iStock/Thinkstock(FOXBOROUGH, Mass.) — New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady addressed the media on Thursday regarding the use of under-inflated footballs during Sunday’s AFC Championship Game, saying, “I didn’t alter the ball in any way.”

The NFL found that 11 of the 12 footballs used during the Patriots’ 45-7 win over the Indianapolis Colts were not inflated by the minimum level of 12.5 pounds per square inch, according to ESPN. In the game, Brady passed for 226 yards with three touchdowns and one interception.

“I feel like I always played within the rules,” Brady said. “I would never do anything to break the rules. I believe in fair play and respect the league and everything they are doing to try to create a very competitive playing field for all the NFL teams.”

When the Patriots take the field against the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl 49, the footballs that will be used will have been handled by equipment managers and ball attendants, independent of either team. The policy was in place before the allegations against the Patriots were levied.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

iStock/Thinkstock(OAKLAND, Calif.) — Warriors point guard Stephen Curry poured in 25 points and had six assists as Golden State (24-5) defeated the Minnesota Timberwolves (5-24) on Saturday night, 110-97.

Shooting guard Klay Thompson had 21 points and five rebounds for the Warriors, while small forward Draymond Green contributed four points, eight rebounds, six assists and six steals.

Golden State opened up a 27 point lead, early in the fourth quarter on a basket from shooting guard Justin Holiday. The Warriors would finish 41-of-88 from the field for a 46.6 shooting percentage.

For Minnesota, small forward Thaddeus Young led the way with 17 points and six rebounds while point guard Zach LaVine had 12 points and 14 assists.

Follow @ABCNewsRadio
Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

Read More →

iStock/Thinkstock(ROSEBURG, Ore.) — A male student killed multiple people at a shooting Thursday at a community college in Roseburg, Oregon, authorities said.

The shooter is now dead, police said. The shooter’s identity has not been publicly released, though Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced that he was 20 years old.

Gov. Brown’s spokeswoman Kristen Grainger confirmed that the shooter was a student at the school.

Grainger also said that the number of fatalities and injuries totaled 20 people, but would not specify how many were dead and how many were injured. Neither the sheriff’s office, governor’s office or state police would specify the number of fatalities, though earlier on Thursday, State Police Lt. Bill Fugate told ABC News affiliate KATU-TV that at least seven people were killed.

“It is believed there is only one shooter who is no longer a threat,” the Oregon state police said in a statement. “There is no current threat to the community.”

Mercy Medical Center, a hospital located 5 miles from the school, reported that it has received nine patients and another three are en route.

“Please continue to pray,” the hospital wrote in a post on its Facebook page.

Another local facility, Sacred Heart Medical Center, also tweeted that it was expecting at least three patients from the shooting.

The Douglas County Sheriff’s office confirmed to ABC News that they responded to reports of a shooting at Umpqua Community College at 10:38 a.m. local time Thursday.

Sheriff John Hanlin said that the shooter was initially located in one of the school buildings and Hanlin confirmed that the shooter fired at officers.

“Police units from multiple jurisdictions have responded,” the sheriff’s department said in a post on its official Facebook page.

Students and faculty members are being bused to a local fairgrounds site, and relatives are being told to pick their loved ones up there. There will be counselors at the fairgrounds “for UCC students, staff and their families who need them,” the sheriff’s office tweeted.

Umpqua Community College Interim President Dr. Rita Cavin said that there is still one last bus of students and faculty that has not yet arrived at the fairgrounds.

“It is extremely sad right now to watch these families wait for the last bus,” Cavin said at a news conference.

President Obama has been briefed on the situation, a White House official told ABC News.

Federal agents from the FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are responding to the scene. Due to the location, many agents are travelling great distances to get to the scene. U.S. Customs and Border Protection has offered a chopper from Blaine, Washington, which will transport additional ATF agents and a K-9 to the scene.

Since the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, federal law enforcement agencies have taken a forward leaning approach to these types of incidents, pushing resources into the field as quickly as possible.

Umpqua Community College has about 3,300 full-time students and 16,000 part-time students. It is located about 70 miles south of Eugene.

The school has since announced that it will close its campus until Monday.

The situation at Umpqua Community College is the first school shooting with multiple fatalities since late October of last year. At that time, five people were killed and one injured at a shooting at Marysville Pilchuck High School in Washington state.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

The White House(WASHINGTON) — President Obama spoke on Thursday in the wake of a shooting at an Oregon community college that took at least seven lives, according to ABC affiliate.

“There’s been another mass shooting in America,” the president said in the White House briefing room.

“There are more American families – moms, dads, children – whose lives have been changed forever. That means there’s another community stunned with grief – and communities across the country forced to relive their own anguish and parents across the country who are scared because they know it might have been their family or their children.”

The shooting, which left at least 20 people dead and injured, according to the governor’s office, took place Thursday morning at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon.

The identity of the 20-year-old shooter has not been released.

The president has said the failure to pass more stringent gun safety laws is one of the greatest frustrations of his presidency thus far.

“If you ask me where has been the one area where I feel that I’ve been most frustrated and most stymied, it is the fact that the United States of America is the one advanced nation on Earth in which, we do not have sufficient common-sense gun safety laws, even in the face of repeated mass killings,” he told the BBC in July.


Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning consumers that dietary supplements meant to improve sexual performance may contain ingredients that are found in prescription erectile dysfunction pills like Viagra, Cialis and Levitra.

The agency expressed concern on Thursday that high dosages or unintended combinations could make taking some such supplements dangerous for consumers. In total, the FDA says, nearly 300 suppements found online, in gas stations or in vending machines could contain some of these ingredients.

The supplements take a number of forms, including pills, coffees and chewing gums and are labeled “all natural” or “herbal.” By not disclosing the hidden ingredients, the FDA says, even cautious consumers would be left unaware that they may be taking excessively high doses.

“We’re finding an alarming number of these products sold online and in retail stores,” the FDA’s National Health Fraud Coordinator Gary Coody said in a statement. “Consumers have no way of knowing which drugs or ingredients are actually in the product just by reading the ingredients on the label.”

The FDA reccomends being wary of products promising quick results, being advertised as alternatives to FDA-approved drugs, have labels written in a foreign language, or are sold in single servings.

“Some of these products,” Coody added, “have as many as six different ingredients contained in FDA-approved prescription drugs and analog of those ingredients.” He expressed concern that the agency can’t tell what danger the drugs pose, “because these combinations have never been studied before they’re sold to unsuspecting consumers.”

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

GEOFF ROBINS/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Michael Horn, President and CEO of Volkswagen Group of America, will testify before a House subcommittee next week as part of the congressional investigation into the Volkswagen emissions scandal.

Scheduled to appear before the House Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations at 10 a.m. on Oct. 8, Horn will provide information on the “facts and circumstances surrounding Volkswagen’s reported Clean Air Act violations.” Subcommittee Chair Rep. Tim Murphy, R-Pa., said he hopes to get answers including why the “defeat-devices” were used to fool emissions testers, how the decision to install them was made and how their use went undetected for so long.

“The very notion of a carmaker intentionally violating our environmental laws is beyond belief,” House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton, R-Mich., said. “Reports of Volkswagen selling cars with devices aimed at skirting the law cannot, and will not be tolerated.”

Also scheduled to testify at the Thursday hearing is at least one representative from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

NASIR WAQIF/AFP/Getty Images(KUNDUZ, Afghanistan) — The Afghan government claims that its military forces have retaken the northern city of Kunduz that was seized by hundreds of Taliban fighters on Monday. A large Afghan force, supported by American airstrikes, retook the city in a bloody fight that the Afghan military says killed 150 Taliban fighters and injured 90. It is expected that Taliban fighters outside the city could soon launch a new offensive against Afghan military forces.

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani announced Thursday that Afghan military forces had retaken Kunduz following a six-hour assault on hundreds of Taliban fighters.

“We thank God we had no fatalities,” Ghani claimed as he praised Afghan security forces who “were able to foil one of the most significant operations to have taken place in Afghanistan in fourteen years.”

American officials had acknowledged that the Taliban’s takeover of Kunduz was a setback for Afghan security forces that have received U.S. and NATO training for more than a decade.

A U.S. official told ABC News that while Kunduz is back in the hands of the Afghan military, the city will likely remain contested as the Taliban has massed forces outside the city in an attempt to retake it.

Appearing alongside Ghani, Afghan Interior Minister Noor-ul-Haq Ulumi praised the performance of Afghan security forces.

“We never took our eyes off the ball,” he said. “We had to protect citizens and so the security forces retreated.”

The Afghan counteroffensive was supported by American and coalition special forces.

A U.S. military spokesman in Kabul confirmed that American military aircraft conducted as many as five airstrikes “to eliminate threats to coalition and Afghan forces.”

The U.S. still has 9,800 troops in Afghanistan, serving as part of a training mission that will conclude by the end of next year. After that planned draw down the only U.S. military presence in Afghanistan would involve several hundred personnel at the U.S. embassy in Kabul.

The Taliban takeover of Kunduz has raised concerns that the Afghan security forces may not be ready to fend off expected Taliban offensives once American troops leave at the end of next year.

U.S. officials confirm that General John Campbell, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, has prepared troop level options that could keep a U.S. military force in Afghanistan beyond 2016.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

iStock/Thinkstock(ROSEBURG, Ore.) — Multiple casualties were reported after a shooting at a community college in Roseburg, Oregon, according to the local fire department.

The Douglas County Sheriff’s Department confirmed to ABC News that they responded to reports of a shooting at Umpqua Community College at 10:38 a.m. local time Thursday.

The fire and EMS agency serving Douglas County then reported on Twitter that there were multiple casualties.

“Police units from multiple jurisdictions have responded,” the sheriff’s department said in a post on its official Facebook page.

Students and faculty members are being bused to a local fairgrounds site, and relatives are being told to pick their loved ones up there.

Umpqua Community College has about 3,300 full-time students and 16,000 part-time students. It is located just less than 70 miles south of Eugene.

The situation at Umpqua Community College is still unfolding, and the nature of the alleged shooting is unknown, but it is the first school shooting with multiple fatalities since late October of last year. At that time, five people were killed and one injured at a shooting at Marysville Pilchuck High School in Washington state.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call(WASHINGTON) — House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi defended her position on abortion Thursday, responding forcefully to a confrontational question about whether a fetus is a human being at her weekly news conference.

“Leader Pelosi, in reference to funding of Planned Parenthood, is an unborn baby with a human heart and a human liver a human being?” asked the reporter, who did not identify himself.

“I am a devout, practicing Catholic,” Pelosi, D-Calif., replied. “A mother of five children. When my baby was born, my fifth child, my oldest child was six years old.

“I think I know more about this subject than you, with all due respect,” she continued. “I do not intend to respond to your question which has no basis in what public policy we do here.”

Congress passed a spending bill Wednesday to keep the government open through Dec. 11, averting a shutdown. A majority of Republicans in the House voted against the measure, over objections to funding Planned Parenthood.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — The United States and Russia began talks via video link Thursday to keep their respective military aircraft from coming into contact over the skies of Syria, where both countries are now conducting airstrike operations.

Meanwhile, U.S. officials said that it was clear that ISIS was not targeted by Russian aircraft on Wednesday.

On Monday, President Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin agreed that both nations should work out details to hold the talks as it appeared that Russia would soon begin air operations in Syria.

Two days later, U.S. officials were surprised that Russia began launching airstrikes in Syria even before details had been worked out for when to hold the talks.

The U.S. did not receive advance notification of the start of the Russian airstrikes until an hour before when a Russian general went to the American embassy in Baghdad to request that American aircraft vacate the area where the missions would strike.

Defense Secretary Ash Carter later described that initial Russian contact as a “drop in” and labeled that kind of notification as “unprofessional.” He told reporters that his goals for the talks to “de-conflict” Syrian airspace would be “to facilitate the flow of information between coalition forces and Russian elements that will help us maintain the safety of our personnel in the region, which is critical. To ensure that any additional Russian actions do not interfere with our coalition’s efforts to degrade and defeat ISIL. And to clarify that broader U.S. security commitments in the region remain unchanged.”

Defense officials confirmed that the talks began Thursday morning via a secure video conference between officials at the Pentagon and their Russian counterparts.

The U.S. team is headed by Elissa Slotkin, the acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Affairs and vice Admiral Frank Pandolfe, the Joint Staff’s Director of Strategic Plans and Policy.

A military spokesman in Baghdad said the Russian strikes had not affected U.S. air operations over Syria.

Warren confirmed that Russian aircraft conducted more than half a dozen strikes on Wednesday, but did not have information as to how many airstrikes may have taken place today.

“In the last 24 hours, we have conducted several sorties over Syria,” said Col. Steve Warren. “We have not altered operations in Syria to accommodate new players on the battlefield.”

While noting that there is always the risk of a miscalculation or inadvertent contact involving aircraft from different nations over the skies of Syria, he also noted there are “a lot of square miles in Syria”and American pilots “have terrific situation awareness.”

Warren said that even though Russia has claimed that it is striking at ISIS targets inside Syria, “We don’t believe that they struck ISIL targets.“

A U.S. official told ABC News that Wednesday’s airstrikes near Homs and Hama struck al Nusra and Free Syrian Army locations. The Free Syrian Army is a moderate opposition force that has received assistance from the U.S. for several years. There were also reports that other groups that have received training and equipment from the CIA were also struck by Russian airstrikes.

“When they said that they planned to strike ISIL. And yet, where they struck yesterday, we don’t believe there was any ISIL there,” said Warren using another acronym for ISIS. “So that’s a problem, right?,”said Warren. “The Russians have said that they’re going to do one thing, and here they are doing something different than that, which we, of course, have seen before.”

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Read More →