Associated Press

A tweet earlier this month suggesting insider information on the grand jury investigating the Ferguson police officer who shot Michael Brown was the result of someone hacking a woman’s Twitter account, St. Louis County prosecutor Bob McCulloch said Thursday.

McCulloch released a statement criticizing leaks in the investigation that followed the death of the 18-year-old on Aug. 9 in Ferguson. A grand jury is deciding if Officer Darren Wilson will face charges. A decision is expected by mid-November.

The leak was among several with alleged details of the grand jury investigation, with much of the information suggesting evidence in favor of Wilson. McCulloch said the leaks are “a great disservice to the grand jury process,” but he also questioned their accuracy.

“As exasperating as I and others find the piecemeal release of information and documents, no information or evidence has been released by the grand jury, any individual juror or anyone associated with the grand jury,” McCulloch said in the statement.

He specifically cited the tweet under the name of Susan M. Nichols on Oct. 1. The tweet suggested that an unidentified friend serving on the grand jury said the panel lacked evidence to warrant criminal charges.

Nichols, of Affton, said her Twitter account had been hacked and that she had made no such tweet.

She was telling the truth, McCulloch said — an investigation revealed that Nichols’ account was hacked and the person who actually wrote the tweet was unknown.

Nichols declined comment to The Associated Press when a reporter went to her home the day after the tweet. She does not have a published telephone listing.

Brown’s killing led to several protests, some of them violent, and a national debate about police use of force and race relations. The officer is white. Brown, who was unarmed, was black.

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PHOTO: A small twin engine plane hit a building after losing power in one of its engines soon after taking off from Mid-Continent Airport in Wichita, Kan., Oct. 30, 2014.

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A prop plane crashed into a building this morning at an airport in Wichita, Kansas, officials said.

Two people died in the crash and five people have been rushed to a local hospital to treat “serious” injuries, Wichita Fire Department Chief Ron Blackwell confirmed.

“We don’t know what may have caused the incident,” Blackwell said, noting that responders faced a “horrific firefight for several minutes.”

Emergency crews are on the scene at Mid-Continent Airport, where a federal official has confirmed to ABC News that the incident is not related to terrorism.

The plane was headed to Mena, Arizona, the official said.

KAKE

PHOTO: A small twin engine plane hit a building after losing power in one of its engines soon after taking off from Mid-Continent Airport in Wichita, Kan., Oct. 30, 2014.

There have been no reports of how many people are possibly in danger in the situation, but smoke can be seen billowing from the building from miles away.

PHOTO: Jaison Podkanowicz posted this photo to Twitter on Oct. 30, 2014 from Mid Continent Airport, Wichita, Kansas with the caption, plane crashes into building at Mid Continent Airport.

Jaison Podkanowicz

PHOTO: Jaison Podkanowicz posted this photo to Twitter on Oct. 30, 2014 from Mid Continent Airport, Wichita, Kansas with the caption, “plane crashes into building at Mid Continent Airport”.

The plane involved in the crash was a twin-engine Beechcraft that was taking off but lost power in one engine, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

PHOTO: A passenger at the Mid Continent airport in Wichita, Kansas posted this photo to Instagram on Oct. 30, 2014 with the caption, Not exactly what you want to see before boarding an airplane. #fire

jdbmoc16/Instagram

PHOTO: A passenger at the Mid Continent airport in Wichita, Kansas posted this photo to Instagram on Oct. 30, 2014 with the caption, “Not exactly what you want to see before boarding an airplane. #fire”

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An Ebola nurse fighting quarantine orders in Maine may get at least one perk: a pizza from Moose Shack on Main Street.

Nurse Kaci Hickox, told reporters last night that the one thing she missed while she was cooped up in her Fort Kent home was Moose Shack pizza. Now, the pizzeria is in contact with the police department to see whether they can deliver a pizza to her today.

Hickox, 33, returned from treating Ebola patients in West Africa last week and this morning broke Maine’s voluntary quarantine by going on a bike ride as officials waffled between whether to seek legal enforcement to the quarantine or let her off the hook with a blood test.

April Hafford, whose father owns the pizzeria, told ABC News that their biggest concern is how their customers will feel about it.

“It’s such a small place here, and it could go either way,” she said. “There’s a lot of people that maybe wouldn’t come here because of it — and who would come because of it. It could go either way.”

Hafford, who said she’s seen Hickox and her boyfriend in the pizza shop three times since it opened in January, said Moose Shack has already received a lot of calls about Hickox this morning, and that the quarantine is a controversial issue in the small town.

So does Hickox have pepperoni or veggies coming her way on that pizza?

“I don’t know,” Hafford said. “We haven’t decided what kind yet.”

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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An Ebola nurse fighting quarantine orders in Maine may get at least one perk: a pizza from Moose Shack on Main Street.

Nurse Kaci Hickox, told reporters last night that the one thing she missed while she was cooped up in her Fort Kent home was Moose Shack pizza. Now, the pizzeria is in contact with the police department to see whether they can deliver a pizza to her today.

Hickox, 33, returned from treating Ebola patients in West Africa last week and this morning broke Maine’s voluntary quarantine by going on a bike ride as officials waffled between whether to seek legal enforcement to the quarantine or let her off the hook with a blood test.

April Hafford, whose father owns the pizzeria, told ABC News that their biggest concern is how their customers will feel about it.

“It’s such a small place here, and it could go either way,” she said. “There’s a lot of people that maybe wouldn’t come here because of it — and who would come because of it. It could go either way.”

Hafford, who said she’s seen Hickox and her boyfriend in the pizza shop three times since it opened in January, said Moose Shack has already received a lot of calls about Hickox this morning, and that the quarantine is a controversial issue in the small town.

So does Hickox have pepperoni or veggies coming her way on that pizza?

“I don’t know,” Hafford said. “We haven’t decided what kind yet.”

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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PHOTO: A small twin engine plane hit a building after losing power in one of its engines soon after taking off from Mid-Continent Airport in Wichita, Kan., Oct. 30, 2014.

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A prop plane reportedly hit a building this morning at an airport in Wichita, Kansas, officials said.

Emergency crews are on the scene at Mid-Continent Airport, where a federal official has confirmed to ABC News that the incident is not related to terrorism.

The plane was headed to Mena, Arizona, the official said.

KAKE

PHOTO: A small twin engine plane hit a building after losing power in one of its engines soon after taking off from Mid-Continent Airport in Wichita, Kan., Oct. 30, 2014.

There have been no reports of how many people are possibly in danger in the situation, but smoke can be seen billowing from the building from miles away.

The plane involved in the crash was a twin-engine Beechcraft that was taking off but lost power in one engine, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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Associated Press

Thomas Menino, whose folksy manner and verbal gaffes belied his shrewd political tactics to govern as Boston’s longest-serving mayor and one of its most beloved, died Thursday. He was 71.

Spokeswoman Dot Joyce said in a statement that Menino died in the company of his family and friends. He was diagnosed with advanced cancer in February 2014, shortly after leaving office, and announced Oct. 23 he was suspending treatment and a book tour so he could spend more time with family and friends.

Menino was first elected in 1993 and built a formidable political machine that ended decades of Irish domination of city politics, at least temporarily. He won re-election four times. He was the city’s first Italian-American mayor and served in the office for more than 20 years before a series of health problems forced him, reluctantly, to eschew a bid for a sixth term.

“I can run, I can win and I can lead, but not in the neighborhoods all the time as I like,” Menino, a Democrat, told an overflow crowd at Boston’s historic Faneuil Hall on March 28, 2013.

Less than three weeks after that announcement, two bombs exploded at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three people and injuring more than 260. Menino, who had undergone surgery on a broken leg just two days earlier, checked himself out of a hospital to help lead his shaken city through the crisis.

At an interfaith service three days after the bombings, Menino, in a symbolic act of personal defiance, painfully pulled himself to his feet from his wheelchair to declare that no act of violence could break Boston’s spirit.

He was in an SUV in nearby Watertown at the end of a daylong manhunt when Police Commissioner Edward Davis informed him that the surviving bombing suspect had been captured. Menino’s tweet: “We got him.”

Menino was anything but a smooth public speaker and was prone to verbal gaffes. He was widely quoted describing Boston’s notorious parking shortage as “an Alcatraz” around his neck, rather than an albatross.

He often mangled or mixed up the names of Boston sports heroes — once famously confusing former New England Patriots kicker and Super Bowl hero Adam Vinatieri with ex-Red Sox catcher Jason Varitek. But while such mistakes might sink other politicians in a sports-crazed city, they only seemed to reinforce his affable personality and ability to connect with the residents he served.

“I’m Tom Menino. I’m not a fancy talker, but I get things done,” he said in his first TV ad.

In an interview with The Associated Press in March, Menino said he “loved every minute” of being mayor, even during the city’s darkest days. He credited his staff and others, downplaying his own role.

“I just did my job — nothing special,” he said.

Thomas Michael Menino was born on Dec. 27, 1942, in the city’s Hyde Park neighborhood. A former insurance salesman, he caught the political bug while working as a legislative aide to state Sen. Joseph Timilty. He first earned elective office as a district city councilor in 1984.

Menino became the council’s president in 1993 and was automatically elevated to mayor when then-mayor Raymond Flynn was named U.S. ambassador to the Vatican. While that prompted some to initially chide Menino as an “accidental mayor,” he quickly proved his own political mettle, winning a four-year term later that year.

He never sought nor showed interest in running for higher office. Mayor, it seemed, was the only political job to which he aspired.

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Maine’s governor indicated today that he would abandon his demand that nurse Kaci Hickox remain under quarantine after treating Ebola patients if she would agree to take a blood test for the lethal virus.

Gov. Paul LePage made his comment to ABC News today as Hickox defiantly challenged demands that she remain quarantined by leaving her home this morning for a bike ride with her boyfriend.

LePage indicated to ABC News that he was willing to abandon his demands that the nurse remain quarantined if she would take a blood test for Ebola.

While Hickox was pedaling, attorneys for the state of Maine went to Superior Court seeking a judge’s permission to give Hickox a blood test for Ebola, LePage said.

“This could be resolved today,” the governor said. “She has been exposed and she’s not cooperative, so force her to take a test. It’s so simple.”

Medical experts have said that an Ebola test would only be positive if someone were symptomatic, and could register a negative result if the amount of Ebola virus in the blood hadn’t reached a detectable level.

The governor said he has a state police car stationed outside Hickox’s home and that she has the town “scared to death.”

Hickox, 33, went on the bike ride in Fort Kent, Maine, after vowing last night she wasn’t willing to “stand here and have my civil rights violated.”

While Hickox was pedaling, attorneys for the state of Maine went to Superior Court seeking a judge’s permission to give Hickox a blood test for Ebola, Maine Gov. Paul LePage told ABC News.

“This could be resolved today,” LePage said. “She has been exposed and she’s not cooperative, so force her to take a test. It’s so simple.”

Medical experts have said that an Ebola test would only be positive if someone were symptomatic.

The governor said he has a state police car stationed outside Hickox’s home and that she has the town “scared to death.”

The nurse, who had been treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone for Doctors Without Borders, said she was fighting for her rights as well as other health care workers who will be returning from the Ebola hot zone in West Africa. She said that Doctors Without Border told her another 20 health care workers will be coming home in the next month.

“Most aid workers who come home just want to see their family and have a sort of normal life,” she told reporters Wednesday night. “I’m fighting for something other than myself. There are aid workers coming back every day.”

Hickox said she isn’t committed to a quarantine that isn’t “scientifically valid,” she told reporters standing alongside her boyfriend, Ted Wilbur, outside her home Wednesday night. The quarantine demand goes beyond guidelines put out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which indicate that she can’t spread Ebola if she isn’t sick, doesn’t have symptoms and no one is in close contact with her bodily fluids.

“You could hug me, you could shake my hand [and] I would not give you Ebola,” she said.

HIckox returned to the United States on Oct. 24, landing in Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, where she was questioned and quarantined in an outdoor tent through the weekend despite having no symptoms of the lethal virus.

Hickox registered a fever on an infrared thermometer at the airport, but an oral thermometer at University Hospital in Newark showed that she had no fever, she said.

After twice testing negative for the Ebola, Hickox was released and returned home to Maine on Oct. 27. Maine’s health commissioner announced that Maine would join the handful of states going beyond federal guidelines and asking that returning Ebola health workers be self-quarantined for 21 days.

But Hickox vowed to break the quarantine because it wasn’t based on science.

“I will go to court to attain my freedom,” Hickox told “Good Morning America” Wednesday via Skype from her hometown of Fort Kent. “I have been completely asymptomatic since I’ve been here. I feel absolutely great.”

The CDC doesn’t consider health workers who treated Ebola patients in West Africa to be at “high risk” for catching Ebola if they were wearing protective gear, according to new guidelines announced this week. Since they have “some risk,” the CDC recommends that they undergo monitoring — tracking symptoms and body temperature twice a day — avoid public transportation and take other precautions. But the CDC doesn’t require home quarantines for these workers.

Someone isn’t contagious until Ebola symptoms appear, according to the CDC. And even then, transmission requires contact with bodily fluids such as blood and vomit.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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Elections are getting more expensive by the year.

The 2014 congressional elections, though seemingly less intense and animated than their recent, wave-election predecessors in 2006 and 2010, are on pace to cost more than any midterm elections ever.

The 2014 House and Senate races will cost at least $3.67 billion, more than the $2.9 billion spent on House and Senate races in 2006 and slightly edging the $3.6 billion spent in 2010, but ranking just below the $3.7 billion spent on congressional races in the presidential-election year of 2012, the Center for Responsive Politics estimates.

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The real number will likely be higher. Because of gaps in disclosure requirements, nonprofit groups like the conservative, Koch-backed Americans for Prosperity were able to spend money on “issue ads,” which didn’t directly tell voters to support or oppose a candidate, for most of the year without reporting them to federal campaign-finance regulators.

The Center for Responsive Politics estimates that “well over” $100 million in 2014 will have gone undisclosed, not counting toward that $3.67 billion total.

So where’s all this money going? Here are the most expensive House and Senate races, as compiled by the center. As campaigns and outside groups hurriedly file disclosure reports between now and Election Day, these numbers will change, so check this page for a running list.

MOST EXPENSIVE SENATE RACES

1. North Carolina – Tillis (R) vs. Hagan (D) – $113M

2. Colorado – Gardner (R) vs. Udall (D) – $94M

3. Iowa – Ernst (R) vs. Braley (D) – $82M

4. Kentucky – McConnell (R) vs. Grimes (D) – $78M

5. Georgia – Perdue (R) vs. Nunn (D) – $65M

6. Arkansas – Cotton (R) vs. Pryor (D) – $58M

7. Alaska – Sullivan (R) vs. Begich (D) – $58M

8. New Hampshire – Brown (R) vs. Shaheen (D) – $47M

9. Michigan – Land (R) vs. Peters (D) – $47M

10. Louisiana – Cassidy (R) vs. Landrieu (D) – $42M

Source: OpenSecrets.org/Center for Responsive Politics

MOST EXPENSIVE HOUSE RACES

1. CA07 – Ose (R) vs. Bera (D) – $21M

2. OH08 – Boehner (R) vs. Poetter (D) – $17M

3. CO06 – Coffman (R) vs. Romanoff (D) – $17M

4. AZ01 – Tobin (R) vs. Kirkpatrick – $17M

5. AZ02 – McSally (R) vs. Barber (D) – $16M

6. L10 – Dold (R) vs. Schneider (D) – $16M

7. MN08 – Mills (R) vs. Nolan (D) – $15M

8. NY01 – Zeldin (R) vs. Bishop (D) – $15M

9. FL13 (March special election) – Jolly (R) vs. Sink (D) – $14M

10. FL02 – MacArthur (R) vs. Belgard (D) – $14M

Source: OpenSecrets.org/Center for Responsive Politics

Get real-time results pushed to your phone on Election Night. Click here to sign up for the races that matter most to you.

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A nurse who returned from fighting Ebola in West Africa challenged the demands that she remain quarantined by leaving her home this morning for bike ride with her boyfriend.

Kaci Hickox, 33, went on the bike ride with her boyfriend in Fort Kent, Maine, after vowing last night she wasn’t willing to “stand here and have my civil rights violated.” State officials said they were preparing to file a court order to enforce a mandatory quarantine, but it would first have to be approved by a judge.

Hickox was treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone for Doctors Without Borders. She returned to the United States on Friday, landing in Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, where she was questioned and quarantined in an outdoor tent through the weekend despite having no symptoms of the lethal virus.

Hickox registered a fever on an infrared thermometer at the airport, but an oral thermometer at University Hospital in Newark showed that she had no fever, she said.

After twice testing negative for the Ebola, Hickox was released and returned home to Maine on Monday. Maine’s health commissioner announced that Maine would join the handful of states going beyond federal guidelines and asking that returning Ebola health workers be self-quarantined for 21 days.

“Our true desire is for a voluntary separation from the public. We do not want to have to legally enforce an in-home quarantine,” Maine Health Commissioner Mary Mayhew said in a statement. “We are confident that the selfless health workers, who were brave enough to care for Ebola patients in a foreign country, will be willing to take reasonable steps to protect the residents of their own country. However, we are willing to pursue legal authority if necessary to ensure risk is minimized for Mainers.”

Hickox said she doesn’t think it is reasonable.

“I will go to court to attain my freedom,” Hickox told “Good Morning America” Wednesday via Skype from her hometown of Fort Kent. “I have been completely asymptomatic since I’ve been here. I feel absolutely great.”

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention doesn’t consider health workers who treated Ebola patients in West Africa to be at “high risk” for catching Ebola if they were wearing protective gear, according to new guidelines announced this week. Since they have “some risk,” the CDC recommends that they undergo monitoring — tracking symptoms and body temperature twice a day — avoid public transportation and take other precautions. But the CDC doesn’t require home quarantines for these workers.

Someone isn’t contagious until Ebola symptoms appear, according to the CDC. And even then, transmission requires contact with bodily fluids such as blood and vomit.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here. To be notified about our live weekend digital reports, tap here.

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PHOTO: Wider seating while you enjoy panoramic views.

Imagine flying on an airplane and being able the clouds all around you. That’s what one company plans on achieving in the next 10 years — an airplane without windows.

The Centre for Process Innovation (CPI), a U.K.-based cutting edge technology association, envisioned the next generation aircraft in efforts to conserve fuel, while drastically transforming the customer experience.

Centre for Process Innovation

PHOTO: Wider seating while you enjoy panoramic views.

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“Removing the windows will significantly reduce the weight of the aircraft, saving fuel and therefore reducing operational costs,” says Matthew Herbert, marketing manager for CPI. “The windows will be replaced by high quality flexible OLED displays that are connected to digital cameras integrated into the exterior of the plane,” he says.

Lower operational costs, the company claims, will in turn result in reduced airfares.

PHOTO: Live video, information, and in-flight services at your fingertips.

Centre for Process Innovation

PHOTO: Live video, information, and in-flight services at your fingertips.

In addition to the windowless element, passengers can surf the web, enjoy in-flight entertainment, or change the views from different angles of the plane.

PHOTO: Windows to be replaced by full-length screens.

Centre for Process Innovation

PHOTO: Windows to be replaced by full-length screens.

A few months ago, Spike Aerospace, Inc. introduced the concept behind the “world’s first supersonic jet.” called the Spike S-512, which also has a windowless feature.

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