Laryn Bakker/iStock/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) — An otherwise peaceful demonstration turned violent in the streets of Baltimore Saturday night, as some protesters, angry over the death 25-year-old Freddie Grey while in police custody, broke shop windows and fought with police.

Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts said officers made 12 arrests after a small group of protesters got violent outside of Camden Yards, prompting a request by the Baltimore Orioles that fans stay inside for a time after the ten-inning game with the Red Sox.

“Officers went in, two arrest teams, and arrested a total of 12, not all at the same time, individually pulling out those people who were a part of the problem in the crowd,” Batts said.

We have made approximately 12 arrests this evening. We continue to deploy resources to keep everyone safe.

— Baltimore Police (@BaltimorePolice) April 26, 2015

Aerial footage from television helicopters showed some protesters smashing out police car windows and storefronts near Camden Yards, where the Orioles were playing a game against the Red Sox. In the game’s ninth inning, the ballpark’s digital scoreboard asked the crowd to remain inside until further notice while police got the situation under control.

Due to events outside Oriole Park at Camden Yards, spectators are asked to stay inside the stadium til further notice @Orioles @RedSox @MLB

— Baltimore OEM (@BaltimoreOEM) April 26, 2015

Citing public safety concerns, the University of Maryland Baltimore also ordered its students to shelter in place Saturday night during the protest, sending out a campus-wide alert warning “Do not leave buildings.”

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said she was disappointed with the small group of what she called agitators, and said violence was unacceptable.

“Now is a time of calm – for peace and for prayer,” she said.

At a news conference late Saturday evening, Grey’s twin sister Fredricka pleaded for peace.

“Freddy’s father and mother does not want no violence – – violence does not get justice,” Grey said.

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Abigail Hunter(KATHMANDU, Nepal) — Rescue crews were racing to pull survivors from the rubble on Sunday after a powerful earthquake struck Nepal, even as officials said the death toll had soared over 2,100.

The earthquake hit about 50 miles northwest of the capital of Kathmandu just before noon local time on Saturday, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The magnitude-7.8 quake toppled temples and triggered an avalanche on Mt. Everest.

At least 2,100 people have been killed, the Nepal Interior Ministry told ABC News on Sunday.

More than 1,000 others were injured, said the country’s finance minister, Ram Sharan Mahat.

At least 51 were also killed in India, 17 in Tibet, two in Bangladesh and two Chinese citizens died at the Nepal-China border.

Sanjay Karki, country director of Mercy Corps in Nepal, said the ground was still shaking and there were predictions that another strong quake could come.

“The hospital has been overflooded with casualties,” Karki said. “People just emptying their houses and you know, coming to open spaces, with blankets, with the children and all.”

According to the United Nations, nearly 5 million people were impacted by the earthquake, which was believed to be the worst earthquake in Nepal in more than 80 years.

Abigail Hunter, an American traveling in Bhaktapur, saw people pulling others out of buildings and using motorbikes and small trucks as makeshift ambulances. The earthquake reduced many of the temples inside the city about 30 minutes away from the capital to rubble, she said, adding that she saw “lots of people praying to the actual temples” as aftershocks hit the city.

“The streets are littered with bricks, debris, loads of dust,” said Hunter, the sister of an ABC News employee. “[It] was hard to see during the earthquake with all the dust.”

A magnitude-6.6 aftershock hit about an hour after the initial earthquake and smaller aftershocks followed in the region for hours.

Hunter said she watched as families ran to their homes to see if anyone was still inside.

“Everyone was very scared,” she said. “Lots of crying, families trying to find each other.”

[CLICK HERE TO VIEW A SLIDESHOW OF THE DAMAGE CAUSED BY THE EARTHQUAKE IN NEPAL]

Ayal Weiner-Kaplow, another American visiting Bhaktapur, said water wasn’t flowing in the city and most of the remaining food was dried junk food and crackers. He said he wandered around in search for something to eat until he came upon a restaurant.

“A restaurant owner filled us up — all of our bottles — and gave us potatoes, bread, and chicken, refused payment adamantly,” he said. “I was actually moved to tears.”

Weiner-Kaplow said most Nepalis were planning to sleep outside tonight, believing their homes were unsafe if another earthquake struck.

The quake also triggered an avalanche on Mt. Everest that killed at least 10 climbers and guides and injured many more.

David Arvan, who was set to climb Mt. Everest, said he immediately realized it was an earthquake, after having felt quakes before living in California.

“We sought shelter under a concave boulder until it subsided,” he told ABC News by email. “Some people were crying in fear during all the rumbling.”

Azim Afif, a climber from Malaysia, was at a base camp when the quake hit and everything in his tent starting shaking.

“We go out and we see a big snowstorm coming to us,” he said, adding that he saw “white, nothing else than white.”

“We are very lucky to survive,” Afif said.

The U.S. government is providing $1 million in assistance, according to the U.S. Embassy in Nepal. Disaster relief teams are en route.

Secretary of State John Kerry said in a statement, “To the people in Nepal and the region affected by this tragedy we send our heartfelt sympathies. The United States stands with you during this difficult time.”

The Pakistan Army also said it is sending relief teams.

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zabelin/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — Families of American hostages who communicate with foreign kidnappers or raise money and pay ransoms will no longer have to fear prosecution for aiding terrorist groups, a White House-ordered advisory group on U.S. hostage policy is expected to recommend, senior officials told ABC News last week.

“There will be absolutely zero chance of any family member of an American held hostage overseas ever facing jail themselves, or even the threat of prosecution, for trying to free their loved ones,” said one of three senior officials familiar with the hostage policy team’s ongoing review.

The study undertaken by the National Counterterrorism Center on orders from the Obama White House has involved interviewing many of those with tragic experience such as the parents of journalist James Foley, who were among several families alleging they were repeatedly threatened by administration officials with prosecution last summer for moving to raise millions in ransom demanded by ISIS and other groups in Syria.

Neither of the officials who confronted the Foley family, at the National Security Council and at the State Department, were in law enforcement positions. On Aug. 19, 2014 James Foley was beheaded on video by ISIS executioner and spokesman Mohammed Emwazi, a British citizen nicknamed “Jihad John” in the West.

Two more Americans, two Britons, two Japanese and one Jordanian hostage were subsequently slaughtered one by one on video by ISIS. American hostage Kayla Mueller, who was given as a gift bride to a senior ISIS leader, officials have said, was killed last February in what the terrorist group claimed was a Jordanian airstrike in Syria — a claim American officials have disputed.

Diane Foley, James Foley’s mother, told ABC News last September her family was “told very clearly three times that it was illegal for us to try to ransom our son out and that we had the possibility of being prosecuted.”

“We felt compelled. We had to attempt to raise money… What would anyone do? Give me a break,” she said in the interview last year. “We don’t want other American families to go through what we have.”

Foley said Saturday that with the new policy, which officials discussed with her last week, it seems the government is “trying to make it right in their way.”

“There’s a lot that needs to be fixed,” she told ABC News on Saturday.

The past threats were “the straw that broke the camel’s back. It was incredible,” Foley added.

She said she intends to press President Obama to accept the recommendations of the NCTC team, which will soon be “on his plate.”

After James Foley’s death, Obama administration officials publicly denied the Foleys’ allegations, which multiple sources throughout the government’s hostage recovery programs had confirmed to ABC News. Secretary of State John Kerry said during a stop in Turkey in September that he was “really taken aback” and “surprised” the Foleys were saying publicly that they felt they had been threatened by their own government prior to their son’s murder on video in August.

“I know how difficult this is, and all I can say to you is I know of no one who issued such a construction. I have no knowledge of it,” Kerry told reporters in his comments last year.

Other officials said that their colleagues had merely explained to the Foleys and other families that U.S. law forbids “supporting” terrorists even with ransom to save a loved one’s life and that any other “concessions,” such as a prisoner swap are forbidden as well.

“Without getting into the details of our private discussions with families, the law is clear that ransom payments to designated individuals or entities, such as ISIL [also called ISIS], are prohibited. It is also a matter of long standing policy that the U.S. does not grant concessions to hostage takers. Doing so would only put more Americans at risk of being taken captive,” President Obama’s National Security Council explained last year in a statement to ABC News.

But after Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was freed by the Haqqani Network in Pakistan a year ago for five Taliban leaders incarcerated in Guantanamo Bay’s military prison, many hostage families later cried foul over no swaps being offered for their loved ones. The White House responded that Bergdahl, who now faces life in prison if convicted of desertion, was considered a prisoner of war and therefore his case was different.

The hostage policy review team is headed by Army Lt. Gen. Bennet Sacolick, a former commander of the elite Delta Force counter-terrorism unit, and his NCTC staff. He told the Daily Beast last week that “we can do better” at informing hostage families about developments in their cases, which has been another criticism by the Foleys who complained they were kept in the dark during their son’s captivity.

Experts say that threatening hostages’ families with prosecution who already are suffering excruciating pain — which eventually was subsumed by grief when their loved ones were murdered by ISIS — was not only reprehensible, but sticking to a cookie-cutter policy of outlawing ransom negotiations or payments also mistakenly restricted options rather than risked encouraging more kidnappings.

“They should be allowed to do whatever they can as a civilian to get their victim or family member out of harm’s way,” former FBI agent Jack Cloonan, who has been involved in hostage negotiations, told ABC News last week.

The Foleys said last year that they had been told by Obama aides that any effort to pay ransom would be viewed as providing material support to terrorists. But, in reality, the payoffs are often pocketed by middlemen and hostage-takers rather than used to buy weapons or support terrorist operations, Cloonan said.

“I think what the President has been forced to articulate now is that we should draw a distinction and make it clear what a private citizen can do versus what the government should do,” he said.

Another retired agent, former chief FBI hostage negotiator Chris Voss, said the alleged strong-arm tactics used by some government officials “was a horrible thing to do to the families” and was “the symptom of an uncoordinated government response.”

“No one who was in a position to make prosecutorial decisions was making the threats. So threats were being made by people who didn’t understand the policies. I think it was an indicator of lack of functionality in the government,” Voss said in an interview.

It also didn’t save lives.

Besides the four Americans killed by ISIS in Syria, one American and a South African were killed during a hostage rescue attempt by Navy SEALs in Yemen in December. American Warren Weinstein and an Italian hostage, Giovanni Lo Porto, were killed accidentally in a CIA drone strike targeting Al Qaeda in Pakistan in January. A person familiar with Weinstein’s ordeal said the family attempted to pay around $250,000 to the men believed to be holding him, but it came to nothing.

There are at least two more Americans, Caitlan Coleman and her toddler child, publicly known to be Taliban captives in Pakistan.

Voss said he’s concerned that a negative affect of looking the other way when ransoms are collected and paid by families is that they won’t have FBI input on the mechanics of a process the victims have never engaged in previously.

Two former officials told ABC News that payoffs to hostage-takers in some cases are allowed under the secret National Security Presidential Directive-12 if a ransom is paid as part of a sting operation or to bring the perpetrators to justice.

Another conceivable benefit to paying a ransom is to gain intelligence by tracing the cash and how it is spent.

“The issue is not whether or not ransom is paid, the issue is how it’s paid,” Voss explained. “The practical matter is money is very traceable. You just have to know what money to trace. It’s not hard at all. Put the money in the terrorists’ hands, find out who they’re buying weapons from because you’re going to follow the money. Find out who they’re buying medical supplies from.”

Will paying extortion fees encourage more kidnappings of Americans overseas? Voss insisted that most who are abducted in the Middle East’s warzones are simply targets of opportunity.

“I don’t think this is going to lead to more kidnappings at all,” he said.

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iStockPhoto/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) — The Blackhawks are moving on in the Stanley Cup Playoffs. Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith scored the winning goal late in the third period as Chicago defeated the Nashville Predators on Saturday Night, 4-3 to win their first-round series in six games.

Nashville jumped out to a quick 2-0 lead in the opening period with a pair of goals from forward James Neal. They would increase their lead to 3-1, 11:16 into the first period on center Matt Cullen’s goal.

Chicago would roar back with goals from center Jonathan Toews and forward Patrick Kane to even the score at 3-3 entering the second period.

Predators goaltender Pekka Rinne stopped 28-of-32 goals attempted while Corey Crawford and Scott Darling were a combined 22-of-25 for Chicago.

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iStockPhoto/Thinkstock(CHICAGO) — The Blackhawks are moving on in the Stanley Cup Playoffs. Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith scored the winning goal late in the third period as Chicago defeated the Nashville Predators on Saturday Night, 4-3 to win their first-round series in six games.

Nashville jumped out to a quick 2-0 lead in the opening period with a pair of goals from forward James Neal. They would increase their lead to 3-1, 11:16 into the first period on center Matt Cullen’s goal.

Chicago would roar back with goals from center Jonathan Toews and forward Patrick Kane to even the score at 3-3 entering the second period.

Predators goaltender Pekka Rinne stopped 28-of-32 goals attempted while Corey Crawford and Scott Darling were a combined 22-of-25 for Chicago.

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ABC News(BALTIMORE) — Demonstrators took to the streets of Baltimore on Saturday afternoon to protest the death of Freddie Grey while in police custody.

The crowd, which numbered in the hundreds, marched to Baltimore City Hall from the area where Grey was arrested in West Baltimore, stopping at iconic locations such as outside of Camden Yards and along Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.

In anticipation of the march, police set up barricades and blocked off streets around City Hall to allow protesters to let them gain access on foot.

“We have extensive law enforcement resources to assist; some will be seen, some will not,” said Baltimore Police Deputy Commissioner Dean Palmere.

On Friday, police released a new video of Grey’s arrest, showing the 25-year-old screaming and unable to walk as officers dragged him into a transport van.

Protesters such as Ted Sutton are upset that the 6 officers involved in the incident haven’t been charged, and are instead suspended with pay.

“I know if this situation isn’t resolved, it’s going to be unrest,” said Sutton.

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Dallas Mavericks/NBA(NEW YORK) — Dallas Mavericks head coach Rick Carlisle was fined $25,000 by the NBA Saturday for his criticizing of officials after his team’s Game 3 playoff loss to the Houston Rockets Friday.

“I have strong feelings about how I feel about my team, and I’m going to fight for my team,” Carlisle said Saturday. “That’s just the way it’s going to be. I’m a lot like my owner. I’m going to fight for my guys. I understand the fine. I accept it, and I think they’ll put the money to very good use.”

At his Game 3 postgame press conference Carlisle complained about some of the physical play on the court. He then talked specifically talked about a play that occurred at the beginning of the fourth quarter that involved Rockets center Dwight Howard.

“We’re scrambling like hell defensively and Devin Harris is going to get the ball, and Dwight Howard throws him into our bench,” Carlisle said. “He takes the ball, skips it over the top and (Trevor) Ariza gets a wide-open 3. So instead of us getting the ball and a foul on Howard, it turns into essentially a five- six-point swing.

“That stuff’s got to stop. The officials got to get that stuff under control, because there’s too much physical stuff going on. Howard is throwing people all over the place, and that can’t happen in Game 4.”

The Rockets lead the best-of-seven series 3-0. Game 4 is Sunday night in Dallas.

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Bruce Bennett/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — After losing six times to the Atlanta Hawks this season the Brooklyn Nets finally won a game.

Brook Lopez had 23 points and 13 boards to lead the Nets to a 91-83 victory over the Hawks Saturday, in Game 3 of their first round playoff series.

Brooklyn, which lost all four games it played against Atlanta in the regular season, trailed by four with 2:39 remaining in third quarter before going on an 18-0 run. The Nets never trailed from there as they win to cut the best-of-seven series deficit to 2-1.

“I think they’re a confident group, just like we are. It’s the playoffs,” Hawks head coach Mike Budenholzer said. “I think they’ve played well really for stretches from the beginning and it’s going to be a series.”

After scoring only two points in Game 2, Thaddeus Young bounced back with 18 points and 11 boards in the win.

“No matter what or how I felt about Game 2, I knew I had to come back and bounce back in Game 3 for us to get a win,” Young said.

DeMarre Carroll scored a playoff career-high 22 points in the loss.

The eighth-seeded Nets will try to even the series in Brooklyn on Monday.

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Stocktrek Images/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Government is offering help to Nepal after Saturday’s massive 7.8 earthquake.

The U.S. is sending disaster response teams to Nepal to help in the search for survivors.

A team from USAID will determine how much long term help the United States can provide, including a specialized search and rescue team from Virginia to help search for survivors.

The U.S. is providing an initial $1 million to help with quake relief, with more aid expected in coming days.

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U.S. Navy(LANAI, Hawaii) — A fisherman who was rescued last year after spending 12 days missing at sea vanished again when his fishing boat capsized off Hawaii.

The Coast Guard began searching for Ron Ingraham early Friday, hours after his fishing vessel ran aground near Lanai, Hawaii. The Coast Guard found his boat, named “Munchkin,” and Kenny Corder, who was also aboard, a few hours later.

Ingraham, 67, was not wearing a life jacket when the boat crashed into some rocks off the island, Corder told the Coast Guard. Corder was taken to a hospital in Maui and was reportedly in good condition.

Ingraham went missing Nov. 27 after placing two mayday calls saying his boat was in danger of sinking. He was found on Dec. 9.

“I thought I was going to die,” Ingraham told Coast Guard sailors after they found him. “You guys are heroes.”

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