Former Pittsburgh Pirates All-Star Frank Thomas dead at 93

 

Former Major League Baseball player Frank Thomas passed away on Monday in his hometown of Pittsburgh.

No cause of death was given. He was 93.

Thomas was a three-time All-Star with the Pittsburgh Pirates, having played 16 seasons in the big leagues from 1951 to 1966.

He spent three years with the Mets, being one of the first members of New York’s expansion team in 1962.

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Frank Thomas #15 of the Pittsburgh Pirates poses for a portrait during Spring Training circa March 1957 in Fort Myers, Florida.
(Hy Peskin/Getty Images)

Both the Mets and Pirates confirmed Thomas’ death on Twitter, with the Mets writing: “We are deeply saddened to learn of the passing of original Met Frank Thomas.”

For his career, Thomas held a .266 batting average to go along with 286 home runs and 962 runs batted in, while playing for the Pirates, Mets, Chicago Cubs, Philadelphia Phillies, Milwaukee Braves, Cincinnati Reds and Houston Astros.

He is survived by his seven children.

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Jubilant members of the Pittsburgh Pirates celebrate in dressing room here 6/6 after beating the Cubs, 8-2, to retain their slim lead as league leaders.
(Getty Images)

Nicknamed “The Original,” Thomas made it to Citi Field in late August when the Mets held their first Old-Timers’ Day in 28 years.

“This is my last fling for baseball,” he said that day.

Pittsburgh Pirates “Big Guns” Roberto Clemente, Frank Thomas, Lee Walls, and Bill Virdon (L to R) set their sights on the National League pennant in this pose in their dugout.
(Getty Images)

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Primarily an outfielder and third baseman, Thomas was selected to National League All-Star teams in 1954, ’55 and ’58, when he set career bests with 35 homers, 109 RBIs and an .863 OPS.

He finished fourth in the NL MVP race that year behind Hall of Fame sluggers Ernie Banks, Willie Mays and Hank Aaron, and just ahead of another player enshrined in Cooperstown: pitcher Warren Spahn.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.