Associated Press

A terminally ill woman who expects to take her own life under Oregon’s assisted-suicide law says she is feeling well enough to possibly postpone the day she had planned to die.

Brittany Maynard said in early October she expected to kill herself Nov. 1, less than three weeks before her 30th birthday. She emphasized that she wasn’t suicidal, but wanted to die on her own terms and reserved the right to move the date forward or push it back.

While she hasn’t completely ruled Saturday out, Maynard says in a new video she feels she has some more of her life to live.

“I still feel good enough, and I still have enough joy — and I still laugh and smile with my friends and my family enough — that it doesn’t seem like the right time right now,” she says in the video.

“But it will come because I feel myself getting sicker. It’s happening each week.”

Maynard said she was diagnosed with incurable brain cancer earlier this year. Because her home state of California does not have an aid-in-dying law, she moved to Portland and has become an advocate for getting such laws passed in other states.

Maynard’s story, accompanied by photos from her pre-illness wedding day, broke hearts across the globe while igniting a national debate on the issue of physician-assisted suicide.

One opponent is Philip Johnson, a 30-year-old Catholic seminarian from the Diocese of Raleigh, North Carolina. He, like Maynard, has inoperable brain cancer and is plagued by headaches and seizures.

After learning of learning of Maynard’s choice, he wrote an article explaining his view that “suffering is not worthless,” and it’s up to God to take life.

“There is a card on Brittany’s website asking for signatures ‘to support her bravery in this very tough time,'” Johnson wrote on the diocese website. “I agree that her time is tough, but her decision is anything but brave. I do feel for her and understand her difficult situation, but no diagnosis warrants suicide.”

Oregon was the first U.S. state to make it legal for a doctor to prescribe a life-ending drug to a terminally ill patient of sound mind who makes the request. The patient must swallow the drug without help; it is illegal for a doctor to administer it.

Oregon voters approved the Death with Dignity Act in 1994, then reaffirmed it — 60 percent to 40 percent — in 1997. It took more than a decade for another state to join Oregon, but four other states now have such laws.

More than 750 people in Oregon used the law to die as of Dec. 31, 2013, most of them elderly.

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Associated Press

A prisoner whose confession helped free a death row inmate in a case that was instrumental in the campaign to end capital punishment in Illinois was released Thursday after he recanted and a prosecutor said there was powerful evidence that the other man was responsible.

Alstory Simon left the Jacksonville Correctional Center Thursday afternoon. His confession in the high-profile case had gained international attention, in large part because of an investigation of a team of journalism students from Northwestern University that helped secure the 1999 release of Anthony Porter.

Porter had spent 16 years on death row and his supporters maintained he was wrongfully convicted.

Simon was convicted and sentenced to 37 years in prison. But the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office began re-examining Simon’s conviction last year after he recanted his confession. Simon alleged he was coerced into making it by a private investigator, working with the journalism students, who he says promised him he would get an early release and a share of the profits from book and movie deals.

“In the best interest of justice, we could reach no other conclusion but that the investigation of this case has been so deeply corroded and corrupted that we can no longer maintain the legitimacy of this conviction,” Cook County State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez said at a news conference.

The Porter case played a key part in the drive to end the death penalty in Illinois. The case helped lead former Gov. George Ryan to halt all executions in Illinois. Ryan declared a moratorium on executions in 2003 and cleared death row by commuting the death sentences of more than 150 inmates to life in prison. Gov. Pat Quinn abolished the death penalty in 2011.

Alvarez did not say whether she believed Simon is, in fact, innocent, but she said there were so many problems with the case and what she called a coerced confession and the deaths of a number of key figures in the case make it impossible to determine exactly what happened on the morning of Aug. 15, 1982, when two people were shot to death as they sat in a park on Chicago’s South Side.

She also said there remains powerful evidence — including several witnesses who maintain, as they did at the time of the original investigation, that Porter was the gunman — that points to Porter. She said that because of protections against double jeopardy, there is no legal way to retry Porter.

At the hearing Thursday, prosecutors asked the judge to free Simon, and the judge vacated the sentence and conviction.

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AP afghan foces mar 141030 16x9 608 Classified: Military Suddenly Doesnt Want You to Know How $61B Afghan Training Is Going

Oct 30, 2014 1:06pm

Afghan National Army soldiers load their belt-fed machine gun during a mock attack on an enemy’s stronghold during a military training exercise at Kabul Military Training Center, in Kabul, Afghanistan, Oct. 22, 2014.

If you’re curious what America is getting for its multi-billion dollar effort to train and equip local security forces in Afghanistan, sorry, that’s now classified.

In its most recent quarterly report to Congress, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) sharply criticized a new move by the U.S.-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) to classify even the executive summary of its regular reports on the capabilities of the Afghan forces in which the U.S. has invested more than $61 billion.

The regular ISAF reports, most recently called the Regional ANSF Status Report (RASR), have been produced by ISAF in some form since 2008. A majority of the contents always have been classified, since they deal with ground-level capabilities of Afghan forces — potentially useful intelligence for insurgents — but the executive summary was not. SIGAR called the sudden, “inexplicable” classification “deeply troubl[ing]” and a direct hit to government accountability.

“ISAF’s classification of the report summary deprives the American people of an essential tool to measure the success or failure of the single most costly feature of the Afghanistan reconstruction effort,” SIGAR said in its latest quarterly report to Congress. “SIGAR and Congress can of course request classified briefings on this information, but its inexplicable classification now and its disappearance from public view does a disservice to the interest of informed national discussion.”

“It is not clear what security purpose is served by denying the American public even high-level information,” the SIGAR report says.

Afghan Security Forces Still Enduring High Casualty Rates

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Afghan Police Locked Out of Own $7.3M Facility: Report

Lt. Col. Chris Belcher, a public affairs officer at ISAF in Afghanistan, told ABC News in an email that the move was made to “address potential concerns about operational security” after a reevaluation in August.

“After careful review, it was determined that the entirety of the report was classified to include the executive summary which contained Afghan-provided readiness information,” Belcher said. “While we appreciate and understand SIGAR’s responsibility to provide information to Congress and the American public, we have a responsibility to protect data that could jeopardize the operational security of our Afghan partners to include unnecessarily highlighting possible vulnerabilities and capability gaps; information which could provide adversaries critical intelligence that could be exploited, endangering the lives of our Afghan partners and coalition forces serving alongside them.”

READ: SIGAR Report to Congress

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Negotiations with nurse Kaci Hickox, who refuses to be quarantined after treating Ebola patients in West Africa, have “failed” and the governor of Maine will now “exercise the full extent of his authority,” according to a statement from the governor’s office.

Gov. Paul LePage didn’t say whether that meant getting a court order to enforce Hickox’s quarantine or forcing her to take an Ebola blood test. Earlier today, LePage indicated to ABC News that he would abandon his demand that Hickox remain under quarantine if she would agree to take a blood test for the lethal virus.

“I was ready and willing — and remain ready and willing — to reasonably address the needs of healthcare workers meeting guidelines to assure the public health is protected,” LePage said.

The governor made his comment after Hickox defiantly challenged demands that she remain quarantined by leaving her home in Fort Kent this morning for a bike ride with her boyfriend. She was trailed by a police car as she rode.

While Hickox was pedaling, attorneys for the state of Maine went to Superior Court seeking a judge’s permission to give Hickox a blood test for Ebola, LePage said.

“This could be resolved today,” the governor said. “She has been exposed and she’s not cooperative, so force her to take a test. It’s so simple.”

Medical experts have said that an Ebola test would only be positive if someone were symptomatic, and could register a negative result if the amount of Ebola virus in the blood hadn’t reached a detectable level.

LePage’s office later put out a statement saying negotiations with Hickox had failed and the governor will now “exercise the full extent of his authority allowable by law.”

“Maine statutes provide robust authority to the state to use legal measures to address threats to public health,” the statement said.

It added, “Specifics of the process or steps being taken by the state at this time may not be discussed publicly due to the confidentially requirements in law.”

The governor said he has a state police car stationed outside Hickox’s home and that she has the town “scared to death.” ort Kent has a “little rural hospital and if she goes in there she shuts down the whole community,” the governor said.

Hickox, 33, went on her bike ride after vowing Wednesday night she wasn’t willing to “stand here and have my civil rights violated.”

The nurse, who had been treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone for Doctors Without Borders, said she was fighting for her rights as well as other health care workers who will be returning from the Ebola hot zone in West Africa. She said that Doctors Without Borders told her another 20 health care workers will be coming home in the next month.

“Most aid workers who come home just want to see their family and have a sort of normal life,” she said Wednesday night. “I’m fighting for something other than myself. There are aid workers coming back every day.”

Hickox said she isn’t committed to a quarantine that isn’t “scientifically valid,” she said while standing alongside her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur, outside her home. The quarantine demand goes beyond guidelines put out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which indicate that she can’t spread Ebola if she isn’t sick, doesn’t have symptoms and no one is in close contact with her bodily fluids.

“You could hug me, you could shake my hand [and] I would not give you Ebola,” she said.

HIckox returned to the United States on Oct. 24, landing in Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, where she was questioned and quarantined in an outdoor tent through the weekend despite having no symptoms.

Hickox registered a fever on an infrared thermometer at the airport, but an oral thermometer at University Hospital in Newark showed that she had no fever, she said.

After twice testing negative for Ebola, Hickox was released and returned home to Maine on Oct. 27. Maine’s health commissioner announced that Maine would join the handful of states going beyond federal guidelines and asking that returning Ebola health workers be self-quarantined for 21 days.

“I will go to court to attain my freedom,” Hickox told “Good Morning America” Wednesday. “I have been completely asymptomatic since I’ve been here. I feel absolutely great.”

The CDC doesn’t consider health workers who treated Ebola patients in West Africa to be at “high risk” for catching Ebola if they were wearing protective gear, according to new guidelines announced this week. Since they have “some risk,” the CDC recommends that they undergo monitoring — tracking symptoms and body temperature twice a day — avoid public transportation and take other precautions. But the CDC doesn’t require home quarantines for these workers.

Someone isn’t contagious until Ebola symptoms appear, according to the CDC. And even then, transmission requires contact with bodily fluids such as blood and vomit.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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More than half the nation, 27 states, have now announced they are suspending further installation of a controversial guardrail system used on roads around the country following what critics said was a cover-up of a dangerous change in the guardrail’s design made nearly a decade ago.

A flood of states have announced suspension of new installation of the ET-Plus guardrail after a Texas jury found earlier this month that the guardrail maker, Trinity Industries, had defrauded the government by making modifications in 2005 and failing to tell federal or state transportation officials at the time. Trinity was ordered to pay some $175 million in damages – an amount that’s expected to triple by statutory mandate.

Twenty-seven states have said they’ll no longer install the ET-Plus system, some latest states to join being Georgia and Trinity’s home state of Texas. One state, Virginia, said last week it is making plans to remove the guardrails from its highways, but would consider leaving them in place if Trinity can prove the modified version is safe.

The ET-Plus System was the subject of an ABC News “20/20” investigation in September that looked into allegations from crash victims that the modified guardrail can malfunction when struck from the front by their vehicles’. Rather than ribboning out and absorbing the impact as designed, the guardrails “locked up” and speared straight through the cars, severing the motorists’ limbs in some cases.

According to an internal email obtained by ABC News, a company official estimated one particular change – reducing a piece of metal in the guardrail end terminal from five inches to four – would save the company $2 per guardrail, or $50,000 per year.

The Federal Highway Administration has given Trinity until October 31 to submit plans to crash test the guardrail or face a nationwide suspension of its eligibility for sale. Some of the 28 states have said the ET-Plus ban is in place at least until results of those crash tests are available.

Trinity has maintained the guardrails are safe, noting that the FHWA approved the modified guardrail for use after questions about the modifications were raised in 2012. The company plans to appeal the Texas verdict and has previously told ABC News it has a “high degree of confidence in the performance and integrity” of the ET-Plus system.

States That Have Taken Action in Regard to the ET-Plus System:

  • Arizona
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Georgia
  • Louisiana
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Dakota
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • Wisconsin

ABC News’ Lee Ferran contributed to this report.

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PHOTO: Madison Bumgarner of the San Francisco Giants celebrates in the locker room after defeating the Kansas City Royals during the 2014 World Series on Oct. 29, 2014 in Kansas City, Mo.

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San Francisco Giants pitcher Madison Bumgarner received a ton of congratulations after he pitched in the World Series on Thursday night, leading is team to a Game 7 win over the Kansas City Royals.

But before he received the MVP award, his father sent him a text after the eighth winning.

His dad, Kevin Bumgarner, choked up when he showed the text to a New York Times reporter.

Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

PHOTO: Madison Bumgarner of the San Francisco Giants celebrates in the locker room after defeating the Kansas City Royals during the 2014 World Series on Oct. 29, 2014 in Kansas City, Mo.

“OMG. You’re so much more than awesome,” Kevin had written to the star pitcher. “To see you work on the mound reminds me of watching you in high school. You are willing yourself to perfection and dragging the team along with you. I couldn’t be more proud of your baseball accomplishments.”

Kevin told the newspaper: “I knew he wouldn’t read that text before the game was over, but I wanted him to know this was what his daddy thought of him.”

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The closing of al Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem has diplomats holding their breath because the site has been a flashpoint for violence in the past and was the trigger for a five-year long spasm of bloodshed known as the Second Intifada.

The mosque was closed this week after a prominent right-wing rabbi Yehuda Glick was shot and critically wounded. Glick was part of a growing movement among religiously militant Jews demanding more prayer rights at the al Aqsa compound.

The closure so infuriated Palestinians that Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas called it “a ­declaration of war.”

The mosque is intrinsically entwined with volatile Mideast politics. The compound is located at what Muslims call the Dome of the Rock, the site they believe where the prophet Muhammed ascended to heaven. It is the holiest site in the Muslim world outside of Mecca and Medina.

The Israelis call it the Temple Mount and consider it to be where Judaism began and the site of two previous temples.

Control over these sites, and perceptions of encroachment, make for volatile politics.

Jews have been barred from the mosque’s compound since Israeli politician Ariel Sharon went there in 2000 to assert Jewish rights to have access to the area. Sharon, who later became prime minister, was surrounded by hundreds of Israeli police. The move was seen by Palestinians as an incursion and triggered what became known as the Second Intifada or the Al-Aqsa Intifada.

The fighting derailed a U.S. sponsored peace process and raged until 2005, resulting in the deaths of about 3,000 Palestinians and 1,000 Israelis.

The closure this week comes while anger still simmers over the Israeli invasion of Gaza earlier this year.

Ofer Zalzberg, a senior analyst for the International Crisis Group, said he does not believe the current closure will prompt another uprising, but he warned it could add to the growing violence against Israelis by individual Palestinians.

“What we have been seeing for a few years now, but with more force in the last few months, is a kind of unstructured violence, attacks on civilians,” Zalzberg said. He cited as an example the Palestinian man who drove his car into a crowd of Israelis earlier this month.

“They are people who are not affiliated with groups like Hamas,” he said, referring to the militant group that has dominated Gaza in recent years. “And because it’s individuals, it’s incredibly difficult for the Israeli police to prevent.”

Closing the mosque “will feed this,” Zalzberg said. If the mosque compound remains closed for any length of time, Zalzberg predicts, “We will see riots.”

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An Ebola nurse fighting quarantine orders in Maine may get at least one perk: a pizza from Moose Shack on Main Street.

Nurse Kaci Hickox, told reporters last night that the one thing she missed while she was cooped up in her Fort Kent home was Moose Shack pizza. Now, the pizzeria is in contact with the police department to see whether they can deliver a pizza to her today.

Hickox, 33, returned from treating Ebola patients in West Africa last week and this morning broke Maine’s voluntary quarantine by going on a bike ride as officials waffled between whether to seek legal enforcement to the quarantine or let her off the hook with a blood test.

April Hafford, whose father owns the pizzeria, told ABC News that their biggest concern is how their customers will feel about it.

“It’s such a small place here, and it could go either way,” she said. “There’s a lot of people that maybe wouldn’t come here because of it — and who would come because of it. It could go either way.”

Hafford, who said she’s seen Hickox and her boyfriend in the pizza shop three times since it opened in January, said Moose Shack has already received a lot of calls about Hickox this morning, and that the quarantine is a controversial issue in the small town.

So does Hickox have pepperoni or veggies coming her way on that pizza?

“I don’t know,” Hafford said. “We haven’t decided what kind yet.”

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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An Ebola nurse fighting quarantine orders in Maine may get at least one perk: a pizza from Moose Shack on Main Street.

Nurse Kaci Hickox, told reporters last night that the one thing she missed while she was cooped up in her Fort Kent home was Moose Shack pizza. Now, the pizzeria is in contact with the police department to see whether they can deliver a pizza to her today.

Hickox, 33, returned from treating Ebola patients in West Africa last week and this morning broke Maine’s voluntary quarantine by going on a bike ride as officials waffled between whether to seek legal enforcement to the quarantine or let her off the hook with a blood test.

April Hafford, whose father owns the pizzeria, told ABC News that their biggest concern is how their customers will feel about it.

“It’s such a small place here, and it could go either way,” she said. “There’s a lot of people that maybe wouldn’t come here because of it — and who would come because of it. It could go either way.”

Hafford, who said she’s seen Hickox and her boyfriend in the pizza shop three times since it opened in January, said Moose Shack has already received a lot of calls about Hickox this morning, and that the quarantine is a controversial issue in the small town.

So does Hickox have pepperoni or veggies coming her way on that pizza?

“I don’t know,” Hafford said. “We haven’t decided what kind yet.”

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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PHOTO: A small twin engine plane hit a building after losing power in one of its engines soon after taking off from Mid-Continent Airport in Wichita, Kan., Oct. 30, 2014.

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A prop plane crashed into a building this morning at an airport in Wichita, Kansas, officials said.

Two people died in the crash and five people have been rushed to a local hospital to treat “serious” injuries, Wichita Fire Department Chief Ron Blackwell confirmed.

“We don’t know what may have caused the incident,” Blackwell said, noting that responders faced a “horrific firefight for several minutes.”

Emergency crews are on the scene at Mid-Continent Airport, where a federal official has confirmed to ABC News that the incident is not related to terrorism.

The plane was headed to Mena, Arizona, the official said.

KAKE

PHOTO: A small twin engine plane hit a building after losing power in one of its engines soon after taking off from Mid-Continent Airport in Wichita, Kan., Oct. 30, 2014.

There have been no reports of how many people are possibly in danger in the situation, but smoke can be seen billowing from the building from miles away.

PHOTO: Jaison Podkanowicz posted this photo to Twitter on Oct. 30, 2014 from Mid Continent Airport, Wichita, Kansas with the caption, plane crashes into building at Mid Continent Airport.

Jaison Podkanowicz

PHOTO: Jaison Podkanowicz posted this photo to Twitter on Oct. 30, 2014 from Mid Continent Airport, Wichita, Kansas with the caption, “plane crashes into building at Mid Continent Airport”.

The plane involved in the crash was a twin-engine Beechcraft that was taking off but lost power in one engine, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

PHOTO: A passenger at the Mid Continent airport in Wichita, Kansas posted this photo to Instagram on Oct. 30, 2014 with the caption, Not exactly what you want to see before boarding an airplane. #fire

jdbmoc16/Instagram

PHOTO: A passenger at the Mid Continent airport in Wichita, Kansas posted this photo to Instagram on Oct. 30, 2014 with the caption, “Not exactly what you want to see before boarding an airplane. #fire”

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