He argued in favor of a few specific updates including a need for a public advocate in negotiations with Foreign Intelligence Surveillance courts and changes to warrant procedures. “We’re a people who should never give up our privacy for our security,” he continued.

Nationwide, O’Malley barely registers in polling, but he said he is accustomed to being an underdog, at just 1 percent in some polls.

“The presidential primary processes and the caucuses in Iowa have a certain greatness to them in that people there have seen 1 percent candidates before get into the van, go from county to county to county and make their case about their better choices that they would offer the nation, and suddenly become very well-known overnight,” he said.

In addition to Clinton, O’Malley faces a challenge from Vermont’s independent Sen. Bernie Sanders, who has risen significantly in the polls lately gaining traction with his message of economic populism. Asked why progressives should vote for O’Malley over Sanders, O’Malley responded, “Because I have a track record of actually getting things done, not just talking about things.”

The former governor spent the weekend on the campaign trial with events in Iowa and New Hampshire.

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iStock/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) — Martin O’Malley faces an uphill battle. The former Maryland Governor who officially announced his run for the Democratic presidential nomination Saturday is relatively unknown nationwide, polling around 1 percent among Democratic voters across the country, according to a new poll from Quinnipiac University this week. But perhaps his greatest challenge comes from his own backyard.

During his campaign kickoff event Saturday, a small group of protesters successfully made a scene, speaking out against police brutality and blaming O’Malley for what they see as the negative consequences of his tough stance on crime.

“If he wants to be president, if he wants to come home, he must atone,” said Tawanda Jones, one of the protesters. “Our streets are not even safe no more, because of all of the anger in our city.”

When he first ran for mayor of Baltimore in 1999, O’Malley promised to cut crime, and when he came into office he instituted a zero-tolerance policing policy. Supporters say that while arrests went up, even for minor offenses, crime came down. But critics say the methods harmed the relationship between the city’s residents and law enforcement.

In an exclusive interview with ABC News’ Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos, O’Malley defended his reputation. “I would not have been elected with 91 percent of the vote first time, or re-elected four years later with 88 percent of the vote, if we were not making substantial progress,” he said.

“When I was elected in 1999, our city had become the most violent, and addicted, and abandoned city in America. It was a huge challenge. But we went on in the next ten years to achieve the biggest reduction of part one crime of any city in America,” he continued. “For all of the progress that we make, there’s always so much more that needs to be done.”

Last month the violent protests in Baltimore following the death of an African-American teenager at the hands of police, reignited criticism of O’Malley’s policies. And in a front page article in the Baltimore Sun the day of O’Malley’s campaign kickoff event, a former head of the city’s NAACP chapter hit the former mayor hard, saying, “He’s going around now like [Baltimore] is his claim to fame. I think this should be his greatest embarrassment.”

O’Malley called the unrest in Baltimore last month “heartbreaking” and said the country should learn from Baltimore and focus on issues like unemployment and poverty to rebuild American cities.

“What took place here was not only about race, not only about policing in America. It’s about everything it is supposed to mean to be an American,” he said during Saturday’s rally. “The scourge of hopelessness that happened to ignite here that evening transcends race or geography. The hard truth of our shared reality is this: Unemployment in many American cities and in many small towns across the United States is higher now than it was eight years ago.”

“A poet once wrote that the unemployment in our bones erupts in our hands and stones. We can do better as a country,” he told Stephanopoulos.

Prior to leaving office last October, O’Malley’s approval ratings in Maryland were at an eight-year low (41 percent according to a Washington Post poll), though his presidential announcement rally was full of energetic elected officials and supporters from across the state. One fan, Baltimore City Councilwoman Rikki Spector brought a rock with the word “Believe” etched in it as a gift for the governor.

Despite all the controversy she said this was their – Baltimore’s – presidential race.

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iStock/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) — Martin O’Malley faces an uphill battle. The former Maryland Governor who officially announced his run for the Democratic presidential nomination Saturday is relatively unknown nationwide, polling around 1 percent among Democratic voters across the country, according to a new poll from Quinnipiac University this week. But perhaps his greatest challenge comes from his own backyard.

During his campaign kickoff event Saturday, a small group of protesters successfully made a scene, speaking out against police brutality and blaming O’Malley for what they see as the negative consequences of his tough stance on crime.

“If he wants to be president, if he wants to come home, he must atone,” said Tawanda Jones, one of the protesters. “Our streets are not even safe no more, because of all of the anger in our city.”

When he first ran for mayor of Baltimore in 1999, O’Malley promised to cut crime, and when he came into office he instituted a zero-tolerance policing policy. Supporters say that while arrests went up, even for minor offenses, crime came down. But critics say the methods harmed the relationship between the city’s residents and law enforcement.

In an exclusive interview with ABC News’ Chief Anchor George Stephanopoulos, O’Malley defended his reputation. “I would not have been elected with 91 percent of the vote first time, or re-elected four years later with 88 percent of the vote, if we were not making substantial progress,” he said.

“When I was elected in 1999, our city had become the most violent, and addicted, and abandoned city in America. It was a huge challenge. But we went on in the next ten years to achieve the biggest reduction of part one crime of any city in America,” he continued. “For all of the progress that we make, there’s always so much more that needs to be done.”

Last month the violent protests in Baltimore following the death of an African-American teenager at the hands of police, reignited criticism of O’Malley’s policies. And in a front page article in the Baltimore Sun the day of O’Malley’s campaign kickoff event, a former head of the city’s NAACP chapter hit the former mayor hard, saying, “He’s going around now like [Baltimore] is his claim to fame. I think this should be his greatest embarrassment.”

O’Malley called the unrest in Baltimore last month “heartbreaking” and said the country should learn from Baltimore and focus on issues like unemployment and poverty to rebuild American cities.

“What took place here was not only about race, not only about policing in America. It’s about everything it is supposed to mean to be an American,” he said during Saturday’s rally. “The scourge of hopelessness that happened to ignite here that evening transcends race or geography. The hard truth of our shared reality is this: Unemployment in many American cities and in many small towns across the United States is higher now than it was eight years ago.”

“A poet once wrote that the unemployment in our bones erupts in our hands and stones. We can do better as a country,” he told Stephanopoulos.

Prior to leaving office last October, O’Malley’s approval ratings in Maryland were at an eight-year low (41 percent according to a Washington Post poll), though his presidential announcement rally was full of energetic elected officials and supporters from across the state. One fan, Baltimore City Councilwoman Rikki Spector brought a rock with the word “Believe” etched in it as a gift for the governor.

Despite all the controversy she said this was their – Baltimore’s – presidential race.

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Alex Wong/Getty Images(CHICAGO) — A man identified as Individual A in an indictment of former House Speaker Dennis Hastert was a student at the school where Hastert worked at the time the alleged “misconduct” against the individual took place, according to a source familiar with the case.

In addition, sources say, there is a second individual who was allegedly victimized in a similar way by Hastert when he was a student. According to sources familiar with the investigation, this person neither asked for nor received any money from Hastert, as Individual A is alleged to have done.

The alleged “misconduct” referenced in the indictment was of a sexual nature involving a male, and dated back to Hastert’s time as a high school wrestling coach and history teacher in Yorkville, Illinois, sources with knowledge of the case told ABC News.

The indictment, revealed Thursday, alleges that Hastert disbursed $1.7 million in hush money payments to conceal alleged misconduct from a period before he entered politics.

Individual A is not likely to face extortion charges, according to sources familiar with the case. One reason, sources said, is that it may not be entirely clear Individual A committed any criminal act. And even if that legal hurdle was resolved, sources added, in order to make an extortion case, prosecutors would need a victim willing to cooperate.

That victim, in theory, would be Hastert. But for Hastert to make the extortion claim, he would have to take the misconduct claim head-on.

The school district that employed Hastert from 1965 to 1981 as a high school history teacher and wrestling coach noted it “was first made aware of any concerns regarding Mr. Hastert when the federal indictment was released” Thursday.

The indictment revealed that Hastert’s time at Yorkville, in Illinois, is “material” to the allegations against him and the U.S. Attorney’s investigation. The indictment itself does not mention what the alleged misconduct is.

A statement released by Yorkville Community Unit School District #115 added it “has no knowledge of Mr. Hastert’s alleged misconduct, nor has any individual contacted the District to report any such misconduct. If requested to do so, the District plans to cooperate fully with the U.S. Attorney’s investigation into this matter.”

A spokesman for Dickstein Shapiro LLC, the lobbying firm that Hastert joined in 2008 after leaving Congress, confirmed in a brief statement that “Dennis Hastert has resigned from the firm.”

Hastert is likely to be arraigned next week, but a date has not yet been set and is entirely up to the judge. The U.S. Attorney’s office in Chicago confirmed that no bond has been set. Customarily, the arraignment happens within five days to a week of an indictment, and bond will be set when Hastert is arraigned, according to a spokeswoman for the U.S. attorney.

Margaret Matlock said she taught physical education at the high school during Hastert’s time there and recalled he had a highly regarded reputation.

“Everybody adored him because he was the wrestling coach and they were always winning state champions,” Matlock said.

David Corwin, whose son Scott Corwin was on one of the wrestling teams coached by Hastert, said the former speaker was a devoted coach and teacher.

“He was a good coach. He took them to wrestling camps in the off season and he did whatever he could for them. He was a good teacher. Couldn’t have asked for a nicer guy,” David Corwin said.

Hastert has not responded to multiple requests for comment by ABC News.

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Tom Pennington/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Sen. Rand Paul said Saturday he plans to “force the expiration” of a controversial National Security Agency surveillance program on Sunday.

“Tomorrow, I will force the expiration of the NSA illegal spy program,” the senator said in a statement Saturday. “I am ready and willing to start the debate on how we fight terrorism without giving up our liberty.”

The Republican senator will likely do this by using procedural tactics to delay votes on measures intended to reform the program. The Patriot Act’s Section 215, which provides the authorities for the NSA’s bulk collection of Americans’ phone records, is one of several provisions set to expire at midnight on June 1.

Paul strongly opposes the reauthorization of the program, which was first unveiled by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden in 2013, as well as a current plan that would offer reforms to it.

“I have fought for several years now to end the illegal spying of the NSA on ordinary Americans,” the Kentucky senator and presidential candidate said. “The callous use of general warrants and the disregard for the Bill of Rights must end. Forcing us to choose between our rights and our safety is a false choice and we are better than that as a nation and as a people.”

The Senate is scheduled to convene at 4 p.m. Sunday for a rare weekend session to determine the future of the program by either voting on the USA Freedom Act, which has passed the House but failed by three votes in the Senate, or a short-term extension of the current program.

The USA Freedom Act would end the government’s collection of the phone metadata and instead require the telephone companies to develop the technology to retain the data that could then be queried via an NSA-obtained warrant.

But Paul will likely use Senate rules to prolong votes on either of those measures, likely pushing final passage of either of those bills until later in the week.

The NSA has prepared to wind down the program ahead of a potential expiration and will start the shutdown process at 4 p.m. Sunday, according to senior administration officials. After four hours, the shutdown will be irreversible, meaning Congress will need to act before then to prevent the program from going dark.

President Obama and Attorney General Loretta Lynch said Friday that the expiration of the phone records collection program would pose a threat to national security.

“I don’t want us to be in a situation in which, for a certain period of time, those authorities go away and suddenly we’re dark and, heaven forbid, we’ve got a problem where we could have prevented a terrorist attack or apprehended someone who was engaged in dangerous activity, but we didn’t do so simply because of inaction in the Senate,” Obama said after meeting with Lynch Friday in the Oval Office.

In addition to Section 215, two other provisions of the Patriot Act will expire: the “Lone Wolf” provision and roving wiretaps power.

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images(DALLAS) — Taya Kyle, the widow of famed Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, says she stands strongly behind former Texas Gov. Rick Perry as he considers a run for the White House in 2016.

Kyle, whose late husband’s book American Sniper inspired the blockbuster 2014 movie of the same name, praised Perry and his wife Anita in an email sent by RickPAC, the political action committee that supports Perry.

“I tend to keep my political opinions to myself, the only candidate I ever endorsed was in a race for county sheriff, but this is different,” Kyle wrote, saying she’d be at an event on Thursday outside Dallas, where Perry is expected to announce his presidential intentions.

“I’ll proudly stand with one of the great leaders this state and country have ever produced: Rick Perry,” she said.

Chris Kyle was the most lethal sniper in U.S. history, and his 2012 book about his service in Iraq became a bestseller before he was shot to death in 2013, by a fellow veteran who he was helping adjust to civilian life.

Taya Kyle was expected to join a slew of current and retired members of the military at Perry’s announcement next week. Retired Navy SEALs Paul Craig, JJ Jones, Pete Scobell and Marcus Luttrell, who wrote the book Lone Survivor that also became a movie, were expected to join several others, including Medal of Honor recipient Mike Thornton, also a retired Navy SEAL, at the event at an airport in Addison, Texas.

With the attendees and the setting, Perry is expected to play up his military service. His five years in the Air Force in the 1970s make him one of only a few potential 2016 presidential contenders who are veterans.

In her email, Kyle said she “got to know” Perry and his wife “outside of the public eye,” calling them “a breath of fresh air in a political system full of people playing games and twisting the truth.”

“My husband may have been in the military, but no one tells me which leader to follow,” Kyle said in the message, explaining her focus on economic track record and character. “That’s why I’ll be there in person as Rick and Anita Perry discuss their future and his vision for America.”

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