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Purestock/Thinkstock(MOSCOW) — Western space agencies are tracking a mysterious object that was reportedly launched into space by Russia — and in turn has launched speculation about what the Kremlin could be pursuing.

The North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) has been following the puzzling object’s maneuvers under the designation 39765.

Little is known about the object other than the fact it was part of a Russian rocket launch in May that sent three satellites to join a military constellation and was originally classified as space debris, according to the Financial Times, which first reported the story.

Experts have weighed in, saying the piece could be anything from space junk to the revival of a satellite destroyer program.

“I have no idea what it is!” Patricia Lewis, a space security expert at the think-tank Chatham House told The Washington Post.

However, if it is indeed a revival of Russia’s anti-satellite weaponry program, Lewis told the newspaper it could have huge repercussions if used.

“Imagine if you were having a Katrina episode and all of your satellites suddenly got jammed,” she said.

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Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — There are approximately 8 million cars subject to an airbag recall today, according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Ten automakers in total have been affected by the recalls.

Stephanie Erdman, a Lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force, was a driver of one of the affected cars. The 29-year-old from San Antonio, Texas, bought a used 2002 Honda Civic in 2006. Erdman says she was never made aware that a few years after she purchased the vehicle, the airbags were recalled. Then, in September, 2013 she got into an accident in her car, which severely injured her.

“The airbags deployed and I had a massive strike on my right side,” Erdman said of the accident. “I just blinded out on that side and I just felt this dripping blood…It was absolutely horrible.”

Erdman later found out it was a piece of twisted metal that struck her, which she says shot out of the airbag and into her face.

“It’s an airbag,” she told ABC News. “It’s supposed to protect me.”

“The very device that’s designed to provide supplemental restraint or protection in a crash is what’s actually causing the injuries to people,” Erdman’s lawyer, Rob Ammons told ABC News.

Erdman is now suing Honda, Takata, the maker of the airbag, and the dealership that sold her the car. All of them deny responsibility.

“I think there’s certainly a moral obligation that if you’re going to be in the business of selling products, pre-owned vehicles, that you assure that there are not known defects,” Ammons said.

GMA Investigates wondered: what are used car dealers saying about the cars for sale on their lots with potentially dangerous airbags?

While automakers are required by law to notify their new car dealers and the car’s registered owner about any recalls at the time they are issued, there is currently no federal law stopping car dealers from selling cars with open recalls, or requiring used car dealers to check for them.

So ABC News producer Gerry Wagschal went undercover into nine used car lots in New York, New Jersey, and Alabama, to see what salespeople would say when we asked them about specific cars that we knew had open airbag recalls.

Of the nine dealers ABC News went to, five told our producer they didn’t know if there was an airbag recall on the car, while four dealers told our producer there was no such recall.

During our investigation, only one car dealer, in Mobile, Alabama checked for a recall on the spot. The salesman told our producer that he would Google the car’s VIN (vehicle identification number) and search for a recall. He didn’t find any information, so he then called a Honda dealer and discovered a recall on the car’s airbag.

Other dealerships told our producer that there was no airbag recalls on the vehicles we identified.

“It doesn’t have a recall for it,” a saleswoman in Paterson, New Jersey, told our producer. “No, no that I know of.”

When asked again whether there was a recall on the airbag, she replied no.

A manager at the Paterson location later told ABC News, “Usually if there is an open recall the vehicle manufacturer has to notify us and they didn’t notify us in this case…We usually don’t check the VIN in a database. In certain cases we call the dealer.”

ABC News also went to a car dealership in Hawthorne, New Jersey, to inquire about a vehicle with an open recall.

“That has zero recalls,” a salesman there told our producer.

Later the salesman told ABC News, “We didn’t get any recall notice. All cars are titled in my name. If there’s a recall on a vehicle it won’t go out the door without first checking. I get recall letters. I didn’t get a letter. I do not have a letter on that recall. Before you would have bought the vehicle I would have run a carfax and if there was a recall it would not have gone out before it was fixed. I have a Cobalt right now with a recall that is getting fixed right now at the dealer.”

Auction Direct Auto Sales in Jersey City, New Jersey, also told our producer there was no airbag recall on a vehicle. But, in fact, there was a recall, and it was one of four cars at that dealership under recall for the potentially dangerous airbags.

Later ABC News’ Gio Benitez made a return visit to the car lot.

“So listen, you told Gerry that this didn’t have a recall, but it does,” Benitez told the salesman, Roberto Tanco.

“It does?” Tanco asked.

But Roberto told ABC News it’s not his fault, it’s the manufacturer’s. And although he feels responsible for the cars he sells, he said the automaker should have sent a recall letter.

“We need somebody to let us know and that person is the company, the manufacturer,” Tanco said.

The problem is recall notices are sent at the time of the recall to the registered owner and the carmaker’s new car dealers, but sometimes never again. Also, not all used car dealers are required to register their cars. If the used car dealer did not register the car, they would not receive a recall notice.

The owner of Auction Direct Auto Sales told GMA Investigates that he hadn’t registered the SUV our producer inquired about and that, “We are not required by law to check for recalls. We don’t have time to check for open recalls.”

Even so, Tanco told ABC News that he will start checking online for recalls, and wrote down the government website to do so — www.safercar.gov — right in front our cameras.

The government agency, NHTSA runs that site and tells GMA Investigates the Department of Transportation has proposed a law that would make it illegal for used car dealers to sell cars with open recalls without fixing them.

Our ABC News investigation concluded that in many cases, it’s up to the consumer to check for open recalls before purchasing a used vehicle.

The site CARFAX, which is used by millions of consumers each year searching for vehicle history information, offers a free service at www.mycarfax.com that monitors cars for recalls. The service is also available through an application on Apple and Android devices.

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Ingram Publishing/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — There are approximately 8 million cars subject to an airbag recall today, according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Ten automakers in total have been affected by the recalls.

Stephanie Erdman, a Lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force, was a driver of one of the affected cars. The 29-year-old from San Antonio, Texas, bought a used 2002 Honda Civic in 2006. Erdman says she was never made aware that a few years after she purchased the vehicle, the airbags were recalled. Then, in September, 2013 she got into an accident in her car, which severely injured her.

“The airbags deployed and I had a massive strike on my right side,” Erdman said of the accident. “I just blinded out on that side and I just felt this dripping blood…It was absolutely horrible.”

Erdman later found out it was a piece of twisted metal that struck her, which she says shot out of the airbag and into her face.

“It’s an airbag,” she told ABC News. “It’s supposed to protect me.”

“The very device that’s designed to provide supplemental restraint or protection in a crash is what’s actually causing the injuries to people,” Erdman’s lawyer, Rob Ammons told ABC News.

Erdman is now suing Honda, Takata, the maker of the airbag, and the dealership that sold her the car. All of them deny responsibility.

“I think there’s certainly a moral obligation that if you’re going to be in the business of selling products, pre-owned vehicles, that you assure that there are not known defects,” Ammons said.

GMA Investigates wondered: what are used car dealers saying about the cars for sale on their lots with potentially dangerous airbags?

While automakers are required by law to notify their new car dealers and the car’s registered owner about any recalls at the time they are issued, there is currently no federal law stopping car dealers from selling cars with open recalls, or requiring used car dealers to check for them.

So ABC News producer Gerry Wagschal went undercover into nine used car lots in New York, New Jersey, and Alabama, to see what salespeople would say when we asked them about specific cars that we knew had open airbag recalls.

Of the nine dealers ABC News went to, five told our producer they didn’t know if there was an airbag recall on the car, while four dealers told our producer there was no such recall.

During our investigation, only one car dealer, in Mobile, Alabama checked for a recall on the spot. The salesman told our producer that he would Google the car’s VIN (vehicle identification number) and search for a recall. He didn’t find any information, so he then called a Honda dealer and discovered a recall on the car’s airbag.

Other dealerships told our producer that there was no airbag recalls on the vehicles we identified.

“It doesn’t have a recall for it,” a saleswoman in Paterson, New Jersey, told our producer. “No, no that I know of.”

When asked again whether there was a recall on the airbag, she replied no.

A manager at the Paterson location later told ABC News, “Usually if there is an open recall the vehicle manufacturer has to notify us and they didn’t notify us in this case…We usually don’t check the VIN in a database. In certain cases we call the dealer.”

ABC News also went to a car dealership in Hawthorne, New Jersey, to inquire about a vehicle with an open recall.

“That has zero recalls,” a salesman there told our producer.

Later the salesman told ABC News, “We didn’t get any recall notice. All cars are titled in my name. If there’s a recall on a vehicle it won’t go out the door without first checking. I get recall letters. I didn’t get a letter. I do not have a letter on that recall. Before you would have bought the vehicle I would have run a carfax and if there was a recall it would not have gone out before it was fixed. I have a Cobalt right now with a recall that is getting fixed right now at the dealer.”

Auction Direct Auto Sales in Jersey City, New Jersey, also told our producer there was no airbag recall on a vehicle. But, in fact, there was a recall, and it was one of four cars at that dealership under recall for the potentially dangerous airbags.

Later ABC News’ Gio Benitez made a return visit to the car lot.

“So listen, you told Gerry that this didn’t have a recall, but it does,” Benitez told the salesman, Roberto Tanco.

“It does?” Tanco asked.

But Roberto told ABC News it’s not his fault, it’s the manufacturer’s. And although he feels responsible for the cars he sells, he said the automaker should have sent a recall letter.

“We need somebody to let us know and that person is the company, the manufacturer,” Tanco said.

The problem is recall notices are sent at the time of the recall to the registered owner and the carmaker’s new car dealers, but sometimes never again. Also, not all used car dealers are required to register their cars. If the used car dealer did not register the car, they would not receive a recall notice.

The owner of Auction Direct Auto Sales told GMA Investigates that he hadn’t registered the SUV our producer inquired about and that, “We are not required by law to check for recalls. We don’t have time to check for open recalls.”

Even so, Tanco told ABC News that he will start checking online for recalls, and wrote down the government website to do so — www.safercar.gov — right in front our cameras.

The government agency, NHTSA runs that site and tells GMA Investigates the Department of Transportation has proposed a law that would make it illegal for used car dealers to sell cars with open recalls without fixing them.

Our ABC News investigation concluded that in many cases, it’s up to the consumer to check for open recalls before purchasing a used vehicle.

The site CARFAX, which is used by millions of consumers each year searching for vehicle history information, offers a free service at www.mycarfax.com that monitors cars for recalls. The service is also available through an application on Apple and Android devices.

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Copyright 2014 ABC News Radio

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JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images(JERUSALEM) — At least four people were killed and a dozen others wounded inside a synagogue complex in West Jerusalem Tuesday by two men carrying guns, knives and axes.

Israeli police responding to the assault in the ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighborhood shot both attackers dead.

Although Hamas did not claim direct responsibility for the attack, the militant group said it was likely the result of last month’s closing of East Jerusalem’s Al-Aqsa mosque as well as the mysterious circumstances surrounding Monday’s hanging death of a Palestinian bus driver.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu put the blame on Hamas and President Mahmoud Abbas of the Palestinian Authority, claiming they incited the attackers with fiery rhetoric. Netanyahu vowed, “We will respond decisively to the horrific murder of Jews who came to pray and were killed by despicable murderers.”

In recent weeks, there have been several assaults targeting Israeli civilians in Jerusalem, the West Bank and Tel Aviv, leaving at least three dead.

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JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images(JERUSALEM) — At least four people were killed and a dozen others wounded inside a synagogue complex in West Jerusalem Tuesday by two men carrying guns, knives and axes.

Israeli police responding to the assault in the ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighborhood shot both attackers dead.

Although Hamas did not claim direct responsibility for the attack, the militant group said it was likely the result of last month’s closing of East Jerusalem’s Al-Aqsa mosque as well as the mysterious circumstances surrounding Monday’s hanging death of a Palestinian bus driver.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu put the blame on Hamas and President Mahmoud Abbas of the Palestinian Authority, claiming they incited the attackers with fiery rhetoric. Netanyahu vowed, “We will respond decisively to the horrific murder of Jews who came to pray and were killed by despicable murderers.”

In recent weeks, there have been several assaults targeting Israeli civilians in Jerusalem, the West Bank and Tel Aviv, leaving at least three dead.

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — The family of Peter Kassig, the American aid worker killed by ISIS, said Monday that their “hearts are battered” and that they now need time to “mourn, cry — and yes, forgive — and begin to heal.”

“Our hearts are battered, but they will mend. The world is broken, but it will be healed in the end. And good will prevail as the One God of many names will prevail,” his mother, Paula Kassig, said at a news conference at Epworth United Methodist Church in Indianapolis.

Kassig’s father, Ed, added, “Please pray for Abdul-Rahman, or Pete if that is how you knew him, at sunset this evening. Pray also for all people held against their will in Syria, Iraq, and around the world. Lastly, please allow our family the time and privacy to mourn, cry — and yes, forgive — and begin to heal.”

Kassig, the fifth Western hostage ISIS has claimed to have killed since August, changed his name to Abdul-Rahman after converting to Islam, according to his parents. The aid worker and former Army Ranger was abducted in October 2013 while traveling to a town in eastern Syria.

Kassig’s parents had issued a statement on Sunday night asking that their son be remembered for what he did with his life, not how it was ended.

“We are heartbroken to learn that our son, Abdul-Rahman Peter Kassig, has lost his life as a result of his love for the Syrian people and his desire to ease their suffering,” they wrote. “Our heart also goes out to the families of the Syrians who lost their lives, along with our son.”

Towards the end of the nearly 16-minute video, a militant stands over a severed head, saying, “This is Peter Edward Kassig, a U.S. citizen, of your country; Peter who fought against the Muslims in Iraq, while serving as a soldier.”

The militant speaks with a British accent and the video identifies his location as Dabiq, a small town in the northern Syrian province of Aleppo, near the Turkish border. This is the first video in which the hostage isn’t seen alive before his apparent murder.

Paula Kassig also said her son’s “life is evidence that he’s been right all along; one person can make a difference.”

The family has asked that contributions in Kassig’s memory be made to the Syrian American Medical Society, which is working to meet the medical needs of displaced Syrians.

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Stockbyte/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The kickoff to the holiday season is almost here, and for working mothers, with the spirit of the season comes major stress.

It’s a two-month period Teresa Taylor, Fortune 200 executive and author of the book The Balance Myth: Rethinking Work-Life Success, calls the “holiday meltdown.” It starts, she said, with trying to find the perfect Halloween costume and goes downhill from there.

It’s the “season of school plays, to brine or not to brine the ‘perfect’ turkey to gift wrap, ribbons and bows. Oh, and I work full-time. I fail to keep it together when the simultaneous pressures of fourth-quarter, end-of-fiscal-year work and holiday pressures collide,” Taylor said.

Not to mention the financial stress the holidays put on the family budget, plus the inevitable pressure the close of the fourth quarter puts on so many working moms.

Taylor offers the following five tips for working moms to keep it together during the hectic holidays:

1. Wear the game face. Don’t be a Scrooge…it is not necessary to let everyone know how miserable you are. It is not productive and only creates more chaos. It is OK to cry, but find a place where you can cry alone – mine was the women’s bathroom in my office.

2. Elementary school only comes once. Each school grade comes with unique characteristics that shape your children. Try to rise above the details and look at the bigger picture. Don’t let your pressures stress out your children. They might think it’s their fault. Treasure – don’t dread — this busy holiday-at-school time.

3. Manage your time more efficiently. Be present in what you’re doing, finish it and move on. I have my list of things to do, and I’ll assign time slots to it. If I have one hour to work on a presentation at work or one hour to wrap presents, I do the best I can for that one hour.

4. Combine your work and family schedules. I used to keep two different calendars – one for home and one for work; but, I was missing work deadlines, my kids’ activities and other events. So I combined the calendars, which caused me to start talking about my family at work and integrating my two lives. It’s one life and one calendar! And, now, I don’t miss a thing. More than ever, the holidays are the right time for combining.

5. Stay in the moment. When you’re at work or in a meeting, be there. When you’re at home, be there. If you’re in a business meeting, don’t be wishing to be somewhere else. Be present where you are, and don’t feel guilty about where you’re not. If I’m at a holiday play, I put down my phone and take it all in, and recall why we partake in the rat race—for our children.

At the end of the day – or at least every time the holidays came around – all over again, I learned a valuable lesson about adversity, setbacks, disappointment, difficulties and everything else that came rolling down the pike. It takes faith that things will work out, and they always do.

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Channel Nine Australia(NEW YORK) — An Australian TV anchor wore the same suit every day for a year on camera — yet none of his viewers noticed.

Karl Stefanovic told Fairfax News Media in Australia that he donned the same blue Burberry knockoff day in and day out on Channel Nine’s Today program to illustrate the double standard dealt against his female colleagues, who are regularly criticized for their fashion choices.

And apparently his experiment proved his point.

“I’m judged on my interviews, my appalling sense of humor – on how I do my job, basically,” he told Fairfax. “Whereas women are quite often judged on what they’re wearing or how their hair is.”

Only two other colleagues knew about Stefanovic’s ruse, telling him from time to time that the suit was “getting a bit stinky.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Gas prices dropped around the country in the last week, with the average gallon coming in at just under $2.90, down almost five cents from last week.

The cheapest gas is in the Gulf Coast region, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said, where a gallon costs just $2.67. Meanwhile, gas on the West Coast costs $3.11 per gallon.

California remains the most expensive state in which to buy gas, at $3.15 per gallon.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — A senior administration official said on Monday that while an agreement in the Iran nuclear talks is “difficult but possible,” it remains unclear whether a deal will be accomplished by next week’s deadline.

Talks are scheduled in Vienna this week, with U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry making the trip. Despite the concern that a deal may not come easily, the official said on a Monday conference call that an “extension is not and has not been a subject of negotiations at this point.”

“I think we will not know how far we’re going to get and whether we can get to a comprehensive agreement, a joint comprehensive plan of action, until we get to the 24th of November,” the official added.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has expressed deep concerns about Iran’s nuclear capabilities. The official, however, said that any deal President Obama signs off on will be “a good one.” He added that the president will act in the interests of the U.S., Israel, and partners around the world.

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