Photo by Alexander Aksakov/Getty Images(MOSCOW) — Thousands of mourners marched in Moscow on Sunday to honor Boris Nemtsov, a political opponent of Russian President Vladimir Putin, who was fatally shot outside the Kremlin Friday.

The march was scheduled prior to Nemtsov’s death, but it was originally intended to be a march for peace, against the war in Ukraine. Nemtsov was to lead the march. In light of his death, others went on with plans to march, with one extra cause in mind.

The BBC’s Olga Ivshina said on Sunday that those who marched “hope that this would change things, that this would trigger mass protest movement or this would trigger some changes within Russia.”

ABC’s Foreign Desk correspondent and former Moscow correspondent Kirit Radia said Sunday that the Russian government’s investigation is unlikely to be impartial. The Russian system, he notes, is one “where very few things happen by accident.”

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ron hilton/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — February was one of the coldest, snowiest months in recent memory for many cities around the east coast.

According to the National Weather Service’s station in Boston, records for snowfall were set in Boston; Providence, Rhode Island; Hartford, Connecticut and Worcester, Massachusetts. Worcester and Hartford also saw records set for coldest monthly average temperature.

Please RT! Well, S New England, we made it through one of the worst DJFs in some time, and Feb was one of the worst: pic.twitter.com/98Ebe6tB7K

— NWS Boston (@NWSBoston) March 1, 2015

The Mount Holly, Pennsylvania office of the NWS said that this winter is projected to be one of the top six coldest.

Feb 2015 is shaping up to be in the top 6 coldest! Here are some *preliminary* numbers based on the latest forecast. pic.twitter.com/kzqHuDqu3E

— NWS Mount Holly (@NWS_MountHolly) February 27, 2015

In Maine, the NWS says that last month was the coldest February of all-time and ranks behind only January 1971 for coldest month in history.

Feb 2015 is coldest Feb of all-time @portlandjetport and ranks #2 only behind Jan 1971 (12.2) for coldest month ever! pic.twitter.com/8gNXvvx4od

— NWS Gray (@NWSGray) March 1, 2015

Meanwhile, more snow and cold are making their way towards the northeast, with flakes falling from New York to Washington, D.C. early Sunday afternoon.

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3DSculptor/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Astronauts Terry Virts and Barry Wilmore completed their third spacewalk in eight days Sunday, finishing the installation of 400 feet of cable and multiple antennas that will eventually allow commercial spacecraft to dock at the International Space Station.

Sunday’s spacewalk took five hours and 38 minutes. It was Virts’ third spacewalk and Wilmore’s fourth.

#Spacewalk stats:
5 hrs, 38 minutes
Virts’ third, 19 hrs, 2 min total
Wilmore’s fourth, 25 hrs, 36 min total pic.twitter.com/v1xl73zVSh

— NASA (@NASA) March 1, 2015

In total, NASA says that crews have spent 1,171 hours and 29 minutes conducting 187 spacewalks for maintenance and assembly on the International Space Station.

For the second time in a week, Virts reported seeing some water in the helmet of his spacesuit, though it did not seem to be a major problem.

.@AstroTerry reported a small amount of water in helmet again at repress as on Wed. It’s a known issue; no concern. pic.twitter.com/n3h98UvsMM

— NASA (@NASA) March 1, 2015

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3DSculptor/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Astronauts Terry Virts and Barry Wilmore completed their third spacewalk in eight days Sunday, finishing the installation of 400 feet of cable and multiple antennas that will eventually allow commercial spacecraft to dock at the International Space Station.

Sunday’s spacewalk took five hours and 38 minutes. It was Virts’ third spacewalk and Wilmore’s fourth.

#Spacewalk stats:
5 hrs, 38 minutes
Virts’ third, 19 hrs, 2 min total
Wilmore’s fourth, 25 hrs, 36 min total pic.twitter.com/v1xl73zVSh

— NASA (@NASA) March 1, 2015

In total, NASA says that crews have spent 1,171 hours and 29 minutes conducting 187 spacewalks for maintenance and assembly on the International Space Station.

For the second time in a week, Virts reported seeing some water in the helmet of his spacesuit, though it did not seem to be a major problem.

.@AstroTerry reported a small amount of water in helmet again at repress as on Wed. It’s a known issue; no concern. pic.twitter.com/n3h98UvsMM

— NASA (@NASA) March 1, 2015

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Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Samsung is making a play for the market share Apple gobbled up with the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus.

The South Korean electronics company Sunday unveiled the Galaxy S6 and the Galaxy S6 Edge at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

“These products are the result of a simple philosophy,” Samsung CEO J.K. Shin said. “It comes to two words: Relentless innovation.”

Samsung boasted that it would have the “fastest, brightest camera on the market” and showed how it was able to illuminate a night scene.

Following the success of Apple Pay, Samsung also said its new devices would be equipped with Samsung Pay, a contact-less payment system.

While Apple’s mobile payments solution requires participating merchants to have Near Field Communication readers, Samsung said its payment solution can be used anywhere credit cards are accepted.

Samsung has been working with Visa and MasterCard on the payments system and expects to release it to customers in the United States and South Korea this summer.

Both phones are outfitted with wireless charging, making power cords obsolete. In ten minutes, Samsung says the devices can get enough charge for four hours of everyday use.

Appealing to enterprise users, Samsung said the security of the phones is top of the line, making them ideal for business and government use.

As for the revamped design, the plastic backing of previous Galaxy phones has been replaced with durable Gorilla Glass, a welcomed design improvement for many Galaxy users.

“The new Samsung Galaxy S6 phones are a big improvement in design,” Patrick Moorhead, analyst at Moor Insights & Strategies, told ABC News. “[But] Apple’s consistency versus Samsung’s inconsistency will win most consumers over.”

The biggest difference between the two phones is the curved edge in the aptly named Galaxy S6 Edge.

The curved screen is designed with the purpose of helping users stay in touch with the people closest to them.

The edge will light up with that person’s corresponding color, meaning the user won’t even have to lift their phone to find out who they got a message from.

Both devices will be available on April 10 in 20 countries.

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zabelin/iStock/Thinkstock(DAMASCUS) — The world watched in horror last week as reports surfaced that ISIS militants captured as many as 350 Assyrian Christians in northeastern Syria.

It’s the latest assault by the terror group against religious minorities in the region, after a video released by ISIS online purported to show the beheading of 21 Egyptian Christians in Libya.

Watch the ABC News digital original video below to learn more about the Assyrian Christians kidnapped by ISIS.

World News Videos | US News Videos

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JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images(DALLAS) — Dallas nurse Nina Pham is expected to file a lawsuit against Texas Health Resources calling out the company for their role in her having contracted Ebola last year/

In an exclusive story, the Dallas Morning News reports that Pham cites the company’s lack of training and lack of proper equipment as part of the reason she contracted the disease while treating Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan. She also says the company violated her privacy , making her “a symbol of corporate neglect.”

Pham told the newspaper that she has nightmares, body aches and insomnia as a result of contracting Ebola. “I wanted to believe [the company] would have my back and take care of me,” she says. “But they just haven’t risen to the occasion.”

Pham told the Morning News that she will file her lawsuit on Monday, asking for “unspecified damages for physical pain and mental anguish, medical expenses and loss of future earnings.” Perhaps more importantly, Pham said, she wants to “make hospitals and big corporations realize that nurses and health care workers, especially frontline people, are important.”

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Marcio Silva/iStock/Thinkstock(BAGHDAD) — More than 1,000 Iraqis were killed in acts of terrorism or violence in February, the United Nations says.

In its monthly report, the U.N. Assistance Mission in Iraq notes that 1,103 Iraqis were killed in February and 2,280 more were injured in acts of terror or violence. That figure includes 611 civilians killed and 1,353 injured.

“Daily terrorist attacks perpetrated by [ISIS] continue to deliberately target all Iraqis,” Special Representative of U.N. Secretary-General for Iraq Nickolay Mladenov said. He also mentioned “concerning reports of a number of revenge killings by armed groups in areas recently liberated” from ISIS.

Baghdad was the most heavily affected governorate with 329 civilians killed and 875 injured.

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Metropolitan Police, London(LONDON) — Three British schoolgirls who are believed to have flown to Turkey on their way to Syria in an effort to join ISIS were reportedly seen on surveillance video waiting for a bus the same day they left London.

The three girls — Shamima Begum, 15, Amira Abase, 15, and Kadiza Sultana, 16 — were last seen February 17 when they boarded a flight from London’s Gatwick airport headed for Turkey. The surveillance video shows them waiting at a bus station on the European side of Istanbul later that same day, reports to the BBC.

Scotland Yard believes the Bethnal Green Academy students are now in Syria, having been met at the border by ISIS fighters, according to the BBC. Scotland Yard had previously said the girls were going to join ISIS.

Time codes on the surveillance video suggest the girls were at the bus station for about 18 hours, reports the BBC.

The girls’ relatives have made emotional pleas for them to return home.

“If you’re watching this, baby, please come home,” said Renu Begum, an older sister of one of the missing girls, Shamima Begum, told the BBC last week. “Mum needs you more than anything in the world. You’re our baby and we just want you home, we want you safe. Just contact anybody let them know that you need help.”

Abase Hussen, the father of Amira Abase, told the BBC his daughter told him she was going to a wedding when she left the family home.

A relative of Kadiza Sultana said “everyone’s hurting… especially mum.”

“Find the courage in your heart to contact us and let us know that you’re safe and you’re OK,” the relative said.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) — The new head of the Secret Service has this piece of advice for anyone thinking about trying to breach White House security: Don’t.

“I wouldn’t suggest it,” Secret Service director Joseph Clancy told ABC News in an expansive sit-down interview that explored the scandals that have rocked his agency and the path he’s now charting to protect the First Family and “regain the trust of the American people.”

“We have not received an unfair rap,” he conceded to ABC News’ Pierre Thomas. “I think when you fail, and we have failed, we own it. Now, it’s up to us to correct it.”

In September, a man with a small knife in his pocket jumped the White House’s perimeter fence and made it deep inside the presidential building. That came more than two years after the Secret Service was shaken by the 2012 prostitution scandal out of Cartagena, Colombia.

At the time those scandals and others unfolded, Clancy was the head of security for Comcast, having left the government in 2011 after 27 years with the Secret Service. Clancy was “shocked” by what happened, he said.

Then, last month, a small drone flew over the fence and crashed on the White House grounds – prompting a pre-dawn security scare. President Obama was in India at the time, and although the incident turned out to be a recreational flight gone awry, Clancy said he’s “certainly concerned” about the threat a drone like that could pose.

The newly-appointed Secret Service director was with President Obama in India, and the president “was very concerned, as he should be” about the breach, said Clancy, who found himself briefing the commander-in-chief on the matter.

“He wanted to know what happened,” and he “had very specific questions,” Clancy recalled. “But he has faith in the work that we’re doing.”

Clancy said the Secret Service and other federal agencies “have been doing a lot of research” to develop countermeasures related to drones. He declined to discuss specific ones already in place.

In retrospect, Clancy said, the poor judgment in Cartagena and the failures at the White House five months ago came down to one thing: “Just a lack of self-discipline.”

He dismissed suggestions the high-profile scandals were the product of a culture within the Secret Service that condones poor behavior. He said he “can certainly respect” such claims but insisted the only culture at the Secret Service is quite a different one.

As an example, he pointed to a recent trip he took with President Obama to China, Burma and Australia. An agent became so sick that he had to be hospitalized, but when Clancy visited the agent at the hospital, one of the first things the agent said was, “Sir, I’m sorry I’m out of the mix. I’m sorry I’m not there to pick up my post there,” Clancy recalled.

“That’s the culture that we have,” said Clancy. “Nobody wants to let the agency down, the president down, or the American people. Most importantly, we don’t want to let the American people down.”

Clancy said the more time he spends leading the Secret Service, the more he realizes an insider like himself is the only one who could get that job done.

Two months ago, a bipartisan, independent panel commissioned by the Obama administration to analyze the embattled agency recommended someone with no experience inside the Secret Service, saying “only a director from outside” can “do the honest top-to-bottom reassessment” needed.

“You need some experience in this position,” Clancy told ABC News, adding he plans to win over skeptics.

Clancy said he has three changes in mind to help make that happen: Hire more people, improve training, and raise the fence around the White House.

“We’ve got to do a better job of mentoring, coaching, teaching, and training our people,” he said. “[And] if we can build up our staffing, it will allow us to get more people out to training. With that, as we get more people trained, it’ll help our morale.”

As for the fence, Clancy said he is “very anxious” to make it taller, but that is “a long-term process.” So in the meantime, the Secret Service is planning to implement a series of interim enhancements, including “additional features” atop the fence, according to Clancy.

Those changes will be in place in the “near future,” he said, without offering any more details about the planned enhancements.

The need for a taller fence and better training is only growing, Clancy indicated. In recent years, the Secret Service has seen what he called “a large number” of people, many with some form of mental illness, coming to the White House or Capitol looking to air their grievances.

“That’s where our people have to be so well-trained,” he said. “You have to be able to distinguish those that have some mental illness and need help, and those who really have a desire to cause harm. So our people have to show great restraint, but also a great expertise in how to handle these.”

Furthermore, the Secret Service has some big assignments coming up in the next year – Pope Francis is expected to visit as many as three U.S. cities in September, the following month about 190 heads of state will come to New York to celebrate the United Nations’ seventieth anniversary, and then the 2016 presidential race gets underway.

“It’s going to be a huge challenge for us,” Clancy said. “But we have had these challenges before … Our people will be very busy during that time frame, but we’re up to the challenge.”

Clancy became acting director of the Secret Service in October. President Obama officially appointed him as the Secret Service’s 24th director a little over a week ago.

“I think we’re on the right track,” he said.

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