Julie Jacobson-Pool/Getty Images(LAS VEGAS) — All eyes will be on one of America’s most famous inmates, O.J. Simpson, on Thursday, as he appears in front of a parole board from behind bars at a Nevada prison.

If granted parole, Simpson, who was acquitted of all criminal charges in the 1994 killing of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ron Goldman, could be released from prison as early as October.

Here is everything you need to know about the parole hearing:

The conviction

Simpson, 70, is in prison following an arrest in 2007 during a botched robbery in Las Vegas, when he led a group of men into a hotel and casino to steal his own sports memorabilia at gunpoint. He was charged with a number of felony counts, including kidnapping and armed robbery. He was found guilty and sentenced to up to 33 years in prison.

The former football star contended the memorabilia and other personal items belonged to him. His bid for a new trial in the case was rejected in 2013, but he was granted parole that same year on some of the charges, based on good behavior. He was not released from prison at that time, since his prison sentences were set to run consecutively. Simpson had to wait until this year to appear again before the parole board.

The hearing

On July 20, Simpson will appear in front of the Nevada Parole Board in Carson City, Nevada, remotely via video conference from Lovelock Correctional Center in Lovelock. The hearing is set for 1 p.m. ET.

The decision

Simpson’s fate will be determined the same day as the hearing.

The commissioners will consider items including: his conduct in prison, participation in prison programs, potential letter of support and an assessment of the risk of re-offending.

He needs four votes from commissioners to get paroled.

Four commissioners will deliberate in Carson City; if they are unanimous, that will become the final decision.

If the panel splits in any way, they will stop the voting and call in via phone two additional commissioners who will be on standby in Las Vegas so the voting can resume.

If the deliberation moves to six commissioners, four of them must grant parole for Simpson to be released.

If the parole board is split evenly, the board has established a policy to deny parole for six months, and a subsequent hearing will be held in January 2018.

If granted parole

If Simpson is granted parole, his earliest possible release date is Oct. 1.

He could potentially leave the state; however, parole restrictions may require him to serve a year of community service in Clark County, Nevada.

Simpson’s friend, Tom Scotto, told ABC News that Simpson is “hopeful” he’ll be paroled. Scotto said if Simpson is freed, he would want “to just keep a low profile, be with his kids, be with his family, play golf.”

A July 14 statement on behalf of Ron Goldman’s father, Fred Goldman, and sister, Kim Goldman, said, “Fred and Kim Goldman anxiously await” Simpson’s parole hearing.

“While they respect the legal process, they are feeling both frustration and anticipation over how this will change their lives again should Simpson be released. As with all victims and survivors, they will remain patient and optimistic that the system will do what is necessary to ensure the public’s safety remains a priority and that proper justice will be served,” the statement continued.

Goldman’s family told ABC News earlier this year they cannot bear the idea of Simpson as a free man.

“Disgust,” Ron Goldman said when asked what it would look like to him if Simpson was paroled.

Added Kim Goldman, “He committed a horrible heinous crime, and I have no feeling except rot in hell.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) — Minnesota state officials released on Tuesday night the identities of two Minneapolis Police Department officers involved in the fatal shooting of a 40-year-old Australian woman who called 911 on Saturday.

Police have launched an internal affairs review of the officers’ use of force.

Matthew Harrity, who has been with the Minneapolis Police Department for one year, and Mohamed Noor, who has been with the department for 21 months, were the responding officers to the scene after Justine Maia Ruszczyk called 911 to report a possible assault near her home, the Minnesota Department of Public Safety announced in a press release Tuesday night.

Harrity was driving the squad car, while Noor was in the passenger seat, according to the DPS. As they neared Ruszczyk’s home, Harrity indicated that he was startled by a loud sound near the car, after which Ruszczyk immediately approached the driver’s side, Minnesota DPS said.

Noor then fired his weapon, striking Ruszczyk through the driver’s side window, which was open, according to the DPS. The officers provided medical assistance to Ruszczyk until EMS arrived, but she was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police said at a press conference Tuesday night that the 911 call’s transcript will be released after Ruszczyk’s family has reviewed it.

The Hennepin County Medical Examiner’s Officer confirmed Monday that Ruszczyk died of a single gunshot wound to her abdomen.

Investigators are seeking to interview a white male about 18 to 25 years old who was seen riding a bicycle in the area immediately before the shooting, according to the DPS.

The officers’ body cameras were not turned on during the shooting, authorities said. The reason why police did not have their body cameras turned on is a “key question” for investigators, Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges said on ABC News’ Good Morning America Tuesday.

Minneapolis Police Department Assistant Chief Mederia Arradondo said at Tuesday night’s press conference that the department is eight months out from fully rolling out body cameras across the force. He added that the police department will soon review the body camera program.

In a statement Tuesday, Hodges described Ruszczyk’s death as “tragic,” adding that she will continue to keep the lines of communication among officials and the public open due to interest in the case.

Harrity was interviewed by investigators Tuesday, but Noor declined to be interviewed, the DPS said. The Minnesota DPS Bureau of Criminal Apprehension cannot compel Noor to testify, and Noor’s attorney did not provide clarification on when, if ever, an interview will take place.

“We all want answers, we all want justice to be done … I wish he would make that statement,” Hodges said at press conference Tuesday night. She also said she has spoken to Ruszczyk’s fiance, Don Damond, and their neighbors.

Council member Linea Palmisano expressed her dissatisfaction with the information released so far, describing it as “underwhelming.”

Both officers have been placed on standard paid administrative leave. Ruszczyk’s death is being ruled a homicide.

Minnesota Police Chief Janee Harteau was out of the state for personal travel in the aftermath of the shooting but is cutting the trip short due to the incident, a spokesperson for the department told ABC News. She has been in constant contact with her team over the last three days, the spokesperson said.

Damond told reporters Monday that Ruszczyk’s death is a “loss to everyone who knew her.”

“She touched so many people with her loving and generous heart. She was a teacher to so many and living a life of openness, love, and kindness,” he said. “Our lives are forever changed as a result of knowing her. She was so kind and so darn funny … It is difficult to fathom how to go forward without her in my life.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(MARIPOSA, Calif.) — An entire California town was evacuated on Tuesday evening due to a 25,000-acre wildfire that had already destroyed eight structures, officials said.

California fire officials issued an evacuation order for the town of Mariposa, which has a population of about 2,000, on Tuesday as the wildfire threatened to burn some 1,500 homes and structures, according to fire officials.

The wildfire, dubbed the Detwiler Fire by authorities, ignited on Sunday. It was 5 percent contained as of late Tuesday evening, according to fire officials.

Officials said the fire also threatens to damage power lines that feed to the Yosemite National Park, located in the state’s Sierra Nevada mountains.

California Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency in Mariposa County on Tuesday due to the fire, which he said had damaged power, water and communication infrastructure and forced the closure of major highways and local roads in the area.

“I don’t think we can emphasize enough how erratic and active this fire activity is — especially with this fire,” Mariposa County Sheriff Doug Binnewies told ABC affiliate KFSN-TV on Tuesday. “It’s done stuff that we’ve never seen before.”

More than 1,400 fire personnel from multiple agencies were dispatched to fight the “extreme and aggressive fire” via air and ground but the battle was complicated by severe temperatures and humidity, fire officials said.

“When you add the challenge that we’re in the foothills — when you add the slopes and grades and the temperatures we’re dealing with, the humidity we’re dealing with — it’s a full on the challenge,” Cal Fire public information officer Isaac Sanchez told KFSN.

Officials said the fire threatened several communities surrounding Mariposa, located about 160 miles east of San Francisco, as well as some “culturally and historically sensitive areas.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) — Minnesota state officials released on Tuesday night the identities of two Minneapolis Police Department officers involved in the fatal shooting of a 40-year-old Australian woman who called 911 on Saturday.

Matthew Harrity, who has been with the Minneapolis Police Department for one year, and Mohamed Noor, who has been with the department for 21 months, were the responding officers to the scene after Justine Maia Ruszczyk called 911 to report a possible assault near her home, the Minnesota Department of Public Safety announced in a press release Tuesday night.

Harrity was driving the squad car, while Noor was in the passenger seat, according to the DPS. As they neared Ruszczyk’s home, Harrity indicated that he was startled by a loud sound near the car, after which Ruszczyk immediately approached the driver’s side, Minnesota DPS said.

Noor then fired his weapon, striking Ruszczyk through the driver’s side window, which was open, according to the DPS. The officers provided medical assistance to Ruszczyk until EMS arrived, but she was pronounced dead at the scene.

The Hennepin County Medical Examiner’s Officer confirmed Monday that Ruszczyk died of a single gunshot wound to her abdomen after she was shot.

Investigators are seeking to interview a white male about 18 to 25 years old who was seen riding a bicycle in the area immediately before the shooting, according to the DPS.

The officers’ body cameras were not turned on during the shooting, authorities said. The reason why police did not have their body cameras turned on is a “key question” for investigators, Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges said on “Good Morning America” Tuesday.

In a statement Tuesday, Hodges described Ruszczyk’s death as “tragic,” adding that she will continue to keep the lines of communication among officials and the public open due to interest in the case.

Harrity was interviewed by investigators Tuesday, but Noor declined to be interviewed, the DPS said. The Minnesota DPS Bureau of Criminal Apprehension cannot compel Noor to testify, and Noor’s attorney did not provide clarification on when, if ever, an interview will take place.

Both officers have been placed on standard paid administrative leave. Ruszczyk’s death is being ruled a homicide.

Minnesota Police Chief Janee Harteau was out of the state for personal travel in the aftermath of the shooting but is cutting the trip short due to the incident, a spokesperson for the department told ABC News. She has been in constant contact with her team over the last three days, the spokesperson said.

Ruszczyk’s fiance, Don Damond, told reporters Monday that her death is a “loss to everyone who knew her.”

“She touched so many people with her loving and generous heart. She was a teacher to so many and living a life of openness, love, and kindness,” he said. “Our lives are forever changed as a result of knowing her. She was so kind and so darn funny … It is difficult to fathom how to go forward without her in my life.”

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ABCNews.com(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — A North Carolina state trooper has been placed on administrative duty after he was captured on video appearing to race down a highway into oncoming traffic on Sunday night.

Sergeant Michael Baker of the North Carolina Department of Public Safety told ABC News in an email that “Trooper T.J. Williamson was placed on administrative duty pending an internal investigation by the State Highway Patrol” on Monday.

ABC affiliate WSOC-TV reported that the trooper was responding to complaints of illegal street racing when he drove onto the wrong side of Highway 321 in Catawba County. WSOC-TV reported that state troopers had previously received numerous calls about street racers endangering others along the four-lane highway.

Carisa Lynn captured the incident involving Williamson on her cell phone, telling WSOC-TV that “street racing isn’t what you should be doing but it was more reckless, in my opinion, of the police officer to be driving the way he was driving, in general, to pull over some people racing.”

Baker said Williamson has been employed with the patrol since August 2016 and that an internal investigation into the incident is being conducted.

Seven people were arrested in the traffic stop on charges related to street racing and five vehicles were impounded by the state highway patrol, WSOC-TV reported.

ABC News has reached out to the North Carolina division of the Police Benevolent Association but did not immediately receive a response.

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Brandon West(PHOENIX) — An eyewitness who captured video of the powerful flash flood that killed nine people this weekend in Arizona questioned during the ordeal whether he would even survive to talk about it.

“You make the wrong step and you get sucked under. You just pray you make the right decision,” Brandon West of Chandler, Arizona, told ABC Phoenix affiliate KNXV-TV.

West, 36, a friend and his dog named Lucky were headed to the area for a swim in the hot weather, KNXV-TV reported, when they encountered the rolling tide of black water, thick with debris.

West not only survived but managed to record what he saw on video.

But the nine people from a single family, including several children, who were swept to their deaths were less fortunate.

Meanwhile, police are also still searching for a 27-year-old man who went missing as “part of a group of 14 individuals caught in a flash flood in the East Verde River just North of Payson Saturday,” according to the Gila County Sheriff’s office.

They also released the names of the dead, whose ages range from 2 to 57.

Jonathan Leon, 13, Mia Garnica, 5, Emily Garnica, 3, Danial Garnica, 7, Javier Raya-Garcia, 19, Selia Garcia Castaneda, 57, Erica Raya-Garcia, 2, Maribel Raya-Garcia, 24, and Maria Raya-Garcia, 27, were all found dead after the flood, according to the sheriff’s office.

Julio Garcia, 29, Esthela Atondo, 28, Acis Garcia, 8, Marina Garcia, 1, were rescued and survived the incident, the Sheriff’s office noted.

ABC News meteorologist Max Golembo said that what Arizona experiences during its monsoon season differs significantly from heavy rainfall in other areas, like Florida, partly because of the terrain.

Arizona’s long periods of sustained, dry heat played a role in giving the rushing fluid its thickness and blackish color, he said.

The dry heat in Arizona weakens trees and brush, making it easier for them to break apart under pressure, Golembo said. As a result, debris accumulates in the flowing water.

“When water sweeps along it can pick up the branches and take them along,” he said. “That’s why in video of the flooding, the water has that very dark color.”

That made the water significantly more dangerous than it would have been without the debris, Golembo noted.

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ABCNews.com(DALLAS) — A bolt of lightning has left Anthony Rubalcava familiar with three words that rhyme: struck, truck and luck.

The Texas man was sitting in his Ford F-250 Lariat on Saturday when lightning hit the vehicle’s antenna and caused a small fire, scorching the passenger side.

“I guess in a way I feel blessed that it didn’t hit my side because I might not be standing here right now,” Rubalcava told ABC Dallas affiliate WFAA-TV.

Fire officials share Rubalcava’s opinion and say he’s lucky that he wasn’t touching anything metal during the electrostatic discharge.

Amy Cortez of the Nevada Fire Department told WFAA, “The current could have gone through him and it could have been a totally different call that we got.”

Thankful he escaped without injury, Rubalcava now intends to start looking for a new set of wheels. Perhaps a Chevy Bolt?

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Lisa DeJong/The Plain Dealer via Barcroft(WILLARD, Ohio) — An Ohio father of four bid an emotional farewell to his family Tuesday morning before returning to Mexico.

Jesus Lara Lopez, who formerly worked at Pepperidge Farm in Willard, Ohio, was seen off by family and about a dozen supporters at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport Tuesday morning, according to the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

Photographs taken at the airport before his flight show Lopez embracing his children in a series of tearful goodbyes.

When Lopez checked in with immigration officials back in March, he was told he was being deported under “an illegal immigration crackdown,” his lawyer David Leopold told the press Tuesday.

Lopez has been in the country for 16 years, and his children were born in the U.S., the Plain Dealer reported.

Lopez was first ordered to be removed in 2011 by a federal immigration judge, Khaalid Walls, the Northeast regional communications director for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), told ABC News.

In 2014, the agency granted a stay of removal in his case, Walls said, and “in a further exercise of discretion, the agency has allowed him to remain free from custody to finalize his departure plans.”

“The agency will continue to closely monitor his case to ensure compliance,” he said.

Walls said ICE could not confirm to ABC News whether or not Lopez had complied with their request until after he is “successfully repatriated” for operational and security reasons, but would try to provide an update on his status later today.

ABC affiliate WEWS-TV in Cleveland reported that Lopez had never been charged with a crime during his 16 years in the U.S., has paid taxes and did not receive food stamps.

Walls noted in response that the lack of a criminal record does not necessarily exempt an illegal immigrant from facing deportation.

“As Secretary [John] Kelly and Acting Director [Thomas D.] Homan have stated repeatedly, ICE prioritizes the arrest and removal of national security and public safety threats; however, no class or category of alien in the United States is exempt from arrest or removal,” he told ABC News.

Leopold told WEWS-TV that his client had a valid work permit. The New York Times reported in June that Lopez “[worked] the graveyard shift packing Milano cookies and Goldfish crackers” while at Pepperidge Farm.

ABC News reached out to Pepperidge Farm for a comment about Lopez’s work permit and the company said he was hired by a third-party company, Spherion, which manages packaging workers at the facility. Spherion confirmed to ABC News that Lopez did have a valid work permit and they hired him in October of 2016.

“These are the darkest times I’ve ever seen as an attorney. When the best and the brightest that we have to offer are taken from their homes and sent away,” Leopold told reporters. “The law is so broken.”

America’s Voice, an immigration rights advocacy group, posted a statement on its website criticizing the deportation of Lopez from John Sandweg, former Acting Director of ICE and former Acting General Counsel of the Department of Homeland Security.

“Cases like this are an incredible waste of ICE resources that only make it harder for the agency to identify and remove dangerous criminals,” Sandweg wrote. He added that he believes enforcement resources should be focused on finding criminals and public safety threats instead.

Sandweg has been a vocal critic of President Trump’s broad promise of reducing illegal immigration to the U.S. a central part of his 2016 campaign.

The U.S. had already been focused on enforcing immigration rules under former President Barack Obama, who oversaw the removal of more than 2.5 million people through immigration orders, earning him the nickname “Deporter in Chief.”

“The [Trump] Administration’s focus on the low-hanging fruit of the enforcement system only allows the bad guys to remain at large, weakening our public safety,” Sandweg added.

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ABCNews.com(NEW YORK) — Storm the golden retriever is being hailed a hero for his quick thinking to help save a drowning baby deer.

The dog’s owner, Mark Freeley, said Storm spotted something in New York’s Long Island Sound Sunday morning and jumped in to rescue it, grabbing the drowning baby deer by the neck to bring it to shore.

“Storm, bring him in. Good boy, Storm. Bring him in,” Freeley can be heard shouting in the Facebook video of the harrowing moment caught on camera, which now has more than 3 million views.

Storm won’t even retrieve a tennis ball but, in this moment, he knew exactly what he had to do, Freeley told ABC News.

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iStock/Thinkstock(MINNEAPOLIS) — The reason why police did not have their body cameras turned on when they shot and killed an Australian woman over the weekend is a “key question” for investigators, Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges told “Good Morning America” Tuesday.

“You know, I fought hard to make sure that we have body cameras. They’re a very powerful tool, they’re not an infallible tool, but they’re an important tool in 21st century policing and I don’t know why they weren’t turned on,” Hodges told “GMA.” “I don’t know what happened. That’s one of the key questions that we have as the investigations move forward.”

Just before 11:30 p.m. on Saturday, two Minneapolis police officers “responded to a 911 call of a possible assault,” and “at one point an officer fired their weapon, fatally striking a woman,” according to the state Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA), the lead investigating agency.

The victim was Justine Maia Ruszczyk, 40, the county medical examiner’s office confirmed Monday night. She died from a gunshot wound to the abdomen, the medical examiner said.

The officers’ body cameras were not turned on at the time of the shooting and the squad camera didn’t capture what happened, the BCA said, adding that “investigators are attempting to determine whether any video of the incident exists.”

“When the investigation is complete, the BCA will turn its findings over to the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office for review,” the bureau said.

The two officers involved are on paid administrative leave, the Minneapolis Police Department said.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune said the victim was Australian bride-to-be and went by the name Justine Damond, using the last name of her fiancé, Don Damond.

Ruszczyk’s death is being ruled a homicide.

The shooting was “tragic and awful and disturbing,” according to Hodges.

“I have the same questions everybody has,” she added. “What happened?”

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