Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Facebook’s data-hungry mobile app is now available in a slimmed-down size and is being targeted to Android users in emerging markets.

Taking up just 252 KB, the Facebook Lite app is designed to work efficiently on a 2G network and areas with limited service, providing users with a stripped-down Facebook experience.

Facebook told ABC News in a statement that the company is testing the app.

Users of the app, which is available for download in the Google Play store, can expect to see fast-loading news feed stories, photos and notifications from friends, making it ideal for people with limited data plans.

“Keeping up with friends is faster than ever. Facebook is free and always will be,” a description of the app reads in the Google Play store.

Connecting the world has been a major goal for CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his team behind the Internet.org initiative. The group has been rolling out free, limited mobile Internet access to people in developing countries, which includes the Facebook app.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Early detection of high cholesterol could be a major help in minimizing the development of heart disease, researchers said.

According to a study published in the journal Circulation, adults in their 30s and 40s may want to begin monitoring their cholesterol. Researchers looked at more than 1,400 healthy individuals who were split into groups based on whether they did not have high cholesterol, had had high cholesterol for one to 10 years or had had high cholesterol for 11 to 20 years. The individuals who had dealt with high cholesterol for a longer period of time were significantly more likely to develop heart disease later in life.

At a 15-year follow-up with researchers, coronary heart disease was recorded at a 4.4-percent rate among those who had not suffered from high cholesterol by age 55. That figure jumped to 8.1 percent for those who had had high cholesterol for one to 10 years and 16.5 percent for those who had dealt with high cholesterol levels for more than 11 years.

The study did not make recommendations for whether younger adults should be given a cholesterol-lowering medication.

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President Obama and Gov. Christie at a shelter for those displaced by Hurricane Sandy, in Brigantine, N.J. Pete Souza / The White House(TRENTON, N.J.) — New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has dealt with his fair share of natural disasters. With a nasty blizzard heading towards the Garden State Monday, he declared the 15th weather-related state of emergency since he took office in January 2010.

“We’re tough in this state; we’ve been through plenty of things before. So have I,” Christie said during a press conference urging residents to prepare before the storm hits.

Each hurricane, flood or related crisis has the side effect, however unintended, of providing the possible 2016 contender an opportunity to demonstrate his leadership style.

Here, in chronological order, are five key weather-related moments during Christie’s tenure:

1. The Disney World Blizzard – 2010

Christie came under fire when he stayed on vacation at Florida’s Disney World during a brutal December snowstorm, rather than coming home to lead his state’s response. To make matters worse, his lieutenant governor Kim Guadagno was also vacationing at the time, leaving Steve Sweeney, the Democratic state Senate president, in charge. Christie defended himself by saying the state would have responded the same way regardless of where he was, and that he didn’t want to break a promise to his children to visit the most magical place on Earth.

2. “Get the hell off the beach” – 2011

Christie flaunted his signature tough-talking style when he called for a mandatory evacuation of points on the Jersey Shore in the run-up to Hurricane Irene. “Do not waste any more time working on your tan. Get off the beach, get out of your beach houses and get to safer lands,” he said, expressing frustration over news coverage of people catching rays despite severe weather warnings. His performance impressed conservative blogger Jennifer Rubin, who at the time said Christie’s stewardship of this storm reflected a “kinder, gentler and more paternal Chris Christie.”

3. Sandy bipartisanship – 2012

The devastating late-October hurricane, which killed 117 people per a CDC analysis and destroyed thousands of homes, will likely remain one of the most defining periods in Christie’s administration. Politically, it was memorable in part because Christie warmly welcomed President Obama to tour storm damage on the Jersey Shore, praising him for his rapid mobilization of federal assets and coordination with the state. “He has worked incredibly closely with me since before the storm hit…It’s been a great working relationship,” Christie said during the October 31 visit. While Christie’s overture earned him bipartisan praise for seeming to put politics aside in the interest of his state (and some state polls had his approval rating soaring) he upset many national Republicans, some of whom later suggested his harmony with the president might have contributed to Romney’s ballot box loss just four days later. Longtime Iowa political operative Doug Gross was quoted by the New York Times as saying it might hurt Christie with Iowa caucus voters, who, Gross said, “don’t forget things like this.”

4. Swiping at other leaders – 2010, 2012

Christie has never shied from defending himself against criticism, especially coming from fellow tri-state leaders over his response to a storm. After former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani tweaked Christie for staying in Florida during a 2010 blizzard (see #1), the New Jersey governor shot back on Fox News. “It’s easy when you are out of office to be shooting from the peanut gallery when you no longer have any responsibility, but I have a responsibility to my family…I’m just going to chalk it off to a bad morning for the mayor. Maybe he didn’t have a good breakfast or something like that,” Christie said. He also blasted Atlantic City Mayor Lorenzo Langford during Hurricane Sandy for allowing residents to shelter locally rather than evacuate the area. Christie and Giuliani seem to have made up since their 2010 spat, as Giuliani campaigned with Christie last year and called him “one of the best governors in the United States.”

5. Canceling the party – 2014, 2015

Whether as a result of the backlash over his Disney trip in 2010 or not, Christie has recently bowed out of several political events due to winter storms. The governor canceled his own re-election celebration in January 2014 over concerns that bad weather could lead to road hazards, and skipped ceremonies in Ohio and Illinois this month as part of his tour congratulating Republican governors which has also taken him through, coincidentally or not, key presidential primary and battleground states including Florida and Iowa.

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JaysonPhotography/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Wall Street stayed mostly level on Monday, finishing the day slightly up, amidst reports detailing a shrinking budget deficit.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 6.1 to 17678.70.

The Nasdaq climbed 13.88 to 4771.76, while the S&P 500 closed the session at 2057.09, up 5.27 from its open.

The Congressional Budget Office said on Monday that the budget deficit is projected to decrease in 2015, to the lowest point since President Obama took office. Overall, the deficit is expected to hold steady relative to the size of the economy through 2018. Beyond 2018, however, the CBO warns that rising deficits could gradually boost the deficit again.

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Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Car service app Uber is capping its prices in New York City due to the major nor’easter snow storm.

In New York City, it’s illegal to “price gouge” in a natural disaster, so Uber says its prices will not exceed 2.8 times the normal fare, due to the state of emergency declared in the Big Apple. In Boston, Uber prices are capped at 2.9 times the normal fare, the company said.

How did Uber choose that price cap? The company explains that as its national policy, when a state of emergency or disaster is declared, its “dynamic pricing” will be capped at a price that excludes the three highest-priced, non-emergency days of the preceding two months.

“This reflects Uber’s national policy developed with New York Attorney General [Eric] Schneiderman that balances the goal of reliable transportation options with affordability during disasters: Anytime a disaster or state of emergency strikes, dynamic pricing is capped and all Uber proceeds will be donated to the American Red Cross to support relief efforts,” Uber said in an email to New York City customers.

Similar emails notifying customers about surge pricing caps are sent to each city or state where a state of emergency is declared, a spokeswoman for Uber told ABC News.

Meanwhile, competitor Lyft said its “Prime Time” pricing will be capped at 200 percent as usual.

“We’ve also communicated to drivers that they should only drive if they feel safe to do so,” the Lyft spokeswoman said.

Both companies say they allow pricing fares to increase to incentivize more drivers to meet high demand.

Uber is warning customers that demand for rides may be higher and wait times may be longer than usual.

However, with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio’s instituting an 11 p.m. curfew on non-emergency vehicles on New York City roads, it’s not clear how many Uber or Lyft cars will be on the road.

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Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — A federal appeals court granted bond to former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell pending an appeal of his conviction on corruption charges.

McDonnell was convicted in September 2014 on 11 of 13 charges. Prosecutors said that McDonnell, while governor, traded favors in exchange for $177,000 in gifts and loans from a wealthy friend who was trying to promote a business.

A statement from a spokesman for McDonnell’s legal team said that the appeal “will be a strong one, and many such cases have been overturned on the grounds that the nature of the ‘official acts’ weren’t indeed illegal.” The spokesman also said that the appeal will likely take longer than McDonnell’s two-year sentence.

The court found that McDonnell “is not likely to flee or pose a danger to the safety of any other person or community fi released.” Further, the court documents say, “the appeal is not for the purpose of delay.”

Opening briefs in the appeal trial are scheduled for March 2, with oral arguments slated for May 12.

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Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — A federal appeals court granted bond to former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell pending an appeal of his conviction on corruption charges.

McDonnell was convicted in September 2014 on 11 of 13 charges. Prosecutors said that McDonnell, while governor, traded favors in exchange for $177,000 in gifts and loans from a wealthy friend who was trying to promote a business.

A statement from a spokesman for McDonnell’s legal team said that the appeal “will be a strong one, and many such cases have been overturned on the grounds that the nature of the ‘official acts’ weren’t indeed illegal.” The spokesman also said that the appeal will likely take longer than McDonnell’s two-year sentence.

The court found that McDonnell “is not likely to flee or pose a danger to the safety of any other person or community fi released.” Further, the court documents say, “the appeal is not for the purpose of delay.”

Opening briefs in the appeal trial are scheduled for March 2, with oral arguments slated for May 12.

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Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — A federal appeals court granted bond to former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell pending an appeal of his conviction on corruption charges.

McDonnell was convicted in September 2014 on 11 of 13 charges. Prosecutors said that McDonnell, while governor, traded favors in exchange for $177,000 in gifts and loans from a wealthy friend who was trying to promote a business.

A statement from a spokesman for McDonnell’s legal team said that the appeal “will be a strong one, and many such cases have been overturned on the grounds that the nature of the ‘official acts’ weren’t indeed illegal.” The spokesman also said that the appeal will likely take longer than McDonnell’s two-year sentence.

The court found that McDonnell “is not likely to flee or pose a danger to the safety of any other person or community fi released.” Further, the court documents say, “the appeal is not for the purpose of delay.”

Opening briefs in the appeal trial are scheduled for March 2, with oral arguments slated for May 12.

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iStock/Thinkstock(ATHENS, Greece) — While the Greek elections on Sunday were an ocean away, Americans may feel the ripple effects of the anti-austerity Syriza party’s leadership when it comes to their bank accounts and homes.

By voting for the far-left Syriza leader to be their premier, Greeks essentially voted against the measures imposed by European Union leaders. Though their single euro currency, put in place in 1999, likely won’t go away, many Greeks are fed up with 26 percent unemployment and budget cuts that they face.

Kasi Turpin, founder and director of boutique travel company Greece A La Carte, based in Athens, said she is not bothered as a business owner and resident about the election results.

“I think he’s going to negotiate with Europe,” Turpin said of newly-elected premier Alexis Tsipras. “A lot of what he promised was rhetoric so he could get elected, though a lot of people are expecting him to raise minimum wage today and alleviate taxes.”

Peter Morici, professor at University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business, said shifting European politics may have a depressing effect on U.S. interest rates. That’s because uncertainty about the euro will cause Europeans to send money to the U.S., and that could push up stock prices and push down interest rates, he said.

“As the Federal Reserve raises rates this summer, the impact on mortgage rates will be more limited because of the uncertainty over the euro,” he said.

Many economists expect the U.S. central bank to raise interest rates, “unless the economy falls apart,” said Morici, who travels to Europe each summer. He added that he doesn’t expect many effects on tourists, except for snagging some discounts.

“Right now, because the euro is weak, it’s a good value,” he said.

Booking in advance can supersede any discounts that you may get from the plunging value of the euro against the dollar.

Turpin, who is of Greek descent and was born in Canada, said demand for Greek tourism has thawed since attracting bad press a few years ago — with images of protesters in Athens against austerity measures.

And now, hotel and tourism service inventory may be harder to get due to the pent-up demand and travelers who want to take advantage of the falling euro.

Turpin advises travelers to look beyond the popular destinations of Santorini and Mykonos, such as Crete and Pylos.

“Greece is a country that is mostly surrounded by water. Even if you’re on the mainland of Greece, you’re not even 20 minutes from the water,” she said.

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amana images/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Even if you live in a tiny studio apartment, you can still find a way to stay active indoors until the Blizzard of 2015 blows over.

Grace DeSimone of American College of Sports Medicine Spokeswoman explains how:

Take the Stairs

Indoor stairs and steps can be turned into calorie-blasting machines, DeSimone said. Walking up and down stairs burns an average of about 7 calories per minute, according to the Compendium of Physical Activity. Take them at a jog, and you’ll up the calorie burn to 11 per minute.

Though it’s harder to get the recommended 10,000 steps per day when you’re cooped up indoors, it is possible, especially if you wear a fitness tracking device, she said.

Stairs can also guard against binging, DeSimone pointed out.

“Put all the snacks up high out of reach or down in the basement,” she advised. “That way you have to run up and down the stairs every time you feel like having a cookie.”

Use What You’ve Got

Everything you own can be used for exercise, DeSimone said.

For example, squat up and down in a chair to strengthen your butt and thighs. Or do dips on the edge of the couch to strengthen your arms, shoulders and chest.

“If you’ve got weights or bands, great, but if not you can use laundry bottles or cans for strength work,” she said. “If your kids are small enough, even they can be used for bench presses.”

Find an App

There is an app for any possible fitness goal you might have and many of them are free, DeSimone said.

“Download one, use it, delete it and try another one,” she said, adding that many take into account tight spaces and lack of equipment.

If you’re not into apps, search the Internet for streaming, downloadable or written workouts. Your gym’s website can be a good resource, she said. Equinox Gyms, for example, offers a free “Do Anywhere” workout complete with demo videos.

Make It a Game

One way to get the whole family up and moving is with a rousing game of balloon volleyball, DeSimone said.

“Trying to keep the balloon from hitting the floor is a lot harder than it looks. It burns calories and wears everyone out,” she said.

Break Out the Shovel

You may not be looking forward to shoveling your sidewalk or driveway once the storm is over, but DeSimone said you should be if you’re interested in getting a great workout. Besides burning up to 640 calories an hour, cleaning your walk works virtually every muscle in your body.

“Just be sure to switch sides every few minutes so you don’t get a backache,” she said.

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