3 American tourists found dead in Mexico City Airbnb likely killed by carbon monoxide poisoning

Three American tourists were found dead in their Mexico City Airbnb in what authorities say is most likely a case of carbon monoxide poisoning.

The bodies of 28-year-olds Kandace Florence and Jordan Marshall, and 33-year-old Courtez Hall were found in an Airbnb vacation rental last month after the trio traveled to Mexico City to celebrate Dia de los Muertos, also known as Day of the Dead, New York Post reported.

Autopsy reports showed the three Americans likely died from inhaling carbon monoxide fumes, according to Bloomberg.

Florence was reportedly speaking with her boyfriend on the phone on the night of Oct. 30 when she told him that she was feeling sick and suggested that something did not feel right. The call was then dropped and her boyfriend, who was in the United States, was not able to reach her again.

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Left to right: Courtez Hall, Kadence Florence, Jordan Marshall
(Facebook)

The boyfriend contacted the Airbnb host to request a welfare check, and police arrived at the scene to find all three friends dead along with a strong stench of gas.

“We can confirm the death of three U.S. citizens in Mexico,” a spokesperson for the State Department told Fox News Digital in a statement. “We are closely monitoring local authorities’ investigation into the cause of death. We stand ready to provide all appropriate consular assistance.”

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Kandace Florence, left, and Courtez Hall.
(Facebook)

The deaths come several months after three American tourists were killed by carbon monoxide poisoning at an all-inclusive Sandals resort in the Bahamas in May.

Carbon monoxide is especially dangerous because it is an odorless gas. Individuals do not realize they are exposed to it until they become symptomatic.

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Health experts advise it is vital to have carbon monoxide detectors installed in homes, rental units, hotel rooms and more — and to know and confirm that indeed, they are placed there and fully operational during any vacation stay, no matter how short or long.

The presence of carbon monoxide in hotels is an issue travelers should have on their radars, according to a study published in Preventive Medicine Reports in 2019.

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Tourists with their face painted as skeletons listen to a tour guide explain about the event history during ‘Day of the Dead’ celebrations on Nov. 2, 2022
((Photo by Jonny Pickup/Getty Images))

The authors of that study discovered that from Jan. 1, 2005 to Dec. 31, 2018, more than 900 guests traveling in the U.S. were poisoned in 115 identified incidents — including 22 fatalities. The type of lodgings where the odorless gas was present included hotels, motels and resorts of all classes and located in a majority of states, the study said.

Americans tourists have faced dangers traveling to Mexico in several instances this year, including a man who says he was kidnapped at knife-point and violently attacked while vacationing with his wife.

This summer, two American tourists were injured in Mexico after being attacked by a crocodile.

Fox News’ Amy McGorry contributed to this report