Cliff Hawkins/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The Houston Texans selected defensive end Jadeveon Clowney with the first pick of the NFL Draft Thursday.

While there seemed little doubt to most prognosticators that Clowney would go first, there was at least one person that wasn’t sure of that: Clowney.

“I’m feeling overwhelmed,” said Clowney, who only found out Houston had selected him three minutes before the team’s clock hit zero. “I’m feeling great right now. It’s just a blessing, man. I appreciate it. I’m just glad to be a part of the Houston Texans.”

Clowney becomes the first defensive player to be selected with the first pick since 2006, when the Texans selected defensive end Mario Williams.

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Digital Vision/Thinkstock(KARACHI, Pakistan) — The FBI agent arrested in Pakistan earlier this week was granted bail by a Pakistani court on Thursday.

The agent was reportedly arrested for carrying ammunition in an airport. A Pakistani police official said that during further investigation into the agent, a U.S. national, local authorities discovered 15 9mm bullets, a magazine, three knives, a laptop and other “very sensitive material,” including jamming and other “high-tech” equipment.

The agent was still in jail on Thursday morning, but was expected to be released upon completion of court formalities. His bail was granted against surety bonds worth $9,800 U.S. dollars.

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ABC News(NEW YORK) — A leather-bound book used by Adolf Hitler to document Nazi Germany’s pillage of precious artwork during World War II was donated to the National Archives Thursday, the anniversary of the end of the war in Europe.

The so-called “Hitler Album Six” was a missing volume of a collection that would later be turned against the fuhrer’s lieutenants as evidence during the 1945 Nuremberg trials.

A decayed dark cover and fragile binding belies the treasure trove within: Page after page of photographs of priceless works from some of history’s greatest artists — all of them stolen by Axis forces in Europe.

The album was used by a German task force to systematically catalog their looting of Europe and was prepared for Hitler’s own perusal. Forty-two other such volumes are known to exist and most are stored at the National Archives, but with hundreds of thousands pieces of art and cultural items still believed to be missing from the war, each page could be critical in piecing together the clues to their recovery, officials said.

“The National Archives is becoming the world’s leading resource on Holocaust-era assets and these volumes enhance our role as that resource. Each album lays out further evidence of Hitler’s premeditated theft of art and other cultural treasures,” archivist David Ferriero said at Thursday’s unveiling. “Our history is not a closed chapter. New evidence turns up and gives us more to ponder and study.”

“Album Six” itself disappeared from Hitler’s mansion in the Bavarian Alps during the waning days of the war. An American soldier serving in the region took the book as a memento, not realizing its significance, officials said. It stayed in the veteran’s family and remained in obscurity for decades until his nephew made contact with the Monuments Men Foundation — an organization which seeks to recover lost cultural artifacts of the war. It is named for the original allied forces unit whose mission was to recover those items, recently dramatized in the film The Monuments Men.

Foundation chair Robert Edsel, author of the non-fiction book on which the movie is loosely based, explained the difficulty in recovering lost items from the war. Some were intentionally taken by governments or collectors, others pocketed as an innocent-looking souvenir to the naked eye.

“They were part of the crime scene, but no one understood it as that at the time,” he said.

Also on hand for the ceremony was Harry Ettlinger, a retired Army sergeant and one of the last surviving members of the unit. Ettlinger, a German-American veteran who was the inspiration for the role played by actor Dimitri Leonidas, reflected on returning to the country of his birth during the war.

One of the pieces that the Nazis took a photo of is in a museum in the German city in which Ettlinger was born, he recalled.

“I lived three blocks away from it but was not allowed to see it because I was Jewish,” he said. “And that particular work was of a self-portrait of Rembrandt, so in the Monuments Men I finally got to come home and see it.”

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iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Thursday saw another mixed finish for Wall Street, though a Labor Department report indicated that the job market may be improving even if the stock market largely remains steady.

The Dow Jones Industrial finished at 16,550.97, up 32.43 from Wednesday’s close.

The Nasdaq closed down 16.17 to 4,051.50 while the S&P 500 saw the day come to an end down 2.58 to 1,875.63.

The Labor Department said on Thursday that the number of Americans filing for unemployment benefits dropped by 26,000 last week — this after two consecutive weeks of higher numbers of filings.

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State Department photo/Public Domain(WASHINGTON) — U.S. officials are on the ground in Nigeria to help the government there find the hundreds of girls kidnapped by the terrorist group Boko Haram, Secretary of State John Kerry announced Thursday.

“Our inter-agency team is hitting the ground in Nigeria now, and they are going to be working in concert with President Goodluck Jonathan’s government to do everything that we possibly can to return these girls to their families and their communities,” Kerry said during an appearance with Syrian Opposition Coalition President Ahmad Jarba.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki would not say exactly how many officials were in the first group of American experts and advisers to arrive in Nigeria, but said the final tally will be in the dozens, in addition to the embassy officials already on the ground there.

Psaki said Wednesday that the FBI and USAID are among the agencies that stood ready to provide personnel.

A separate team of seven military experts, dispatched via the Department of Defense, will likely depart on Friday for Nigeria, according to Pentagon officials.

They will provide support in communications, logistics and intelligence, largely out of the U.S. embassy in Abuja, and won’t be actively searching for the missing girls, officials said. An additional team of 11 military officials is already on the ground there.

The U.S. embassies in neighboring Chad and Cameroon have also been coordinating security measures with their host governments, in the event Boko Haram violence, or signs of the girls, cross over the Nigerian border, officials said.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Snapchat agreed on Thursday to settle with the Federal Trade Commission over charges that the mobile messaging app deceived its users.

Snapchat promised users their photo and video messages would “disappear forever” after no more than 10 seconds. However, the FTC said this was a misleading claim since there are several ways a recipient could save snaps indefinitely.

One such way is by using a third-party app to log into Snapchat.

“Because the service’s deletion feature only functions in the official Snapchat app, recipients can use these widely available third-party apps to view and save snaps indefinitely,” the FTC said in a press release Thursday.

The FTC said Snapchat also failed to secure its Find Friends feature, resulting in a security breach that “enabled attackers to compile a database of 4.6 million Snapchat usernames and phone numbers.”

In its blog Thursday, Snapchat said that it had resolved most of the FTC’s concerns over the past year by “improving the wording of our privacy policy, app description, and in-app just-in-time notifications. And we continue to invest heavily in security and countermeasures to prevent abuse.”

“We are devoted to promoting user privacy and giving Snapchatters control over how and with whom they communicate. That’s something we’ve always taken seriously, and always will,” the company added.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Snapchat agreed on Thursday to settle with the Federal Trade Commission over charges that the mobile messaging app deceived its users.

Snapchat promised users their photo and video messages would “disappear forever” after no more than 10 seconds. However, the FTC said this was a misleading claim since there are several ways a recipient could save snaps indefinitely.

One such way is by using a third-party app to log into Snapchat.

“Because the service’s deletion feature only functions in the official Snapchat app, recipients can use these widely available third-party apps to view and save snaps indefinitely,” the FTC said in a press release Thursday.

The FTC said Snapchat also failed to secure its Find Friends feature, resulting in a security breach that “enabled attackers to compile a database of 4.6 million Snapchat usernames and phone numbers.”

In its blog Thursday, Snapchat said that it had resolved most of the FTC’s concerns over the past year by “improving the wording of our privacy policy, app description, and in-app just-in-time notifications. And we continue to invest heavily in security and countermeasures to prevent abuse.”

“We are devoted to promoting user privacy and giving Snapchatters control over how and with whom they communicate. That’s something we’ve always taken seriously, and always will,” the company added.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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iStock Editorial(LONDON) — London’s Metropolitan Police said on Thursday 500 police officers will test wearable cameras made by Taser in hopes the technology will help bring “speedier justice” for victims.

“Our experience of using cameras already shows that people are more likely to plead guilty when they know we have captured the incident. That speeds up justice, puts offenders behind bars more quickly and protects potential victims,” Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe said in a statement.

The Taser AXON Body Camera simply attaches to an officer’s shirt or belt and records continuously on a 30-second loop. The cameras are being worn by officers — or “bobbies” as the Brits call them — in 10 boroughs in London.

The palm-sized camera comes equipped with a 130-degree lens, giving officers a wide field of view, and can continuously record for more than 12 hours under normal battery operation.

There are two ways it can be switched on: simply press a button or slide a switch across the top.

When the camera is rolling, it will save 30 seconds of footage from the loop and continue recording, ensuring officers don’t miss any potential images that could be used as evidence.

The cameras will have a sticker indicating they are recording video and audio, and officers will let people know they’re recording, according to a Metropolitan Police video explaining the devices.

Each pixel on the camera captures light with a sensitivity comparable to the human retina, according to the Taser AXON website, making it easier to see footage from nighttime incidents.

The Metropolitan Police said officers will upload the material from their cameras to a cloud-based server at the end of their shifts. Authorities said the footage will be deleted after 31 days unless there is a request to keep it for evidence.

The cameras are already in use in some U.S. cities, including Rialto, California. According to data posted on Taser’s website, the local police department in Rialto reported an 87.5 percent decrease in complaints and a 59 percent decline in the use of force one year after the cameras were implemented.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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iStock Editorial(LONDON) — London’s Metropolitan Police said on Thursday 500 police officers will test wearable cameras made by Taser in hopes the technology will help bring “speedier justice” for victims.

“Our experience of using cameras already shows that people are more likely to plead guilty when they know we have captured the incident. That speeds up justice, puts offenders behind bars more quickly and protects potential victims,” Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe said in a statement.

The Taser AXON Body Camera simply attaches to an officer’s shirt or belt and records continuously on a 30-second loop. The cameras are being worn by officers — or “bobbies” as the Brits call them — in 10 boroughs in London.

The palm-sized camera comes equipped with a 130-degree lens, giving officers a wide field of view, and can continuously record for more than 12 hours under normal battery operation.

There are two ways it can be switched on: simply press a button or slide a switch across the top.

When the camera is rolling, it will save 30 seconds of footage from the loop and continue recording, ensuring officers don’t miss any potential images that could be used as evidence.

The cameras will have a sticker indicating they are recording video and audio, and officers will let people know they’re recording, according to a Metropolitan Police video explaining the devices.

Each pixel on the camera captures light with a sensitivity comparable to the human retina, according to the Taser AXON website, making it easier to see footage from nighttime incidents.

The Metropolitan Police said officers will upload the material from their cameras to a cloud-based server at the end of their shifts. Authorities said the footage will be deleted after 31 days unless there is a request to keep it for evidence.

The cameras are already in use in some U.S. cities, including Rialto, California. According to data posted on Taser’s website, the local police department in Rialto reported an 87.5 percent decrease in complaints and a 59 percent decline in the use of force one year after the cameras were implemented.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Cathay Pacific(NEW YORK) — Are Cathay Pacific’s flight attendant uniforms too sexy?

The union representing cabin crew complained that the blouses are too short, according to the South China Morning Post.

When the attendants bend down to get food from the trolley, skin is exposed, they claim.

Flight Attendants Union honorary secretary Michelle Choi told the newspaper: “We believe the company intentionally does this to make us look a bit sexier and to let the passenger see more.”

The airline introduced the uniforms in 2011. At the time, the airline said the uniforms were reflective of the “airline’s progressive nature.” The FAU also thinks the skirts are too tight.

Choi said she believed the too-revealing uniforms were contributing to an apparent rise in incidents of sexual harassment of cabin crew by passengers, which she now estimates to affect each cabin crew member on one in every 10 flights.

In a statement to the newspaper, Cathay Pacific said: “Crew are welcome to exchange their uniform any time if they feel the fit is not right.” The airline also said it “does not tolerate” any form of harassment.

The uniform took two years to develop and a wearer trial was conducted over a six-week period to ensure the new uniform is practical and functional for staff, the airline said at the time the new uniform was introduced.

Cathay Pacific did not respond to an ABC News request for comment.

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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