Supreme Court declines to hear another challenge to federal bump stock ban

The Supreme Court declined to hear another challenge on Monday to the federal ban on bump stocks, which enable a semi-automatic gun to fire like a fully automatic weapon.

The Trump administration enacted the ban following the 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas, which left 58 people dead and hundreds of others injured.

The gunman in that shooting used rifles, many of them fitted with bump stock devices, to fire more than 1,000 rounds in 11 minutes into a crow of 22,000 people at a country music concert.

A bump stock is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah.
(Associated Press)

Bump stocks attach to the butt of a rifle and harness the recoil of the gun to allow it to fire in rapid succession.

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The case that the Supreme Court declined to hear on Monday leaves in place a lower court’s decision to reject efforts by bump stock owners to be compensated for bump stocks that they legally purchased but were required to give up in 2019 after the Trump administration’s ban went into effect.

The Supreme Court rejected two other challenges to the ban last month.

A bump stock is installed on an AK-47 and its movement is demonstrated at Good Guys Gun and Range on February 21, 2018, in Orem, Utah.
(George Frey/Getty Images)

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Separately, in a win for gun rights advocates, the Supreme Court ruled 6-3 earlier this year to strike down a law in New York that made it difficult to obtain a license to carry a concealed handgun.

It was the first major gun rights case to go before the Supreme Court in more than a decade.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.