Richard Heathcote/Getty Images(KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia) — The 2022 Winter Olympics are headed to China.

The International Olympic Committee announced on Friday that Beijing will be the host city for the Games. The IOC made its decision in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia after hearing final appeals from officials representing Beijing and Almaty, Kazakhstan, the other city in contention.

Beijing now becomes the first city to host both the Summer and Winter Olympics after it hosted the Summer Games in 2008.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — A boiling standoff between Republican leaders in the House and Senate is settling.

In a 65-34 vote, the Senate on Thursday passed a long-term, $350 billion highway funding bill that would last six years. The move now sets up discussions with the House over the future course of transportation funding.

“The House has now indicated as a result of our passing a multi-year bill, they intend to do it in early September and we’ll go to conference. And the goal of the conference obviously will be to get a result,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said after the vote.

The House began its summer recess on Thursday; senators will begin theirs next Friday.

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iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Generation Z is notorious for being glued to their phones and spending countless hours on social media like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat. And, according to a new study, all that time spent on social media may be making them unhappy.

Research conducted by the Ottawa Public Health agency, and published in the Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking journal, finds that teens who spend more than two hours on social media each day are more likely to suffer from mental health problems, psychological distress and suicidal thoughts.

Data was pulled from a sample of 750 teens in grades 7-12, collected for the 2013 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. Of that sample, about 25 percent of students said they spend more than two hours daily on social media, and those students were more likely to report poor mental health.

These results do not prove causality, but researchers suspect that the relationships between social media use and mental health occur in both ways. Teens with mental health issues may turn to social media for connection, while using social media frequently may lead to mental health issues over time.

“It could be that teens with mental health problems are seeking out interactions as they are feeling isolated and alone,” lead author Dr. Hugues Sampasa-Kanyinga tells The Huffington Post in an email. “Or they would like to satisfy unmet needs for face-to-face mental health support.”

Still, the issue is complex, says Sampasa-Kanyinga, and looking only at social media use is not sufficient to explain the cause of mental health issues.

Think it’s time for teens to stop tapping their thumbs? Dr. Brenda K. Wiederhold of the Interactive Media Institute in San Diego says not necessarily.

“We see social networking sites, which may be a problem for some, also being a solution,” says Wiederhold in a statement, reacting to the study’s findings. “Since teens are on the sites, it is the perfect place for public health and service providers to reach out and connect with this vulnerable population and provide health promotion systems and supports.”

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iStock Editorial/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Generation Z is notorious for being glued to their phones and spending countless hours on social media like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat. And, according to a new study, all that time spent on social media may be making them unhappy.

Research conducted by the Ottawa Public Health agency, and published in the Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking journal, finds that teens who spend more than two hours on social media each day are more likely to suffer from mental health problems, psychological distress and suicidal thoughts.

Data was pulled from a sample of 750 teens in grades 7-12, collected for the 2013 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. Of that sample, about 25 percent of students said they spend more than two hours daily on social media, and those students were more likely to report poor mental health.

These results do not prove causality, but researchers suspect that the relationships between social media use and mental health occur in both ways. Teens with mental health issues may turn to social media for connection, while using social media frequently may lead to mental health issues over time.

“It could be that teens with mental health problems are seeking out interactions as they are feeling isolated and alone,” lead author Dr. Hugues Sampasa-Kanyinga tells The Huffington Post in an email. “Or they would like to satisfy unmet needs for face-to-face mental health support.”

Still, the issue is complex, says Sampasa-Kanyinga, and looking only at social media use is not sufficient to explain the cause of mental health issues.

Think it’s time for teens to stop tapping their thumbs? Dr. Brenda K. Wiederhold of the Interactive Media Institute in San Diego says not necessarily.

“We see social networking sites, which may be a problem for some, also being a solution,” says Wiederhold in a statement, reacting to the study’s findings. “Since teens are on the sites, it is the perfect place for public health and service providers to reach out and connect with this vulnerable population and provide health promotion systems and supports.”

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YANNICK PITOU/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — U.S. intelligence agencies put together an assessment in the wake of the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 indicating that the plane was deliberately taken off course, according to a source with knowledge of the matter.

The assessment — made months ago and concerning what most likely happened to the plane, which disappeared in March 2014 — also said that the Boeing 777 was potentially deliberately downed, the source said.

However, according to the source, the assessment “doesn’t matter” and was built on information that intelligence officials could glean about the foreign investigation into the disappearance.

Those foreign investigators “are the ones who ultimately will make the conclusion” of what happened to MH370.

The revelation comes as investigators were trying to piece together whether an airplane part that washed up on the shore of Reunion Island came from the doomed flight.

Based on a part number that was visible in pictures, Boeing workers believe it came from a 777, the same type of plane as MH370, according to a U.S. official.

In the wake of the discovery, a worker found a tattered piece of luggage on the same beach.

The origin of the piece of luggage has not been determined, but it was seized by local police for examination.

Investigators were treating the airplane part, believed to be a “flaperon,” as a major lead into the disappearance of the plane.

Flaperons help to stabilize the plane, especially at low speeds such as takeoff and landing.

“If this wreckage [is] from MH370, it’s an important breakthrough, particularly for families,” said Australian Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss. “The families who have been involved with this long, long, long, long wait, for them to have some degree of closure would be great comfort.”

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Paramount(NEW YORK) — Due to its many moving parts, characters and twists, some people are going to find the plot of Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation a bit complicated, but it’s quite simple, really.

Tom Cruise’s Ethan Hunt believes there’s a rogue international network of former spies called “The Syndicate.” The CIA doesn’t believe him and wants to put the IMF and Hunt out of business. After the Government decides to shut the IMF down, Brandt (Jeremy Renner) and tech genius Dunn (Simon Pegg) become part of the CIA, while Hunt hides from the Feds and tries to prove the Syndicate is real.

In the meantime, Hunt seems to have met his match in Syndicate member Ilsa Faust (Rebecca Ferguson) and Syndicate founder Lane (Sean Harris). Can Ethan and friends survive their biggest challenge yet? See? It really is a simple question.

Part of what makes the MI franchise so great (with the exception of MI: 3, which was really mediocre) is its fearless leader, and Tom Cruise truly does seem to be fearless. In Ghost Protocol he scaled the Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world (no relation to Wiz). This time, he hangs from the door of an airplane, which he apparently did eight times, for eight takes. Yes, when Tom Cruise is involved, no stuntman is required, and that risky business – pun intended — has helped make him, at age 53, our greatest action star.

Let’s simplify this even further:

Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation is AMAZING.

While the Fast and Furious franchise continues to be fun and exhilarating, nobody would ever accuse the filmmakers of producing a thoughtful, action-packed thriller. But MI: Rogue Nation is exactly that and then some. Cruise’s favorite writer and director Christopher McQuarrie, who wrote and directed Jack Reacher, and wrote Edge Of Tomorrow, goes above and beyond with great visual cues and choices, expertly balancing suspense and fun.

Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation lives up to the franchise name, presenting us with a successful outcome to the seemingly impossible mission of producing a truly excellent summertime action flick.

Four-and-a-half out of five stars.

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Kelsey McNeal/WE tv(NEW YORK) — Reality star Tami Roman and her boyfriend, Reggie Youngblood, suffered a miscarriage.

A rep for the couple, who currently star on WeTV’s Marriage Boot Camp, told TMZ the two are “mourning their loss with close friends and family. The couple requests prayers and privacy as they get through this difficult time.”

Reportedly, Roman was three months pregnant.

Although Roman has two daughters from a previous relationship, it would’ve been the first child for Youngblood.

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Kelsey McNeal/WE tv(NEW YORK) — Reality star Tami Roman and her boyfriend, Reggie Youngblood, suffered a miscarriage.

A rep for the couple, who currently star on WeTV’s Marriage Boot Camp, told TMZ the two are “mourning their loss with close friends and family. The couple requests prayers and privacy as they get through this difficult time.”

Reportedly, Roman was three months pregnant.

Although Roman has two daughters from a previous relationship, it would’ve been the first child for Youngblood.

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Zach Anderson, 19, and his parents are fighting to appeal his sentence and have his name removed from the sex offender registry. ABC News(ST. JOSEPH, Mich.) — When Les and Amanda Anderson went to pick up their son from a county jail in St. Joseph, Michigan, it was the first time they had seen him in two and half months.

“I was thinking just coming up here it’s like he shouldn’t be here,” Les Anderson said. “This, you know, it shouldn’t be happening.”

Since his release last month, their son Zach Anderson’s freedom has been severely restricted because at just 19 years old, Zach is a convicted sex offender.

Zach was arrested last winter after having sex with a girl he met on the dating app “Hot or Not,” who claimed she was 17. But she admitted to police that was a lie. She was really 14.

If he had known she was so young, Zach said, he never would have met her.

“I wouldn’t even have gone to her house, like I literally wouldn’t have gone to her house at all,” he said.

As a convicted sex offender, the terms of Zach’s probation are incredibly strict. For the next five years, he is forbidden from owning a smart phone or using the Internet. He is not allowed to talk to anyone under age 17, other than immediate family. He is banned from going to any establishment that serves alcohol and he has to be home before 8 p.m. every night.

“They make me out to be a monster,” Zach said. “I can’t even look at life regularly.”

His parents say his punishment is cruel and unusual, and they are waging a very public fight, even setting up a Facebook page, hoping to rally support for their son.

Zach graduated high school just last year. Like many teens, he turned to his smart phone to find a date one night. He says he was on the dating app “Hot or Not” for about a week when he started talking to the 14-year-old.

“[She] was actually the first person I had met up with or anything from that,” Zach said. “I had asked her when we were messaging. I said, ‘How old are you?’ And then she had told me 17… I just got out of high school. So it’s two years difference. I didn’t think that was a big deal or anything.”

The then-14-year-old girl falsely registered on the “adults” section of the dating app. Zach said after they connected, they flirted through text messages and arranged to meet in her hometown of Niles, Michigan, 20 miles across the state line from Zach’s home in Indiana.

“I had been with one other girl before that,” Zach said. “But she was 18, and I was 18, and I kind of just did it to get, you know, to do it, because I was 18.”

Zach picked the then-14-year-old girl up and they drove to a playground in Niles, where they had sex.

Unbeknownst to them, the girl’s mother had called police that night because she thought her daughter was missing. Two months later, detectives showed up at Zach’s job at a mechanic shop.

“I was in the middle of an oil change and my friend who was working there came into the back and was like, ‘There are two detectives here, Zach. They want to talk to you,’” Zach said. “And my hearts pounding like crazy so yeah I knew something was going down. I told my parents that night.”

Zach was arrested and eventually pleaded guilty to fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct. After admitting that she had lied about her age, the now 15-year-old and her mother even testified on Zach’s behalf at his trial.

According to court documents, the girl’s mother told the judge, “I don’t want him to be a sex offender because he really is not.” Her daughter added, “I feel nothing should happen to Zach.”

But the judge condemned what he called a culture of “meet, hook-up, have sex, sayonara, totally inappropriate behavior,” according to court documents. Zach was sentenced to 90 days in jail and ordered to register as a sex offender.

“The hardest part probably for me was to see him being led away, because he turned and looked at us, and it’s like, we want to give him a hug, and you don’t even have that opportunity,” said his father, Les Anderson.

Zach will be listed on the sex offender registry until 2040. His parents say the label is incredibly unfair.

“We don’t see him that way,” Les Anderson said. “If our son’s a sex offender, there’s a lot of other people on that list like him which dilutes the list, and it almost makes it meaningless.”

Making matters worse, Michigan, where the crime occurred, is a state that does not provide an automatic defense if the victim lies about her age.

“We’re not talking about loosening the law, no one’s indicating that someone who preys on a young adult in a predatory manner shouldn’t be prosecuted, they absolutely should be,” said Zach’s attorney Scott Grabel. “This is an instance in my opinion that you rarely get to say the defendant had no criminal intent, and I don’t think the defendant was even negligent in engaging in the encounter.”

Now on probation, Zach is trying to live his life as best he can within the restrictions of his probation. Since he is not allowed to use a computer, his budding career in computer science is now over.

“I could have had a really good career in that, and now I can’t do that,” he said. “I can’t really have an actual career. I’m going to be working a job, but not doing something I enjoy doing.”

Convicted sex offenders are forbidden from visiting any public park, which eliminated Zach’s favorite activity: skateboarding. He also wasn’t allowed to live in his parents’ house because it was 800 feet of a public boat ramp, just shy of the 1,000-foot distance minimum.

“They’re forcing him to leave jail, go to a house, and be by yourself, and be lonely basically,” Les Anderson said. “It wasn’t easy to find a place to live either. I mean because of all of the restrictions. You almost cannot live in the city here at all because you have to be so many feet from a school, a church.”

Zach’s parents were forced to dip into their savings for legal fees and to buy Zach a fixer-upper home on the other side of town that met the distance requirement.

Michigan state Sen. Rick Jones, who helped write the state’s sex offender registry law, says Zach should have been more careful.

“As you grow up, I mean young men are told you know in high school, 15 is jailbait,” Jones said. “Now that’s a slang term, but that’s what young men are told … I would hope that somebody who was 19 years old would say ‘Well do you have a driver’s license or something? You don’t appear to be the appropriate age.’”

Next week, the Andersons will go back to court to appeal Zach’s sentence. The goal is for Zach to be removed from the sex offender registry. But they say their fight is bigger than their son alone.

“We hope that they stop putting people on the sex offender registry like they’re passing out traffic tickets,” Amanda Anderson said. “There are hundreds and hundreds of people that don’t deserve to be on that list, and it’s supposed to be a safeguard for the community. And instead, they’re just publicly shaming these people and our son for life.”

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Zach Anderson, 19, and his parents are fighting to appeal his sentence and have his name removed from the sex offender registry. ABC News(ST. JOSEPH, Mich.) — When Les and Amanda Anderson went to pick up their son from a county jail in St. Joseph, Michigan, it was the first time they had seen him in two and half months.

“I was thinking just coming up here it’s like he shouldn’t be here,” Les Anderson said. “This, you know, it shouldn’t be happening.”

Since his release last month, their son Zach Anderson’s freedom has been severely restricted because at just 19 years old, Zach is a convicted sex offender.

Zach was arrested last winter after having sex with a girl he met on the dating app “Hot or Not,” who claimed she was 17. But she admitted to police that was a lie. She was really 14.

If he had known she was so young, Zach said, he never would have met her.

“I wouldn’t even have gone to her house, like I literally wouldn’t have gone to her house at all,” he said.

As a convicted sex offender, the terms of Zach’s probation are incredibly strict. For the next five years, he is forbidden from owning a smart phone or using the Internet. He is not allowed to talk to anyone under age 17, other than immediate family. He is banned from going to any establishment that serves alcohol and he has to be home before 8 p.m. every night.

“They make me out to be a monster,” Zach said. “I can’t even look at life regularly.”

His parents say his punishment is cruel and unusual, and they are waging a very public fight, even setting up a Facebook page, hoping to rally support for their son.

Zach graduated high school just last year. Like many teens, he turned to his smart phone to find a date one night. He says he was on the dating app “Hot or Not” for about a week when he started talking to the 14-year-old.

“[She] was actually the first person I had met up with or anything from that,” Zach said. “I had asked her when we were messaging. I said, ‘How old are you?’ And then she had told me 17… I just got out of high school. So it’s two years difference. I didn’t think that was a big deal or anything.”

The then-14-year-old girl falsely registered on the “adults” section of the dating app. Zach said after they connected, they flirted through text messages and arranged to meet in her hometown of Niles, Michigan, 20 miles across the state line from Zach’s home in Indiana.

“I had been with one other girl before that,” Zach said. “But she was 18, and I was 18, and I kind of just did it to get, you know, to do it, because I was 18.”

Zach picked the then-14-year-old girl up and they drove to a playground in Niles, where they had sex.

Unbeknownst to them, the girl’s mother had called police that night because she thought her daughter was missing. Two months later, detectives showed up at Zach’s job at a mechanic shop.

“I was in the middle of an oil change and my friend who was working there came into the back and was like, ‘There are two detectives here, Zach. They want to talk to you,’” Zach said. “And my hearts pounding like crazy so yeah I knew something was going down. I told my parents that night.”

Zach was arrested and eventually pleaded guilty to fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct. After admitting that she had lied about her age, the now 15-year-old and her mother even testified on Zach’s behalf at his trial.

According to court documents, the girl’s mother told the judge, “I don’t want him to be a sex offender because he really is not.” Her daughter added, “I feel nothing should happen to Zach.”

But the judge condemned what he called a culture of “meet, hook-up, have sex, sayonara, totally inappropriate behavior,” according to court documents. Zach was sentenced to 90 days in jail and ordered to register as a sex offender.

“The hardest part probably for me was to see him being led away, because he turned and looked at us, and it’s like, we want to give him a hug, and you don’t even have that opportunity,” said his father, Les Anderson.

Zach will be listed on the sex offender registry until 2040. His parents say the label is incredibly unfair.

“We don’t see him that way,” Les Anderson said. “If our son’s a sex offender, there’s a lot of other people on that list like him which dilutes the list, and it almost makes it meaningless.”

Making matters worse, Michigan, where the crime occurred, is a state that does not provide an automatic defense if the victim lies about her age.

“We’re not talking about loosening the law, no one’s indicating that someone who preys on a young adult in a predatory manner shouldn’t be prosecuted, they absolutely should be,” said Zach’s attorney Scott Grabel. “This is an instance in my opinion that you rarely get to say the defendant had no criminal intent, and I don’t think the defendant was even negligent in engaging in the encounter.”

Now on probation, Zach is trying to live his life as best he can within the restrictions of his probation. Since he is not allowed to use a computer, his budding career in computer science is now over.

“I could have had a really good career in that, and now I can’t do that,” he said. “I can’t really have an actual career. I’m going to be working a job, but not doing something I enjoy doing.”

Convicted sex offenders are forbidden from visiting any public park, which eliminated Zach’s favorite activity: skateboarding. He also wasn’t allowed to live in his parents’ house because it was 800 feet of a public boat ramp, just shy of the 1,000-foot distance minimum.

“They’re forcing him to leave jail, go to a house, and be by yourself, and be lonely basically,” Les Anderson said. “It wasn’t easy to find a place to live either. I mean because of all of the restrictions. You almost cannot live in the city here at all because you have to be so many feet from a school, a church.”

Zach’s parents were forced to dip into their savings for legal fees and to buy Zach a fixer-upper home on the other side of town that met the distance requirement.

Michigan state Sen. Rick Jones, who helped write the state’s sex offender registry law, says Zach should have been more careful.

“As you grow up, I mean young men are told you know in high school, 15 is jailbait,” Jones said. “Now that’s a slang term, but that’s what young men are told … I would hope that somebody who was 19 years old would say ‘Well do you have a driver’s license or something? You don’t appear to be the appropriate age.’”

Next week, the Andersons will go back to court to appeal Zach’s sentence. The goal is for Zach to be removed from the sex offender registry. But they say their fight is bigger than their son alone.

“We hope that they stop putting people on the sex offender registry like they’re passing out traffic tickets,” Amanda Anderson said. “There are hundreds and hundreds of people that don’t deserve to be on that list, and it’s supposed to be a safeguard for the community. And instead, they’re just publicly shaming these people and our son for life.”

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