Ana Walshe: Former prosecutor says there’s ‘more than enough evidence’ to convict Bryan Walshe without body

A former prosecutor says that there’s “more than enough evidence” to convict Brian Walshe after he was charged with murder in the disappearance of his wife Ana Walshe, even without a body.

The Norfolk District Attorney’s Office announced on Tuesday that Brian Walshe is being charged with the murder of Ana Walshe after she went missing on New Year’s Day.

“Norfolk District Attorney Michael Morrissey [announced] the issuance of a murder warrant in the death of Ana Walshe, 39, missing from Cohasset since on or about New Year’s Day,” a statement from the district attorney’s office said.

Brian Walshe is also being charged with improper transport of a body, according to a spokesperson for the district attorney’s office.

BRIAN WALSHE CHARGED IN ANA WALSHE’S MURDER IN MASSACHUSETTS

Brian and Ana Walshe seen in September 2016.
(Ana Walshe/Facebook)

Previously, Brian Walshe was charged with misleading a police investigation after he allegedly lied about where he had been.

According to investigators, Brian Walshe told them that he traveled to stores like CVS and Whole Foods, but might have not actually been there.

Brian Walshe also didn’t state that he used $450 in cash to buy cleaning supplies from a Rockland, Massachusetts, Home Depot store.

Ana Walshe on her wedding day in Emmanuel Episcopal church on Newbury St., Boston, Massachusetts on Monday, December 21, 2015.
(Obtained by Fox News Digital)

Court documents state that he was seen on surveillance video “wearing a black surgical mask, blue surgical gloves and making a cash purchase” to buy items like mops, tape, and drop cloths.

According to investigators, a bloody, damaged knife was found in the basement of the couple’s Cohasset home.

Two law enforcement agents also told CNN that Brian Walshe searched online for “how to dispose of a 115-pound woman’s body” as well as how to dismember a body.

TIMELINE OF ANA WALSHE’S DISAPPEARANCE AND BRIAN WALSHE’S ARREST

Brian and Ana Walshe pose up for a shot in Boston Public Gardens, Boston, Massachusetts on their wedding day on Monday, December 21, 2015
(Obtained by Fox News Digital)

“I’m glad that they did finally arrest him because there’s more than enough evidence,” Former Assistant U.S. Attorney Neama Rahmani told Fox News Digital. “I know they’re looking in different trash sites and they found like a hacksaw, some other tools that they believe were used to dismember the body.”

He said that police are likely going to be pressing Brian Walshe and asking him the location of a potential body, but said that authorities likely have a plethora of evidence.

“I’m not saying that police and prosecutors need a body in this case because there’s so much other evidence, direct, circumstantial,” Rahmani said.

MISSING ANA WALSHE: ROMANCE WITH BRIAN WALSHE WAS ‘LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT’

Brian Walshe’s mugshot.
(Cohasset Police Department )

When searching a waste facility near the home of Brian Walshe’s mother, investigators recovered a hacksaw, a hatchet, a rug and a bloodied trash bag, according to WBZ.

Criminal defense attorney Mark Geragos told Fox News Digital that authorities likely have DNA evidence that is consistent with Ana Walshe.

“So they feel confident enough based on what they found either there or at the transfer station or at the house itself,” Geragos said, adding that “one of the worst facts is how to dispose of a 115 pound body if that, in fact, is in the search bar of his computer.”

Geragos said that Brian Walshe’s “big worry now is not enhancing his sentence, his big worry is what evidence do they have, and how are you going to explain it?”

Iris Eytan, a criminal defense attorney who represented clients such as Barry Morphew, whose murder charges were dismissed after his wife went missing in 2020, said that the public should be careful in jumping to any conclusions.

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“I think it’s really important for the media and for the public to be extremely cautious about jumping to any conclusions,” Eytan said. “We know maybe 1% of what the prosecution knows and the prosecution maybe knows 20% about, you know, what events, you know, led to her disappearance.”