iStock/Thinkstock(BULAWAYO, Zimbabwe) — Cecil the Lion’s brother, Jericho, was shot and killed Saturday, the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force said, in the wake of Zimbabwe calling for the extradition of the American dentist who admitted killing Cecil in early July.

“It is with huge disgust and sadness that we have just been informed that Jericho, Cecil’s brother has been killed at 4pm today,” the Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force said in a Facebook post. “We are absolutely heart broken.”

Walter Palmer, the Minnesota dentist who admitted to killing Cecil the Lion in Zimbabwe, said in a statement earlier this week that he “deeply” regretted the pursuit of the early July hunt in Zimbabwe that “resulted in the taking of this lion.” He added that he “had no idea” Cecil the lion was a “known, local favorite, was collared and part of a study.”

“I hired several professional guides and they secured all proper permits,” Palmer said in his statement. “To my knowledge, everything about this trip was legal and properly handled and conducted.”

In the U.S., a petition to extradite Palmer began July 28, and quickly surpassed 100,000 signatures. The White House has not responded to the petition.

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iStock/Thinkstock(TOULOUSE, France) — With authorities “increasingly confident” the airplane debris recovered Wednesday comes from MH370, the jet that vanished over the Indian Ocean last year, official analysis of the part is set to begin on Wednesday in Toulouse, France.

Engineers have tentatively identified the part as a “flaperon” from a Boeing 777, the same plane as Malaysia Flight MH370.

In Toulouse, investigators will attempt to definitively link the debris to the ill-fated jet, and search for clues about the plane’s final moments.

According to industry experts like Bill Waldock, a professor of safety science at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, investigators will likely clean the jet, and then examine its surface, first with a magnifying glass, then potentially through ultrasound technology.

They’ll look for tiny fractures in the surface, which could reveal the jet’s angle of impact, says Waldock.

An ultrasound could show “just how violent the separation was,” the professor tells ABC News.

Based on preliminary photographs of the recently recovered debris, some experts believe the plane hit the water relatively slowly, with the flaps pointed down, which would suggest there was someone consciously manipulating the controls when the plane went down. However, there’s also a chance that it suffered a high speed, nose-first crash.

Though the recovered piece could give investigators hints about what happened to the jet, “it certainly doesn’t address how it happened or why,” Waldock told ABC.

Investigators may also examine the marine life that attached itself to the flaperon during its 16-month journey across the Indian Ocean.

There’s a chance that the species attached to the part could help investigators more closely estimate the crash site, which is likely thousands of miles away from where the part eventually washed up. The age of the barnacles could also help investigators more definitively link the piece to MH370.

If investigators conclude the flaperon is from MH370, “this confirms the airplane crashed — and that removes any hope” that the passengers survived, Waldock says. “It is the proof that the airplane crashed, that’s the significance.”

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) — The 2016 Republican primary is on course to become the most crowded in modern presidential history.

The GOP now has 17 major contenders for the nomination — former Virginia Gov. Jim Gilmore announced on Wednesday — breaking the record previously held by the 16 candidates who sought the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination in 1972.

Counting presidential contenders isn’t an exact science, however. There are hundreds of candidates each election cycle that run for president. And the term “major” is, of course, subjective.

But it’s clear that 2016 is shaping up to be a record-setting election cycle. To understand why, it’s important to know a little history about the presidential nominating process.

According to Sidney Milkis, a professor of politics at the University of Virginia and the Miller Center, the 1948 Republican primary holds the record for the most candidates, 15, vying for the presidential nomination before the modern primary system was established. (Ultimately, the GOP nomination went to New York Gov. Thomas Dewey who lost to Harry Truman).

But something happened in 1968 to change everything.

The chaos of the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago spurred a restructuring of rules and regulations that made the selection process more democratic, opting for caucuses and primaries instead of concentrating power in party leaders.

This shift in selection helped break down some of the traditional barriers to entry for potential presidential contenders.

Bruce Schulman, the chair of the history department at Boston University, told ABC News that the 2016 cycle may be the “height of officially declared candidates.” That’s because we now have a campaign finance system that requires candidates to declare their candidacy, Schulman says.

While the formal declaration of candidacy helps explain the record-setting size of the 2016 GOP pool, there are a variety of other developments that make this year’s race ripe for competition.

One of them, Milkis says, is the ability of corporations to finance political candidates following the Citizens United Supreme Court decision in 2010. Milkis said this turned campaign finance into a “wild west kind of frontier.”

“If you have one donor,” he added, “they can keep you in the game for the long run.”

The 2016 election also allows the Republican party to take advantage of a White House with no incumbent.

Jim Lengle, an associate professor of government at Georgetown University, told ABC News that “the party that controls the White House for two consecutive terms nearly always loses,” in the next election, “so anyone in the Republican party with presidential aspirations sees 2016 as a great opportunity to win,” provided history repeats itself.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — For weeks, President Obama has had the ear of Democrats on the Iran nuclear agreement, meeting with members one-on-one and dispatching his advisers to hearings and briefings on Capitol Hill.

But with members leaving town until September, the administration is losing its greatest asset in the lobbying campaign: proximity.

“The recess is not good for the administration,” Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Calif., said recently after an administration briefing.

The campaign has yielded some crucial endorsements, with supporters confident the president has enough votes to sustain a veto of a resolution of disapproval.

“More and more of them have confirmed to me that they will be there to sustain the veto,” House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said Thursday.

But now, members will hear from constituents and outside groups arrayed on both sides of the deal.

“[The administration has] the most incredible home field advantage ever for the first two innings,” Sherman said. “For the other seven innings it’s on a neutral field.”

“There will certainly be an intensive lobbying campaign by both sides during August recess,” said Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, who has not yet announced his position.

The American Israel Public Affairs Committee, which opposes the deal, has a massive campaign underway to sway members, including hundreds of meetings with congressional offices and plans to send activists to key districts and town hall meetings across the country.

The group’s educational wing is also sending roughly 50 members to Israel next week for its annual summer trip, where they’ll meet with Israeli political leaders. Democrats will be led by Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., who has not yet decided whether to support the deal.

Citizens for a Nuclear Free Iran, a pro-Israel group financially supported by AIPAC, has a multi-million dollar national ad campaign underway in 35 states.

“The more that people look at this deal, the less they support it,” said spokesman Patrick Dorton. “We hope that the American public and members of Congress will look at all the fine print and details.”

Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., an undecided, pro-Israel member who met one-on-one with President Obama Wednesday afternoon, acknowledged that it would be “difficult to be on the other side” of Israel and AIPAC.

“I’m going to try to ignore the politics, and I’m going to try and ignore my own emotions,” he said Thursday after meeting with President Obama. “I’m going to do what I think is the right thing.”

Speaking to grassroots supporters of the Iran deal Thursday, the president acknowledged that the recess would be a tougher climate to woo members.

“They start getting squishy when they feel the political heat,” he said.

While endorsements continue to trickle in — Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., who represents the family of Amir Hekmati, an American imprisoned in Iran, announced his support Thursday — some members have also come out against the deal.

Others are planning to wait until September before making a decision.

“I’m going to take advantage of that adequate review period before announcing where I am,” said Rep. Steve Israel, D-N.Y., who said he’s “skeptical” of the deal.

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Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images(ROME, Italy) — An Sicilian court has found supermodel Naomi Campbell guilty of assault.

A court in Sicily sentenced Campbell to a six month suspended prison term for whacking a photographer in the head with her handbag and scratching his eye.

Paparazzo Gaetano Di Giovanni was snapping pictures of the supermodel after she stepped off a yacht moored on the Sicilian island of Lipari in 2009.

Campbell was strolling with her Russian billioniare boyfriend Vladimir Doronin when she erupted in fury at the photographer.

Di Giovanni says the eye scratch required medical attention and took three days to heal.

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tarabird/iStock/ThinkStock(NEW YORK) — Stocks moved lower, to end the month, as investors assessed the latest batch of company earnings.

The Dow closed down 55 points, the NASDAQ fell a fractiona nd the S&P gave up 5 points.

Energy stocks were among the biggest losers. Exxon and Chevron dragged the Dow down more than 50 points.

Healthcare stocks, however, were among the biggest gainers.

Companies may be hiring, but they’re not necessarily paying the workers they already had, more money. The government says wages and benefits grew just two-tenths of a percent this past spring, the slowest pace in 27 years.

Some real life heroes rang the closing bell on the New York Stock Exchange – New York City firefighters to mark the department’s 150th anniversary.

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tarabird/iStock/ThinkStock(NEW YORK) — Stocks moved lower, to end the month, as investors assessed the latest batch of company earnings.

The Dow closed down 55 points, the NASDAQ fell a fractiona nd the S&P gave up 5 points.

Energy stocks were among the biggest losers. Exxon and Chevron dragged the Dow down more than 50 points.

Healthcare stocks, however, were among the biggest gainers.

Companies may be hiring, but they’re not necessarily paying the workers they already had, more money. The government says wages and benefits grew just two-tenths of a percent this past spring, the slowest pace in 27 years.

Some real life heroes rang the closing bell on the New York Stock Exchange – New York City firefighters to mark the department’s 150th anniversary.

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Frank Lombardi Jr/iStock/ThinkStock(ROME, Italy) — A report by the Association for Industrial Development in southern Italy shows that the region south of Rome are the poorest in the Eurozone.

Employment in southern Italy, long plagued by corruption and organized crime, is lower than in any country in the European Union, at just 40 percent.

Economic growth has been far slower than even that of its troubled neighbor, Greece.

What has saved the south from sinking the rest of country is strong productivity in Italy’s northern regions.

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Pawel Gaul/iStock/ThinkStock(JERUSALEM) — It’s the tiniest grave in the village’s cemetery, just big enough for a bundle nearly two feet long.

Eighteen-month-old Ali Dawabsheh burned to death after Jewish extremists attacked his family today in the Palestinian village of Duma, near Nablus. By Friday night, the Palestinian Justice Ministry autopsy report found soot inside the toddler’s body, confirming he was alive when he caught fire.

Ali’s uncle, Wisam Dawabsheh told ABC News the attackers approached the village in the early hours of Friday and knocked on the windows of the Dawabsheh house. The attackers then hurled molotov cocktails inside, setting fire to the house. Before fleeing, the attackers left the word “Revenge” in Hebrew spray-painted on the house, a so-called “price tag” attack.

Just hours after Ali’s death, villagers were handing out posters plastered with Ali’s face ahead of the funeral. The attack paralleled the killing of 16-year-old Mohammed Abu Khdeir last July who was burned alive by Jewish extremists. Last year, protesters hit the streets following Abu Khdeir’s murder, chanting “Intifada! Intifada!” Friday, there were reports of light clashes throughout the West Bank but no widespread violence.

Palestinian Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah spoke to the funeral Friday, as hundreds of men sat under the midday heat, crying and praying as the tiny body was laid to rest. Ali’s 4-year-old brother, Ahmad and his parents, Saad, 32, and Riham, 27, remain in critical condition at a hospital in Israel.

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Cindy Ord/NBCUniversal Cable Entertainment(LOS ANGELES) — Since Caitlyn Jenner debuted her new look on the cover of Vanity Fair in June, her family has been slowly getting used to her new look. Khloe Kardashian even admitted Thursday that she still calls her step-father, Bruce, Jenner’s name at birth.

“We don’t like to say that Bruce is gone, per se. We, my sisters and I, we will call Caitlyn ‘Bruce,’ and we’ve been told that’s completely fine,” she said on The Project, an Australian TV show. “She has told us we are allowed to call her any name we want to. Because on the phone, when she calls me, it’s the same voice as Bruce. And if I’m not physically with her, it’s hard to remember in the moment that I’m talking to Caitlyn, if that makes sense.”

Kardashian added that the transition has been hard on the family. “There was a hard time for the entire family, that we were all transitioning with her, but in front of an audience,” she explained. “That’s not really the normal way to go about it.”

Continuing, Kardashian said, “There is a lot of raw emotions, that it’s hard to do in front of a camera. For us, we were trying to be really open and raw with it, I think. We all got through it and that’s completely over, it’s all behind us now. So, we are just happy for her. We just want her to be happy. But there was definitely a moment that was really tough for all of us.”

Kardashian clarified that just because she still calls Jenner, Bruce, doesn’t mean she’s not supportive of Jenner’s transition. “It’s a beautiful thing that she’s transitioned,” she said, “and that she is strong enough to have her own voice and wanting to make such monumental, beautiful moves and be that crusader.”

Meanwhile, E! released a new clip from I Am Cait Friday, showing the former Olympian trying to perfect a more feminine voice. In the clip, Jenner’s step-daughter, Kim Kardashian, attempts to help her by having Jenner pretend to order room service at a hotel. When Jenner tries her feminine sound, Kardashian replies, “You sound no different!”

“Sir! What would you like, sir?” Kardashian quipped.

A new episode of I Am Cait airs Sunday at 8 p.m. ET/PT on E!

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