Hemera/Thinkstock(NORWOOD, Mass.) — A man accidentally won the same lottery twice for a payout of $546,000.

Kenneth J. Stokes, of Norwood, Mass., is a lottery season ticket holder, which automatically enters him into every drawing of a certain lottery with specific, pre-set numbers of his choosing.

Forgetting that his family had gifted him a season pass to the Massachusetts State Lottery Lucky for Life drawing with their lucky numbers, Stokes bought a second ticket with the exact same numbers on Monday.

Then, he got a fateful call from the lotto officials on Tuesday morning.

“The representative called the individual who was the owner of the season ticket and informed him of that and then he was obviously elated to find out that he had won on that ticket,” Massachusetts State Lottery director of communications Christian Teja told ABC News. “They hung up and he realized that he had purchased the same ticket on his own for that same drawing. During the phone call when they had spoken, the representative had mentioned there was another winner form Norwood. He called back and it all came together when he was like, ‘I’m that guy in Norwood.’”

Stokes brought in his winning tickets on Thursday morning to collect his prize. He had won $25,000 a year for up to 20 years, which equals a $500,000 maximum. Stokes opted for a one-time cash option payment, which brought the prize down to $390,000 pre-tax, or $273,000 after tax. For Stokes, however, his winnings were doubled to $546,000.

The odds of Stokes winning twice in one drawing are one in 9.7 trillion. He plans to use the winnings to pay for his son’s college tuition and his daughter’s remaining car payments, as well as take his family on a vacation.

“I saw him yesterday. He was certainly in a good mood with a big smile on his face, as you can imagine,” Teja said. “He’s still somewhat in disbelief but very appreciate of his good fortune.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — A man who attacked New York City police officers with an ax had converted to Islam in recent years and the assault appears to have been a lone wolf terror attack, police said Friday.

One officer who was struck in the head with the ax by Zale Thompson on Thursday is in critical but stable condition, Police Commissioner William Bratton said. A second officer was also injured.

Thompson was shot and killed by two other officers as Thompson charged them with the ax, Bratton said.

The commissioner said that Thompson had converted to Islam two years ago.

“The father indicated to us he believed his son several years ago converted to become a Muslim, a self-proclaimed Muslim,” Bratton said.

Deputy Commissioner John Miller, who is in charge of counterterrorism for the department, said a review of Thompson’s computer showed that he had visited websites affiliated with radical groups, including al Qaeda, ISIS and al Shabaab.

“It appears from the electronic forensic piece of this, this is something he has been thinking about and thinking about with more intensity in recent days,” Miller said.

He said Thompson was “self radicalized, self directed.”

When asked if the ax assault was an act of terrorism, Miller said, “It appears at this point that it was in his mind.”

He also said there was no indication that anyone else was involved.

The ax attack occurred the day after a lone gunman shot and killed a Canadian solider in Ottawa before he was shot dead by the Parliament’s Sergeant in Arms.

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(JERUSALEM) — An American teen from New Orleans was shot and killed during clashes in the West Bank village of Silwad near Ramallah Friday.

Orwa Abd al-Wahhab Hammad, 15, was born in Ramallah and moved with his family to New Orleans, according to his brother Mohammad. His mother and brothers had traveled with him to the West Bank and his father will arrive from the United States on Sunday for the funeral.

The State Department confirms Orwa was a U.S. citizen, and says officials from the Consulate General in Jerusalem are in contact with family and providing all consular assistance.

Orwa is the second American child to die in the region this week. On Wednesday, 3-month old Chaya Zissel Braun was killed in Jerusalem when a Palestinian man drove his car into a crowd of pedestrians at a transit stop. Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld described the incident as a “terrorist attack.” Her parents had traveled to Israel from Rockland County, New York, so her father could study in a yeshiva.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — There are 846 doctors and dentists in 43 states who have been named by the U.S. Department of Education on a public list in a desperate effort to get them to repay their defaulted student loans.

And because the loans were federally guaranteed, it’s taxpayers who are left with the bill.

“Physicians have a higher calling in the community. They have a higher responsibility,” Tom Schatz of Citizens Against Government Waste told ABC News’ 20/20. “The Hippocratic Oath says, ‘Do no harm.’ Why should they be doing harm to taxpayers?”

Many of the doctors appear to be living lives of luxury and operate practices in high rent places, including Malibu, California, or Key Biscayne, Florida. But the doctors on the list have collectively defaulted on over $100 million in student loans.

Congress created the federally guaranteed loan program for aspiring doctors in the 1970s, but because of the high default rate, it pulled the plug on the program in the 1990s.

That’s when the government decided to publicize the list to shame doctors into paying up. The government has also seized doctors’ tax refunds, prevented the doctors from participating in Medicare, filed lawsuits and even garnished bank accounts.

“They were more likely to pay the money back because it’s embarrassing to them professionally,” Schatz said.

ABC’s New York station WABC launched its own investigation and tracked down several doctors on the list, including Brooklyn dentist Sammy Saadia, who owes $156,000, and Montclair, New Jersey, podiatrist Demi Turner, who owes almost $700,000, according to the Department of Education.

“They continue to practice medicine. They make money, and there’s absolutely no legitimate reason not to pay that money back,” Schatz said.

Dentist Mladen Kralj is one of the doctors on the list. He runs a dental practice in the penthouse of an office building in Chicago’s Gold Coast section. Kralj owes the government over $394,107, yet he had the money to buy two condos in a renovated loft building in downtown Chicago.

“I’m actually in repayment form with them. I’ve had some issues here,” Kralj said when confronted by 20/20.

Kralj’s loans date back over 23 years. He was sued by the Justice Department and was ordered to pay back the money.

But as of today, Kralj’s outstanding debt is bigger than ever because of principle and interest. Kralj told 20/20 that he went through tough times after losing an investor in his business. He said he hasn’t been paid in nine months.

“There’s circumstances in my life that are very sensitive that happened during this part, that I’ve never been able to catch up on,” Kralj said. “I’m trying to take responsibility for all of this simply because it’s caught up. And the thing is, trying to maintain a practice and trying to pay off loans and trying to get ahead, it’s difficult.”

Over the years, being on the public list has largely worked. Many doctors and dentists on the list have paid back thousands of dollars, leaving only the stalwart holdouts, like leading podiatrist and sports medicine specialist Dr. Scott Kantro.

Kantro, who also made a name for himself as a medical inventor, lives in an upscale home on five acres of property in New York. But according to the list, he currently owes $287,819 for loans he took out in 1979.

While he refused to speak to 20/20 on camera, Kantro claimed he had actually paid his debt off 30 years ago and that it was all a mistake. But when 20/20 asked for his permission to check out his story with the government, he refused.

“There’s some level of sympathy, perhaps, at this point, but not over this long period of time.” Schatz said. “It means that resources have been spent by the government to even get to this point. Thirty percent of these people have been on since 1995. That’s a really long time to keep fighting and not paying.”

Click here to find out if your doctor or dentist is on the list. Then tune in for the full story on ABC News’ 20/20 Friday at 10 p.m. ET.

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ABC News(MARYSVILLE, Wash.) — Two people are confirmed dead, including the suspected shooter, after a reported school shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in Washington state, police said.

The Marysville Police Department and the FBI responded to the school, which is about 40 miles north of Seattle, to initiate evacuations.

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Eyewitness Alyx Peitzsch told KOMO that she was in the cafeteria when the shooting started and she heard four gunshots.

She estimated that there were perhaps 50 people in the cafeteria when the shooting started but she ran out of the room as soon as she heard the gunshots.

Peitzsch said, “I saw them point it at the feet of the students and I ran first to the wall and I’m like, ‘I’m not staying in here,’ so I ran out and called my mom.”

Bree Grinde has two children in the school and spoke to both of them.

“They’re hiding under desks, in closets, anywhere that they can,” Grinde said. “I’m very concerned. I’ve got two kids in there. I know that they’re ok. I’m just really concerned about all the other kids and what’s going on right now.”

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ABC News(MARYSVILLE, Wash.) — A suspected shooter was dead at the scene of a reported school shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in Washington state, police said.

The Marysville Police Department and the FBI responded to the school, which is about 40 miles north of Seattle.

Police were clearing school buildings to ensure there was no ongoing threat, an official said.

Marysville Police Commander Robb Lamoureux says students are still being evacuated, but at this point, police believe the gunman was the only casualty.

“We are not aware of any other injuries at this time but that has not been confirmed because we are still clearing the buildings,” Lamoureux said.

Eyewitness Alyx Peitzsch told KOMO that she was in the cafeteria when the shooting started and she heard four gunshots.

She estimated that there were perhaps 50 people in the cafeteria when the shooting started but she ran out of the room as soon as she heard the gunshots.

Peitzsch said, “I saw them point it at the feet of the students and I ran first to the wall and I’m like, ‘I’m not staying in here,’ so I ran out and called my mom.”

Bree Grinde has two children in the school and spoke to both of them.

“They’re hiding under desks, in closets, anywhere that they can,” Grinde said. “I’m very concerned. I’ve got two kids in there. I know that they’re ok. I’m just really concerned about all the other kids and what’s going on right now.”

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ABC News(MARYSVILLE, Wash.) — A suspected shooter was dead at the scene of a reported school shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in Washington state, police said.

The Marysville Police Department and the FBI responded to the school, which is about 40 miles north of Seattle.

Police were clearing school buildings to ensure there was no ongoing threat, an official said.

Marysville Police Commander Robb Lamoureux says students are still being evacuated, but at this point, police believe the gunman was the only casualty.

“We are not aware of any other injuries at this time but that has not been confirmed because we are still clearing the buildings,” Lamoureux said.

Eyewitness Alyx Peitzsch told KOMO that she was in the cafeteria when the shooting started and she heard four gunshots.

She estimated that there were perhaps 50 people in the cafeteria when the shooting started but she ran out of the room as soon as she heard the gunshots.

Peitzsch said, “I saw them point it at the feet of the students and I ran first to the wall and I’m like, ‘I’m not staying in here,’ so I ran out and called my mom.”

Bree Grinde has two children in the school and spoke to both of them.

“They’re hiding under desks, in closets, anywhere that they can,” Grinde said. “I’m very concerned. I’ve got two kids in there. I know that they’re ok. I’m just really concerned about all the other kids and what’s going on right now.”

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Getty Images(OTTAWA, Ontario) — Canadian intelligence and law enforcement officers are “reevaluating” some 90 people they suspect are linked to terrorist groups in the wake of the deadly shooting near Canada’s Parliament, but the nation’s top cop said that unfortunately for him, no arrests are on the immediate horizon.

“We’re reevaluating all of our individuals to make sure that those that present the greatest sort of risk are assessed and [officers] have resources attributed to them either to do surveillance, focus on the investigation, to get evidence, to make arrests,” Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Commissioner Bob Paulson told reporters Thursday. “We have not made arrests today. We do not have any intention of making imminent arrests. Generally, I would like to say that I have intentions of making lots of arrests, but in terms of the evidence and as the evidence is collected and the cases are built, we will be making arrests.”

Gunman Michael Zehaf-Bibeau was shot and killed by security forces Wednesday after he opened fire with a small caliber rifle in Canada’s Parliament in Ottawa. Minutes earlier, police say Zehaf-Bibeau had gunned down a uniformed soldier, Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, at a nearby national war monument.

Though Zehaf-Bibeau, was not one of the nearly 100 suspects that the northern nation had been watching — and police say the only known link between him and other jihadis is an email found on another accused terrorist’s hard drive — the case prompted Paulson and other top Canadian officials to question the nation’s current domestic anti-terrorism posture.

“…[W]e live in a dangerous world. Terrorism has been here with us for a while, and dangerously close on a number of occasions…We will not be intimidated. We will be vigilant, but we will not run scared. We will be prudent, but we will not panic,” Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper told Parliament Thursday, a day after he and other lawmakers had been within feet of the rifle-wielding gunman. “As members know, in recent weeks I have been saying that our laws and police powers need to be strengthened in the area of surveillance, detention, and arrest. They need to be much strengthened.”

Paulson wondered aloud about legally lowering the bar for taking law enforcement action against suspects.

“I understand that sort of we need to look at all options in terms of trying to deal with this sort of difficult and hard to understand threat and balance that against what we’ve seen in previous engagements with this threat, that we are able to act, you know, decisively, quickly, preventatively, and perhaps on a threshold that is somewhat lower,” he said during his press conference. “You know, without throwing somebody in jail forever, but being able to act decisively at a point where the suspicion is realized.”

Speaking next to Paulson, Ottawa Police Chief Charles Bordeleau said he has seen a “gap evolve over law enforcement’s ability to maintain control over these individuals that are being radicalized.”

Canada is hardly the only Western nation struggling with what to do about a number of citizens in country linked to terror groups abroad — including a growing number of Westerners who have traveled to Syria and Iraq to join in the fight for or against the terrorist group the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). ABC News reported back in January that the FBI was already watching dozens of people who had fought in Syria and returned to the U.S.

British intelligence suspects that hundreds of its citizens have traveled to Syria to fight and last week law enforcement there announced terrorism charges against four men that had been arrested in London in the two weeks previous. The men, police alleged, had conducted “hostile reconnaissance” on an English police station and military base, had purchased a firearm and silencer and had reams of “jihadi material” on their computers.

The same day as that announcement, Metropolitan Police’s National Policing Lead for Counter Terrorism Assistant Commissioner Mark Rowley wrote separately on the MET website that the MET has made over 200 arrests this year alone and is running “exceptionally high numbers of counter-terrorism investigations, the likes of which we have not seen for several years.”

Rowley too spoke about the delicate balance between disrupting potentially deadly plots and gathering enough evidence against the suspects.

“Public safety is our number one priority and we will always focus our disruption activity against those posing the greatest and most imminent threat. Sometimes this means intervening very early — essential to prevent attacks, but presenting enormous challenges in securing sufficient evidence to charge,” he wrote.

In the U.S., reports of the rise in domestic terrorism investigations came on the heels of startling revelations about the National Security Agency’s pervasive foreign and domestic surveillance programs, adding fuel to an already raging debate about the balance between civil liberties and national security — a debate not restricted by America’s northern border, as Canada was already considering conservative legislation to strengthen its security forces.

Thomas Mulcair, leader of Canada’s opposition New Democratic party, spoke immediately after the Prime Minister Thursday.

“[The attack] has only strengthened our commitment to each other and to a peaceful world. Let us not become more suspicious of our neighbors. Let us not be driven by fear because in Canada, love always triumphs over hate,” he said.

Then Justin Trudeau, head of the Liberty Party, added, “We are a proud democracy, a welcoming and peaceful nation. We are a country of open arms, open minds, and open hearts. We are a nation of fairness, justice and the rule of law.”

“We will not be intimidated into changing that, by anybody. These are instead the very values and ideals upon which we must rely in the days ahead…[Those who perpetrate attacks] are criminals, and criminals will not dictate how we act as a nation, how we govern ourselves, or how we treat each other. They will not dictate our values,” he said.

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Getty Images(OTTAWA, Ontario) — Canadian intelligence and law enforcement officers are “reevaluating” some 90 people they suspect are linked to terrorist groups in the wake of the deadly shooting near Canada’s Parliament, but the nation’s top cop said that unfortunately for him, no arrests are on the immediate horizon.

“We’re reevaluating all of our individuals to make sure that those that present the greatest sort of risk are assessed and [officers] have resources attributed to them either to do surveillance, focus on the investigation, to get evidence, to make arrests,” Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) Commissioner Bob Paulson told reporters Thursday. “We have not made arrests today. We do not have any intention of making imminent arrests. Generally, I would like to say that I have intentions of making lots of arrests, but in terms of the evidence and as the evidence is collected and the cases are built, we will be making arrests.”

Gunman Michael Zehaf-Bibeau was shot and killed by security forces Wednesday after he opened fire with a small caliber rifle in Canada’s Parliament in Ottawa. Minutes earlier, police say Zehaf-Bibeau had gunned down a uniformed soldier, Cpl. Nathan Cirillo, at a nearby national war monument.

Though Zehaf-Bibeau, was not one of the nearly 100 suspects that the northern nation had been watching — and police say the only known link between him and other jihadis is an email found on another accused terrorist’s hard drive — the case prompted Paulson and other top Canadian officials to question the nation’s current domestic anti-terrorism posture.

“…[W]e live in a dangerous world. Terrorism has been here with us for a while, and dangerously close on a number of occasions…We will not be intimidated. We will be vigilant, but we will not run scared. We will be prudent, but we will not panic,” Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper told Parliament Thursday, a day after he and other lawmakers had been within feet of the rifle-wielding gunman. “As members know, in recent weeks I have been saying that our laws and police powers need to be strengthened in the area of surveillance, detention, and arrest. They need to be much strengthened.”

Paulson wondered aloud about legally lowering the bar for taking law enforcement action against suspects.

“I understand that sort of we need to look at all options in terms of trying to deal with this sort of difficult and hard to understand threat and balance that against what we’ve seen in previous engagements with this threat, that we are able to act, you know, decisively, quickly, preventatively, and perhaps on a threshold that is somewhat lower,” he said during his press conference. “You know, without throwing somebody in jail forever, but being able to act decisively at a point where the suspicion is realized.”

Speaking next to Paulson, Ottawa Police Chief Charles Bordeleau said he has seen a “gap evolve over law enforcement’s ability to maintain control over these individuals that are being radicalized.”

Canada is hardly the only Western nation struggling with what to do about a number of citizens in country linked to terror groups abroad — including a growing number of Westerners who have traveled to Syria and Iraq to join in the fight for or against the terrorist group the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). ABC News reported back in January that the FBI was already watching dozens of people who had fought in Syria and returned to the U.S.

British intelligence suspects that hundreds of its citizens have traveled to Syria to fight and last week law enforcement there announced terrorism charges against four men that had been arrested in London in the two weeks previous. The men, police alleged, had conducted “hostile reconnaissance” on an English police station and military base, had purchased a firearm and silencer and had reams of “jihadi material” on their computers.

The same day as that announcement, Metropolitan Police’s National Policing Lead for Counter Terrorism Assistant Commissioner Mark Rowley wrote separately on the MET website that the MET has made over 200 arrests this year alone and is running “exceptionally high numbers of counter-terrorism investigations, the likes of which we have not seen for several years.”

Rowley too spoke about the delicate balance between disrupting potentially deadly plots and gathering enough evidence against the suspects.

“Public safety is our number one priority and we will always focus our disruption activity against those posing the greatest and most imminent threat. Sometimes this means intervening very early — essential to prevent attacks, but presenting enormous challenges in securing sufficient evidence to charge,” he wrote.

In the U.S., reports of the rise in domestic terrorism investigations came on the heels of startling revelations about the National Security Agency’s pervasive foreign and domestic surveillance programs, adding fuel to an already raging debate about the balance between civil liberties and national security — a debate not restricted by America’s northern border, as Canada was already considering conservative legislation to strengthen its security forces.

Thomas Mulcair, leader of Canada’s opposition New Democratic party, spoke immediately after the Prime Minister Thursday.

“[The attack] has only strengthened our commitment to each other and to a peaceful world. Let us not become more suspicious of our neighbors. Let us not be driven by fear because in Canada, love always triumphs over hate,” he said.

Then Justin Trudeau, head of the Liberty Party, added, “We are a proud democracy, a welcoming and peaceful nation. We are a country of open arms, open minds, and open hearts. We are a nation of fairness, justice and the rule of law.”

“We will not be intimidated into changing that, by anybody. These are instead the very values and ideals upon which we must rely in the days ahead…[Those who perpetrate attacks] are criminals, and criminals will not dictate how we act as a nation, how we govern ourselves, or how we treat each other. They will not dictate our values,” he said.

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ABC News(MARYSVILLE, Wash.) — Authorities are responding to reports of shots fired Friday morning at Marysville Pilchuck High School in Marysville, Washington.

KOMO reports that three people were injured and two were airlifted to hospitals.

The high school is being evacuated. The school reportedly has about 2,700 students.

Student Alyx Peitzsch says she was in the cafeteria when she heard four shots and turned to see a gunman pointing a weapon at a table of students.

“I saw them point it at the feet of the students and I ran first to the wall and I’m like, ‘I’m not staying in here,’ so I ran out and called my mom,” Peitzsch said.

Bree Grinde has two children in the school and spoke to both of them.

They’re hiding under desks, in closets, anywhere that they can,” Grine said. “I’m very concerned. I’ve got two kids in there. I know that they’re ok. I’m just really concerned about all the other kids and what’s going on right now.”

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