iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — In Washington, pork is often in the eye of the beholder. And retiring GOP Sen. Tom Coburn of Oklahoma sees a lot of it.

Coburn’s fifth annual and final “Wastebook” lists 100 “silly, unnecessary and low priority projects” that he says cost taxpayers a combined $25 billion.

“Is each of these a true national priority, or could the money have been better spent on a more urgent need, or not spent at all?” Coburn writes in the 110-page report.

Here are five eyebrow-raising entries on Coburn’s list:

1. Swedish Massages for Rabbits: $387,000

Eighteen New Zealand white rabbits received 30-minute massages, four times a day in a taxpayer-funded study by the National Institutes of Health. The rub downs were performed by a specially-designed mechanical Swedish massage machine that “simulates the long flowing strokes.” Researchers say humans are the ultimate beneficiaries of the project, which studied the benefits of massage on recovery from exercise. But Coburn calls it a case of waste, citing existing studies of treatments for aches and pains, and suggesting that humans would be better subjects than rabbits. (As for those massaged rabbits, they were ultimately euthanized, the report says.)

2. Army Video Game Training Terrorists?: $414,000

The U.S. Army spent $414,000 this year maintaining a free online video game that it first developed and launched as a recruitment tool back in 2009, the report says citing the Congressional Research Service. America’s Army is a first-person shooter game that simulates special forces operations. Coburn, who is a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, says the realistic nature of the program makes it as much a training device as a recruitment tool. “Some intelligence officials worry it could also be aiding jihadists and mass murderers,” the report claims.

3. Hungry Spouses & Voodoo Dolls: $331,000

What happens between couples when one is particularly hungry? A National Science Foundation study set out to evaluate a connection between low blood sugar and anger by arming couples with voodoo dolls representing their spouse. The hungrier the spouse, the more pins were poked into the doll when they got agitated. A lead researcher concluded, “Hungry people are cranky and aggressive.” Coburn’s report claims the findings are “already obvious to many couples.”

4. Mountain Lions on Treadmill: $856,000

Three mountain lions spent eight months learning to walk on a treadmill as part of study funded by taxpayers through National Science Foundation. Researchers were studying the big cats’ energy consumption and hunting techniques to “inform public knowledge and opinion of large mammal behavior and conservation.” It follows similar government treadmill studies on monkeys, rats, cows and even shrimp. “While support for basic science is not itself wasteful,” Coburn’s report reads, “federal research agencies should better prioritize how tax dollars are directed to ensure adequate support for more pressing scientific endeavors.”

5. Unneeded “Sheep Station”: $1.98 million

A 28,000-acre facility in Idaho to graze 3,000 sheep — dubbed the “U.S. Sheep Experiment Station” — has been deemed unsustainable and unnecessary by the Obama administration. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said outright earlier this year that it should be closed to prioritize research on more important projects. But members of congress and other state officials have succeeded in keeping the $2 million a year facility open for the benefit of Idaho businesses, the report says.

Asked about several National Science Foundation projects included in the report, NSF spokeswoman Dana Topousis told ABC News that each was funded after a “rigorous merit review process” through which only 20 percent of proposals each year are approved.

“All proposals submitted to NSF are reviewed according to two merit review criteria: Intellectual Merit and Broader Impacts,” Topousis said in a statement. “Nearly every proposal is evaluated by a minimum of three independent reviewers consisting of scientists, engineers and educators who do not work at NSF or for the institution that employs the proposing researchers.”

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Lloyd Bishop/NBC(LOS ANGELES) — Shailene Woodley can certainly afford to buy a home, but the Golden Globe-nominated actress is homeless by choice.

On Wednesday’s The Ellen DeGeneres Show, Woodley said she prefers a nomadic existence at this point in her life.

“I feel like I’m so young and this is the time to travel and experience new things,” Woodley said, adding that she prefers to travel with a single suitcase.

“It feels so nice to not have to worry about ‘Oh, where is that pair of jeans’ because you only have one pair of jeans, which is why I have a carry-on. Because if everything I own is in a suitcase and that suitcase somehow gets lost then I would just be stranded,” she said with a laugh.

Although she doesn’t have a home, Woodley said she does have a home city.

“I guess L.A. would be my hub because my family is here but I just travel around with my little suitcase that I stole from my mom’s house,” she explained.

Woodley will next be seen on the big screen in White Bird in a Blizzard, out Oct. 24.

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Steve Hamblin/Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The stakes are higher for picking your health care insurance this year, whether choosing employer-sponsored plans or health exchange coverage.

An individual must have some kind of coverage or pay the individual mandate penalty. For 2015, this will be $325 per adult in a family and half that much for each child under 18, up to $975 per household.

“Everyone should get some kind of coverage,” said Timothy Jost, a professor at Washington and Lee University School of Law.

Here are things you should know about open enrollment:

1. Deadlines

Know your employer’s open enrollment period.

Open enrollment for all health care exchanges is shorter for 2015: Nov. 15 to Feb. 15. Individuals may qualify for special enrollment periods beyond this time frame if, for example, they get married, have a baby or move.

2. Employer-sponsored vs. exchange coverage?

Some employees can decline employer-sponsored insurance and instead pursue tax credits on public exchanges. Employer-sponsored insurance must be affordable and offer adequate coverage, said Andrea Riggs, director of communications for GetInsured. If the employee’s contribution toward a plan is less than 9.5 percent of the employee’s household income, then it is deemed affordable.

An employee with low enough wages may also be eligible for Medicaid, Jost said.

3. Research a plan’s total cost

Don’t just focus on the premiums, Riggs said. A few employers, for example, do not cover hospitalization, Jost said. What’s the out-of-pocket limit? Does your employer offer a Health Savings Account (HSA), which can roll over and is yours to keep?

4. Vocabulary and mechanics

Healthy people who need less care should be more comfortable paying lower premiums (the amount paid for your health plan by you and/or your employer) with less coverage, Riggs said. This means higher co-pays (fixed amount paid for a service) and higher deductibles (the amount paid out of pocket before an insurer will pay up). People who need more care should opt for richer benefits (lower co-pays, lower deductibles) with higher premiums.

5. Don’t forget about providers and drugs

Make sure any doctors and specialists key to you are in a plan’s network, that there are enough providers near your home or work and that your prescribed drugs are covered.

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iStock/Thinkstock(OTTOWA, Ontario) — A Canadian soldier was killed Wednesday morning in shootings that forced police to lock down Parliament and hustle the country’s prime minister to a safe location.

Police are searching for two suspects after one was “dealt with,” according to a spokesman for the Ottawa police. Officials later said that male suspect was killed.

The gunfire prompted security force to take Prime Minister Stephen Harper to a “safe” place not at Parliament Hill, his spokesperson said. Harper’s usual office is in a building near the shooting site.

“The prime minister is safe and not on Parliament Hill and being briefed by security officials,” his spokesman Jason MacDonald said.

[WATCH LIVE COVERAGE FROM ABC NEWS]

Ottawa Police said via Twitter the initial shooting took place at 9:52 a.m. at the National War Memorial of Canada, but that was just the beginning of the violent episode, which has now stretched into investigations in two other locations: Parliament Hill and the nearby Rideau Centre, a large shopping mall that was subsequently evacuated.

Ottawa Police Constable Marc Soucy told Canada’s CTV police were searching for more than one suspect and no one has been arrested.

Civic Hospital in Ottawa, the country’s capital, has received three patients, two of whom are in stable condition.

Earlier on Wednesday, witnesses told CTV they saw a man with long hair carrying a rifle and heard four shots fired at the soldier, who was guarding Canada’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

A witness told Canada’s CBC the gunman then ran the short distance to Canada’s Parliament, jumped a wall, stopped a car at gunpoint and hijacked it, the witness said. The driver got out safely, then the man drove the car to the Centre Block on Parliament Hill where senior government leaders have their offices.

WATCH: Dramatic Moments Inside Parliament as Gunfire Is Heard

More ABC news videos | ABC Health News

A CBC reporter inside the Canadian Parliament reported chaos there, hearing lots of gunshots. A lawmaker tweeted more than 30 shots were heard inside Parliament’s Center Block.

All military bases in Canada have been put on lock down in response to the events in Ottawa, CTV reported. The U.S. Embassy in Ottawa recently followed suit.

Senior FBI and Department of Homeland Security officials told ABC News they are closely monitoring the situation. The White House said President Obama has been briefed.

Canada raised its national terrorism alert level on Wednesday, following an incident Monday in which a Canadian soldier was killed in a hit-and-run by a man suspected to have been a radicalized jihadist.

“This level means that intelligence has indicated that an individual or group within Canada or abroad has the intent and capability to commit an act of terrorism,” Jean-Christophe de Le Rue, a spokesman for the Public Safety Ministry said, according to AFP.

WATCH: Active Shooter Situation at Three Locations Near Canadian Parliament

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iStock/Thinkstock(OTTOWA, Ontario) — A Canadian soldier was killed Wednesday morning in shootings that forced police to lock down Parliament and hustle the country’s prime minister to a safe location.

Police are searching for two suspects after one was “dealt with,” according to a spokesman for the Ottawa police. Officials later said that male suspect was killed.

The gunfire prompted security force to take Prime Minister Stephen Harper to a “safe” place not at Parliament Hill, his spokesperson said. Harper’s usual office is in a building near the shooting site.

“The prime minister is safe and not on Parliament Hill and being briefed by security officials,” his spokesman Jason MacDonald said.

[WATCH LIVE COVERAGE FROM ABC NEWS]

Ottawa Police said via Twitter the initial shooting took place at 9:52 a.m. at the National War Memorial of Canada, but that was just the beginning of the violent episode, which has now stretched into investigations in two other locations: Parliament Hill and the nearby Rideau Centre, a large shopping mall that was subsequently evacuated.

Ottawa Police Constable Marc Soucy told Canada’s CTV police were searching for more than one suspect and no one has been arrested.

Civic Hospital in Ottawa, the country’s capital, has received three patients, two of whom are in stable condition.

Earlier on Wednesday, witnesses told CTV they saw a man with long hair carrying a rifle and heard four shots fired at the soldier, who was guarding Canada’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

A witness told Canada’s CBC the gunman then ran the short distance to Canada’s Parliament, jumped a wall, stopped a car at gunpoint and hijacked it, the witness said. The driver got out safely, then the man drove the car to the Centre Block on Parliament Hill where senior government leaders have their offices.

WATCH: Dramatic Moments Inside Parliament as Gunfire Is Heard

More ABC news videos | ABC Health News

A CBC reporter inside the Canadian Parliament reported chaos there, hearing lots of gunshots. A lawmaker tweeted more than 30 shots were heard inside Parliament’s Center Block.

All military bases in Canada have been put on lock down in response to the events in Ottawa, CTV reported. The U.S. Embassy in Ottawa recently followed suit.

Senior FBI and Department of Homeland Security officials told ABC News they are closely monitoring the situation. The White House said President Obama has been briefed.

Canada raised its national terrorism alert level on Wednesday, following an incident Monday in which a Canadian soldier was killed in a hit-and-run by a man suspected to have been a radicalized jihadist.

“This level means that intelligence has indicated that an individual or group within Canada or abroad has the intent and capability to commit an act of terrorism,” Jean-Christophe de Le Rue, a spokesman for the Public Safety Ministry said, according to AFP.

WATCH: Active Shooter Situation at Three Locations Near Canadian Parliament

More ABC news videos | ABC Health News

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Read More →

iStock/Thinkstock(OTTOWA, Ontario) — A Canadian soldier was killed Wednesday morning in shootings that forced police to lock down Parliament and hustle the country’s prime minister to a safe location.

Police are searching for two suspects after one was “dealt with,” according to a spokesman for the Ottawa police. Officials later said that male suspect was killed.

The gunfire prompted security force to take Prime Minister Stephen Harper to a “safe” place not at Parliament Hill, his spokesperson said. Harper’s usual office is in a building near the shooting site.

“The prime minister is safe and not on Parliament Hill and being briefed by security officials,” his spokesman Jason MacDonald said.

[WATCH LIVE COVERAGE FROM ABC NEWS]

Ottawa Police said via Twitter the initial shooting took place at 9:52 a.m. at the National War Memorial of Canada, but that was just the beginning of the violent episode, which has now stretched into investigations in two other locations: Parliament Hill and the nearby Rideau Centre, a large shopping mall that was subsequently evacuated.

Ottawa Police Constable Marc Soucy told Canada’s CTV police were searching for more than one suspect and no one has been arrested.

Civic Hospital in Ottawa, the country’s capital, has received three patients, two of whom are in stable condition.

Earlier on Wednesday, witnesses told CTV they saw a man with long hair carrying a rifle and heard four shots fired at the soldier, who was guarding Canada’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

A witness told Canada’s CBC the gunman then ran the short distance to Canada’s Parliament, jumped a wall, stopped a car at gunpoint and hijacked it, the witness said. The driver got out safely, then the man drove the car to the Centre Block on Parliament Hill where senior government leaders have their offices.

WATCH: Dramatic Moments Inside Parliament as Gunfire Is Heard

More ABC news videos | ABC Health News

A CBC reporter inside the Canadian Parliament reported chaos there, hearing lots of gunshots. A lawmaker tweeted more than 30 shots were heard inside Parliament’s Center Block.

All military bases in Canada have been put on lock down in response to the events in Ottawa, CTV reported. The U.S. Embassy in Ottawa recently followed suit.

Senior FBI and Department of Homeland Security officials told ABC News they are closely monitoring the situation. The White House said President Obama has been briefed.

Canada raised its national terrorism alert level on Wednesday, following an incident Monday in which a Canadian soldier was killed in a hit-and-run by a man suspected to have been a radicalized jihadist.

“This level means that intelligence has indicated that an individual or group within Canada or abroad has the intent and capability to commit an act of terrorism,” Jean-Christophe de Le Rue, a spokesman for the Public Safety Ministry said, according to AFP.

WATCH: Active Shooter Situation at Three Locations Near Canadian Parliament

More ABC news videos | ABC Health News

Follow @ABCNewsRadio

Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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iStock/Thinkstock(OTTOWA, Ontario) — Heavily-armed police cleared Canada’s Parliament building Wednesday and are searching for three suspects after a trio of shooting incidents near the Parliament left a soldier wounded. Gunfire was heard inside Parliament.

One of the three suspects was “dealt with,” according to a spokesman for the Ottawa Police.

The gunfire prompted security force to hustle Prime Minister Stephen Harper to a “safe” place not at Parliament Hill, his spokesperson said. Harper’s usual office is in a building near the shooting site.

“The prime minister is safe and not on Parliament Hill and being briefed by security officials,” his spokesman Jason MacDonald said.

[WATCH LIVE COVERAGE FROM ABC NEWS]

Ottawa Police said via Twitter the initial shooting took place at 9:52 a.m. at the National War Memorial of Canada, but that was just the beginning of the violent episode, which has now stretched into investigations in two other locations: Parliament Hill and the nearby Rideau Centre, a large shopping mall that was subsequently evacuated.

Ottawa Police Constable Marc Soucy told Canada’s CTV police were searching for more than one suspect and no one has been arrested.

Civic Hospital in Ottawa, the country’s capital, has received three patients, two of whom are in stable condition.

Earlier on Wednesday, witnesses told CTV they saw a man with long hair carrying a rifle and heard four shots fired at the soldier, who was guarding Canada’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

A witness told Canada’s CBC the gunman then ran the short distance to Canada’s Parliament, jumped a wall, stopped a car at gunpoint and hijacked it, the witness said. The driver got out safely, then the man drove the car to the Centre Block on Parliament Hill where senior government leaders have their offices.

WATCH: Dramatic Moments Inside Parliament as Gunfire Is Heard

More ABC news videos | ABC Health News

A CBC reporter inside the Canadian Parliament reported chaos there, hearing lots of gunshots. A lawmaker tweeted more than 30 shots were heard inside Parliament’s Center Block.

All military bases in Canada have been put on lock down in response to the events in Ottawa, CTV reported. The U.S. Embassy in Ottawa recently followed suit.

Senior FBI and Department of Homeland Security officials told ABC News they are closely monitoring the situation. The White House said President Obama has been briefed.

Canada raised its national terrorism alert level on Wednesday, following an incident Monday in which a Canadian soldier was killed in a hit-and-run by a man suspected to have been a radicalized jihadist.

“This level means that intelligence has indicated that an individual or group within Canada or abroad has the intent and capability to commit an act of terrorism,” Jean-Christophe de Le Rue, a spokesman for the Public Safety Ministry said, according to AFP.

WATCH: Active Shooter Situation at Three Locations Near Canadian Parliament

More ABC news videos | ABC Health News

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Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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Stockbyte/Thinkstock(ATLANTA) — All people returning to the United States from Ebola-affected countries will undergo 21-day monitoring, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced on Wednesday.

Travelers arriving from Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, where Ebola has killed more than 4,000 people since the worst outbreak of the virus in history began in March, will be given a home kit with a thermometer and Ebola information so that they can self-monitor and report to the CDC, according to the agency.

If they do not report, officials will track them down, the CDC said.

Travelers will need to take their temperature twice daily and answer several questions about their symptoms, according to the CDC.

The program will focus on the six states that see about 70 percent of the traffic from these regions: Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia.

Some states may monitor these travelers in person.

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iStock/Thinkstock(OTTOWA, Ontario) — Heavily-armed police cleared Canada’s Parliament building Wednesday and are searching for three suspects after a trio of shooting incidents near the Parliament left a soldier wounded. Gunfire was heard inside Parliament.

One of the three suspects was “dealt with,” according to a spokesman for the Ottawa Police.

The gunfire prompted security force to hustle Prime Minister Stephen Harper to a “safe” place not at Parliament Hill, his spokesperson said. Harper’s usual office is in a building near the shooting site.

“The prime minister is safe and not on Parliament Hill and being briefed by security officials,” his spokesman Jason MacDonald said.

[WATCH LIVE COVERAGE FROM ABC NEWS]

Ottawa Police said via Twitter the initial shooting took place at 9:52 a.m. at the National War Memorial of Canada, but that was just the beginning of the violent episode, which has now stretched into investigations in two other locations: Parliament Hill and the nearby Rideau Centre, a large shopping mall that was subsequently evacuated.

Ottawa Police Constable Marc Soucy told Canada’s CTV police were searching for more than one suspect and no one has been arrested.

Civic Hospital in Ottawa, the country’s capital, has received three patients, two of whom are in stable condition.

Earlier on Wednesday, witnesses told CTV they saw a man with long hair carrying a rifle and heard four shots fired at the soldier, who was guarding Canada’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

A witness told Canada’s CBC the gunman then ran the short distance to Canada’s Parliament, jumped a wall, stopped a car at gunpoint and hijacked it, the witness said. The driver got out safely, then the man drove the car to the Centre Block on Parliament Hill where senior government leaders have their offices.

WATCH: Dramatic Moments Inside Parliament as Gunfire Is Heard

More ABC news videos | ABC Health News

A CBC reporter inside the Canadian Parliament reported chaos there, hearing lots of gunshots. A lawmaker tweeted more than 30 shots were heard inside Parliament’s Center Block.

All military bases in Canada have been put on lock down in response to the events in Ottawa, CTV reported. The U.S. Embassy in Ottawa recently followed suit.

Senior FBI and Department of Homeland Security officials told ABC News they are closely monitoring the situation. The White House said President Obama has been briefed.

Canada raised its national terrorism alert level on Wednesday, following an incident Monday in which a Canadian soldier was killed in a hit-and-run by a man suspected to have been a radicalized jihadist.

“This level means that intelligence has indicated that an individual or group within Canada or abroad has the intent and capability to commit an act of terrorism,” Jean-Christophe de Le Rue, a spokesman for the Public Safety Ministry said, according to AFP.

WATCH: Active Shooter Situation at Three Locations Near Canadian Parliament

More ABC news videos | ABC Health News

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Without uttering a word from the bench, the Supreme Court acted on major hot button issues in the last month concerning voting rights, abortion and gay marriage.

The cases weren’t on the Court’s argument calendar. Parties were either asking the Court to act on an emergency basis to freeze a lower court decision, or requesting that the Court step in and take a case for later in the term.

The Court responded by issuing orders that were usually only a few sentences long. We never got the majority’s reasoning, but in some cases a few of the Justices released a public dissent.

Here’s some of what we know, and what we don’t, about the hot button issues:

Voting Rights:

The court sent a strong signal that it didn’t like voting changes made too close to an election. It allowed voting restrictions to remain in effect in North Carolina, Texas and Ohio. It stopped Wisconsin’s Voter ID law from going into effect.

But Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the most senior member of the liberal wing of the Court, had a couple of things she wanted to make clear: the country, she believes, is now feeling the impact of the Court’s 2013 decision in Shelby County that invalidated a key provision of the Voting Rights Act.

In two separate dissents, she pointed out that voting restrictions in Texas and North Carolina would most likely not have been able to stand in pre-Shelby days.

She said the Texas Voter ID law “may prevent more than 600,000 registered Texas voters (about 4.5% of all registered voters) from voting in person for lack of compliant identification.”

Abortion:

The Court blocked part of Texas’ abortion law from going into effect pending appeal. Pro choice groups praised the court’s order saying that several abortion clinics — forced to close because of a lower court ruling — would be able to reopen while the merits of the case were argued.

What’s interesting in this case is that while Justices Antonin Scalia, Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas publicly dissented, Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Anthony Kennedy were publicly silent.

The court’s action was not a ruling on the merits; it simply granted an emergency application from pro-choice groups fearful that the state would be left with just seven clinics. But the silence on the part of Roberts and Kennedy gave the groups some hope that they might be able to get five votes down the road to permanently strike down provisions of the law.

Gay Marriage:

The justices cleared the way for gay marriage in several states when the Court declined to step in and review seven cases from three appeals courts. President Obama went as far as telling the New Yorker that the Court’s action was as “consequential” as anything the Court has done.

We may never know what went on behind closed doors when the justices made their decision. It would have taken four votes to grant any one of the cases. Every justice knew that if the Court chose not to take up the cases, in short order 35 states would allow gay marriage.

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