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ABC “The View”The View host Whoopi Goldberg has been among the staunchest supporters of Bill Cosby in the face of allegations by dozens of women that he sexually assaulted them, even after a court document released last week revealed Cosby had admitted to procuring drugs for use in having sex with women. Now it appears even Goldberg is being swayed by the evidence and allegations.

On Tuesday’s episode of The View, Goldberg said that “all of the information that’s out there kind of points to guilt.”

Goldberg’s comments came during a segment featuring ABC News legal analyst Dan Abrams, who explained in answer to Goldberg’s questions that most all of Cosby’s accusers had no legal criminal or civil recourse, because the statute of limitations in most stages had expired — even though, Abrams said, “It’s impossible to ignore the consistency of these stories.”

“I can’t say any more ‘innocent until proven guilty,’ can’t say that anymore,” Goldberg said, “because there’s no way to prove it.” Goldberg also urged viewers to lobby state representatives to change statutes of limitations for rape cases.

“What we’ve learned is there’s no recourse for these women except what they’re doing,” Goldberg ultimately declared. “If this is to be tried in the court of public opinion, I’ve gotta say, all of the information that’s out there kinda points to guilt.”

Cosby has never been criminally charged in connection with the allegations of dozens of women who say he drugged and sexually abused them. Representatives for Cosby have denied the allegations.

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Courtesy Shane Ortega(WAHIAWA, Hawaii) — News that the Department of Defense is planning to lift a ban on transgender military members has Sgt. Shane Ortega “pumped” about the future.

A helicopter crew chief, Ortega has spent 10 years in the military. For half that time he has lived as a transgender man.

Ortega, 28, lives openly as a transgender man, but under current military rules he still must be addressed as a female officer and wear the uniform for a female crew member. For Ortega, who has participated in bodybuilding competitions, only the largest size can accommodate his biceps and neck.

“I look ridiculous,” Ortega told ABC News. “The biggest is a size 20. It only fits my arms.”

Ortega, based at Wheeler Army Airfield in Hawaii, said he’s hoping the announcement on Monday by Secretary of Defense Ash Carter will mean he can soon wear a man’s uniform or unisex uniform while serving. Carter said he has ordered the creation of a working group that will begin the process of ending the ban on transgender persons from serving openly in the U.S. military.

“Throughout this time, transgender men and women in uniform have been there with us, even as they often had to serve in silence alongside their fellow comrades in arms,” Carter said in a statement. “The Defense Department’s current regulations regarding transgender service members are outdated and are causing uncertainty that distracts commanders from our core missions.”

There are approximately 15,000 transgender members of the U.S. military, according to the National Center for Transgender Equality.

“The Pentagon’s rickety system of discrimination against us is falling apart,” the group’s executive director, Mara Keisling, said in a statement. “It is in everyone’s interest that the 15,000 or so currently serving trans people be allowed to serve openly and honorably.”

As a transgender member of the military, Ortega has publicly advocated for lifting the ban and already has ideas about how the military can troubleshoot any growing pains. He hopes officials introduce new documentation that allows service members to more easily identify genders and a designated LGBT and minority liaison for every major command.

“I’m pumped up,” he said. “At the same time I know this is a small step forward and there’s so much more to do.”

Ortega has also been mentoring others who either want to join the military but are afraid or current service members who keep their identified gender a secret in order to fit in. He said he personally knows of a transgender woman who has been afraid to transition publicly while serving in an all-male unit.

“It’s a human rights, health care issue,” Ortega said of the mental toll on a soldier unable to transition. “I talk to her three to four times a month.”

Laura Jacobs, a therapist who specializes in working with transgender people, said she has multiple clients who wish to join the military but fear they will be unable to publicly identify with their true gender. She said one client was debating whether to enter the military as a male, even though she identifies as a female.

“Her family has been in the military and she’s very drawn to guns and defense,” Jacobs said. “She’s trying to decide if she should transition or if she should hold off. … She feels like she’s putting aside her identity.”

Ortega himself said he didn’t really second-guess his decision to be public about transitioning in 2010 when he started the process.

“I knew that I was a good performer,” Ortega said, speaking about his military performance. “I could balance the risk [and] reward.”

He said he’s taken hormones and had partial surgery, and that he’s now able to get along with the other soldiers in his command.

“I take care of soldiers in my unit. I haven’t had any friction with anyone,” Ortega said. “I do have an A-type personality. I [try to] operate as a quiet professional. … Your actions speak for themselves.”

With no announcements expected for six months as a Department of Defense working group studies the issue, Ortega is hoping that the Pentagon not only officially lifts the ban but works with transgender advocates to help integrate and support transgender military members.

He’s also hoping that he can soon wear a uniform that fits him properly.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Courtesy Shane Ortega(WAHIAWA, Hawaii) — News that the Department of Defense is planning to lift a ban on transgender military members has Sgt. Shane Ortega “pumped” about the future.

A helicopter crew chief, Ortega has spent 10 years in the military. For half that time he has lived as a transgender man.

Ortega, 28, lives openly as a transgender man, but under current military rules he still must be addressed as a female officer and wear the uniform for a female crew member. For Ortega, who has participated in bodybuilding competitions, only the largest size can accommodate his biceps and neck.

“I look ridiculous,” Ortega told ABC News. “The biggest is a size 20. It only fits my arms.”

Ortega, based at Wheeler Army Airfield in Hawaii, said he’s hoping the announcement on Monday by Secretary of Defense Ash Carter will mean he can soon wear a man’s uniform or unisex uniform while serving. Carter said he has ordered the creation of a working group that will begin the process of ending the ban on transgender persons from serving openly in the U.S. military.

“Throughout this time, transgender men and women in uniform have been there with us, even as they often had to serve in silence alongside their fellow comrades in arms,” Carter said in a statement. “The Defense Department’s current regulations regarding transgender service members are outdated and are causing uncertainty that distracts commanders from our core missions.”

There are approximately 15,000 transgender members of the U.S. military, according to the National Center for Transgender Equality.

“The Pentagon’s rickety system of discrimination against us is falling apart,” the group’s executive director, Mara Keisling, said in a statement. “It is in everyone’s interest that the 15,000 or so currently serving trans people be allowed to serve openly and honorably.”

As a transgender member of the military, Ortega has publicly advocated for lifting the ban and already has ideas about how the military can troubleshoot any growing pains. He hopes officials introduce new documentation that allows service members to more easily identify genders and a designated LGBT and minority liaison for every major command.

“I’m pumped up,” he said. “At the same time I know this is a small step forward and there’s so much more to do.”

Ortega has also been mentoring others who either want to join the military but are afraid or current service members who keep their identified gender a secret in order to fit in. He said he personally knows of a transgender woman who has been afraid to transition publicly while serving in an all-male unit.

“It’s a human rights, health care issue,” Ortega said of the mental toll on a soldier unable to transition. “I talk to her three to four times a month.”

Laura Jacobs, a therapist who specializes in working with transgender people, said she has multiple clients who wish to join the military but fear they will be unable to publicly identify with their true gender. She said one client was debating whether to enter the military as a male, even though she identifies as a female.

“Her family has been in the military and she’s very drawn to guns and defense,” Jacobs said. “She’s trying to decide if she should transition or if she should hold off. … She feels like she’s putting aside her identity.”

Ortega himself said he didn’t really second-guess his decision to be public about transitioning in 2010 when he started the process.

“I knew that I was a good performer,” Ortega said, speaking about his military performance. “I could balance the risk [and] reward.”

He said he’s taken hormones and had partial surgery, and that he’s now able to get along with the other soldiers in his command.

“I take care of soldiers in my unit. I haven’t had any friction with anyone,” Ortega said. “I do have an A-type personality. I [try to] operate as a quiet professional. … Your actions speak for themselves.”

With no announcements expected for six months as a Department of Defense working group studies the issue, Ortega is hoping that the Pentagon not only officially lifts the ban but works with transgender advocates to help integrate and support transgender military members.

He’s also hoping that he can soon wear a uniform that fits him properly.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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ABC “The View”The View host Whoopi Goldberg has been among the staunchest supporters of Bill Cosby in the face of allegations by dozens of women that he sexually assaulted them, even after a court document released last week revealed Cosby had admitted to procuring drugs for use in having sex with women. Now it appears even Goldberg is being swayed by the evidence and allegations.

On Tuesday’s episode of The View, Goldberg said that “all of the information that’s out there kind of points to guilt.”

Goldberg’s comments came during a segment featuring ABC News legal analyst Dan Abrams, who explained in answer to Goldberg’s questions that most all of Cosby’s accusers had no legal criminal or civil recourse, because the statute of limitations in most stages had expired — even though, Abrams said, “It’s impossible to ignore the consistency of these stories.”

“I can’t say any more ‘innocent until proven guilty,’ can’t say that anymore,” Goldberg said, “because there’s no way to prove it.” Goldberg also urged viewers to lobby state representatives to change statutes of limitations for rape cases.

“What we’ve learned is there’s no recourse for these women except what they’re doing,” Goldberg ultimately declared. “If this is to be tried in the court of public opinion, I’ve gotta say, all of the information that’s out there kinda points to guilt.”

Cosby has never been criminally charged in connection with the allegations of dozens of women who say he drugged and sexually abused them. Representatives for Cosby have denied the allegations.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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ABC News(TEHRAN, Iran) — The world is captivated by Iran’s tentative deal to halt its nuclear program, but none may be more engrossed in the nation’s future than its own people.

After more than 20 months of deliberations, Iran and six world powers reached a tentative agreement early Tuesday to curb the country’s nuclear program in exchange for lifting some economic sanctions.

Iranians watched President Obama in his early-morning remarks that were carried on Iranian state television in a rare move he hopes will open relations with Iran. Citizens followed the news online and on their smartphones.

Once global authorities verify that Iran is keeping its promise to dismantle much of its nuclear program, major economic sanctions, such as trade embargoes, will be lifted.

The move is expected to release more than $100 billion in frozen Iranian assets and increase the global oil supply.

ABC’s Chief Global Affairs Correspondent Martha Raddatz, the only western reporter in Iran the day the historic agreement was announced, spent the day outside the former American Embassy to get reaction from Iranians on the tentative deal.

Watch the full ABC News digital report below.

ABC US News | World News

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Victor Emond/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is investigating another manufacturer because of reported ruptures of air bag inflators.

NHTSA said that ARC Automotive Inc. made air bag inflators in older models of Fiat Chrysler and Kia vehicles that could potentially malfunction. The affected population consists of 470,000 2002 Chrysler Town and Country minivans and another 70,000 2004 Kia Optima sedans.

NHTSA became aware of the 2009 incident last year and aware of the second incident in June. The first incident in 2009 was in a 2002 Chrysler Town and Country minivan in the driver-side inflator, and the second incident involved a 2004 Kia Optima.

“While the first incident appears to be attributable to a blockage of the exhaust vents in the inflator, the cause of the second event is unknown,” a NHTSA spokesperson told ABC News in a statement. “Given the potential for injury and the safety-critical nature of air bags, NHTSA has opened this investigation to collect all the relevant data and determine the appropriate steps for safety.”

There are two known injuries related to the incidents, but no known fatalities, NHTSA said in documents made public on Tuesday.

NHTSA made the decision on Friday to open an investigation into the matter.]

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Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — While they haven’t yet received the full nuclear deal for review, Republican leaders condemned the administration’s agreement with Iran on Tuesday as dangerous and said it fell short of thwarting Iran’s nuclear ambitions.

“This appears to fall well short of what the goal we all thought was trying to be achieved, which was that Iran would not be a nuclear state,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-KY, said.

Sen. John McCain, R-AZ, who plans to hold hearings on the deal as chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said he’s concerned by the lifting of sanctions targeting Iranian leaders such as Qasem Soleimani.

“There is no addressing, in this agreement that we’ve seen, that addresses Iran’s role as a chief sponsor of terror,” he said.

“I predicted that in their desperation that the president and John Kerry would make a bad deal. It looks very much like they made a worse deal than even we had feared,” McCain added.

McCain and Sen. Bob Corker, R-TN, the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said they plan to hold hearings over the next few weeks ahead of a resolution vote in early September after August recess.

“Right now, based on our staff going through the agreement for a couple of hours … I would say the agreement has taken a downward trend,” Corker said. “We’re going to have a thoughtful, deliberate process,” he said of the review.

As for the Republican resolution strategy, McConnell said he expected President Obama to lobby Congress and “work hard to get his 34 votes” to protect his veto of a resolution of disapproval.

Corker said on Tuesday the 60 day countdown wouldn’t start until Congress have received the entire agreement, which is expected to happen in the next couple of days. He expects Republicans to hold hearings on the agreement through July and eventually vote on a resolution in September, after recess.

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ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — There will be significant sanctions relief for the leader of the Quds force, a special unit of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard accused of supplying militants with weapons to kill Americans during the Iraq war, under the new Iran nuclear deal.

Gen. Qasem Soleimani will have his travel ban lifted and foreign assets unfrozen — sanctions imposed by the UN — if the deal goes as planned.

It was not immediately clear where he would be allowed to travel or which assets would be unfrozen under the deal.

The accord reached Tuesday says that all United Nations Security Council resolutions against Iran will have to be lifted as part of the sanctions relief package.

A senior State Department official, who spoke to ABC News on the condition of anonymity, said the terms for Soleimani were agreed upon in November 2013 and conceded it was a necessary to bring the Iranians to the negotiating table.

The official also pointed out that Soleimani won’t receive the sanctions relief for another eight years and that all existing U.S. sanctions on Soleimani will stay in place.

In 2011, the Treasury Department prohibited anyone in the U.S. from doing business with him as a result of a plot to assassinate the Saudi Ambassador to the U.S.

His assets in the U.S. were also frozen.

Soleimani is known for joining forces with the Iraqis to fight ISIS, an enemy it shares with the United States. Soleimani leads the teams of advisers supporting the Shia militias in their offensive against the Sunni dominated terror group.

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Dept of Justice(BOSTON) — The estranged son of a Boston police captain arrested on terrorism-related charges on July 4 appeared in a Massachusetts court Tuesday for a dramatic detention hearing.

Prosecutors laid out publicly some of the evidence against 23-year-old Alexander Ciccolo, including portions of a videotaped interview law enforcement officers had conducted with him after Ciccolo was arrested.

In the video, Ciccolo says that ISIS is a “good thing,” that the terrorist group is freeing people from oppression and that “nonbelievers have to pay.” He dismissed the dozens of gruesome taped ISIS executions by saying those suffering in ISIS videos are “criminals.”

At the end of Tuesday’s hearing, the judge determined Ciccolo could be a threat to the public if released and ordered him be detained until trial.

Ciccolo’s July 4 arrest, which officials said was part of a counter-terrorism operation against alleged ISIS-inspired domestic terrorists, was a based in part on the actions of Ciccolo’s father, Capt. Robert Ciccolo, as ABC News reported Monday.

Law enforcement officials said Capt. Ciccolo alerted counter-terrorism authorities about a year ago that his son, with whom he had had minimal contact for several years, “was going off the deep end” and “spouting extremist jihadist sympathies.”

According to court documents, an “acquaintance” of Alexander Ciccolo — identified by officials to ABC News as Capt. Ciccolo — became alarmed last fall when he received disturbing text messages from his son, who has a “long history of mental illness” and has been estranged from his father for several years.

In one, the younger Ciccolo called America “Satan” and in another he called Americans “disgusting,” according to a affidavit filed by FBI Special Agent Jeffrey Lawrence. The agent also said that Ciccolo told his father and stepmother he was “not afraid to die” for radical Islam and that is his “faith is under attack.”

Ciccolo planned to attack a college campus, possibly with a pressure cooker bomb, and then live stream the execution of students online, according to court documents. He was arrested July 4 shortly after allegedly purchasing four firearms, including two high-powered rifles, from an undercover FBI informant and charged with illegal possession.

Monday Ciccolo’s family put out a statement saying they were “saddened and disappointed to learn of our son’s intentions, [but] grateful that authorities were able to prevent any loss of life or harm to others.”

Brad Garrett, a former FBI agent and ABC News consultant, said Capt. Ciccolo’s decision to alert authorities to his son must have been an “excruciating” one.

“It’s a natural reaction for any parent to feel devastated and disappointed for their children to want to do harm to others,” Garrett said. “I think it was probably excruciating for [Capt. Ciccolo] to come forward. It took a lot of courage, and it was a good thing he did.”

Neighbors told ABC News the younger Ciccolo was a recent convert to Islam, and the FBI said he was influenced by extremist material online. He had purportedly taken the Arabic name Abu Ali al-Amriki.

Prior to allegedly becoming an ISIS sympathizer, Ciccolo was photographed attending an anti-nuclear “peace walk” in 2012.

Jun Yasuda, a Buddhist who walked with Ciccolo in July 2012, told ABC News Ciccolo appeared to be “concerned about peace… and understood about non-violent protest.”

“We walked together after Fukushima, and he realized that he had an open mind and that people were wonderful,” Yasuda said.

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Jazz Jennings, 14, and her family are sharing their story on a new TLC series called, “I Am Jazz.” (ABC News)(NEW YORK) — Like many teenage girls her age, Jazz Jennings spent time at the beach this summer and loves playing soccer with her friends, but she’s about to face a new challenge when she starts high school in the fall.

“I’m a little bit worried because I’m not sure if people are going to be fully accepting,” she said. “I’ve noticed that boys are less accepting than girls.”

Jazz is transgender, and at just 14 years old, she is staving off puberty and medically transitioning her body to female, the gender she identifies as, by taking estrogen and puberty blockers. All the while, like her peers, Jazz is trying to navigate typical teenage issues.

“It’s hard for me to talk about boys with my friends sometimes,” Jazz said. “All they have to do is stuck their butt out and then a boy’s like, ‘Text me.’ For me, it’s not like that.”

Jazz’s family, whose legal last name is not Jennings, has been sharing its story publicly for nearly a decade, beginning with Jazz’s landmark interview with ABC’s Barbara Walters in 2007, when she was just 6 years old.

In the years since, Jazz has bravely remained in the spotlight, speaking publicly on transgender issues, and she co-authored a book entitled I Am Jazz.

Now Jazz and her family have decided to let cameras into their lives once again, this time on a new TLC series called, I Am Jazz.

“I just want to be as open as I can,” Jazz said. “It will show other people that being transgender … is OK, it’s not something negative at all. It’s something that I embrace, that my family embraces, and we just live our life, we face the challenges, we conquer them and we move on.”

While some would consider taking hormones to stave off puberty as a controversial move, Jazz’s parents insist it’s essential to her wellbeing.

“I feel that it was the right decision to make,” said her mother Jeanette Jennings. “Even though you’re worried about, it, what would be the consequences if she didn’t … we didn’t want a child that was going through life just hating herself.”

Jazz was assigned “male” at birth, but her mother said from the moment she could express herself, “she acted like a girl.”

“She liked anything sparkly, sparkly and pink,” Jeanette Jennings said. “And she’s so feminine.”

“Early on, we thought it was phase,” Jazz’s father Greg Jennings added. “Even though she was gravitating towards these things, we didn’t really think that much of it initially.”

When Jazz was 3, she was diagnosed with what is now called gender dysphoria.

“I was dumbfounded,” Greg said. “I didn’t know that a child could have issues like this. I never heard of it before.”

Jazz’s parents decided to let her live as a girl. Her fifth birthday party was Jazz’s public “coming out.”

“I got to wear the sparkly bathing suit for my party, I was a girl,” she said. “I was just … it’s happiness.”

As Jazz grew older, her parents said Jazz would have nightmares about puberty and how her body would change.

“She always said, ‘You’re not going to let me have a beard and a mustache,’ and I’m like, ‘Don’t worry, we’ll do what we have to do when the time comes,’” Jeanette said.

When Jazz was 11, the Jennings decided it was time to medically intervene and she had an implant placed in her arm that blocks testosterone production. In addition, Jazz takes a daily estrogen pill that helps her develop as the female she identifies as.

According to the Center for Transyouth Health and Development at Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles, the largest transgender youth clinic in the United States, letting transgender children go through the puberty of their assigned gender at birth can be a deeply traumatic experience and may even lead to higher rates of depression and suicide attempts among transgender teens.

“Young people who experience puberty of their assigned sex at birth that is discordant from their internal gender,” said Dr. Johanna Olson, the medical director for the Center for Transyouth Health and Development. “We see … really high rates of thinking about suicide, of attempting suicide, and alarming rates of depression. We’re talking about rates that are five to six times higher than the youth population in general, in the United States.”

For those children diagnosed with gender dysphoria, according to the center, remittance after age 12 is almost non-existent in its clinical experience. Jazz’s parents say they don’t worry about Jazz remitting.

“Jazz has been insistent, consistent and persistent,” Greg said. “Every now and then we’ll check in, but it’s always the same.”

Managing Jazz’s hormones is a delicate balance and she routinely checks in with her doctor, but Jazz says the medical aspect is just one part of her journey.

“Being transgender is more than just medical books and everything, procedures,” she said. “It’s something spiritual in which you’re finding yourself and really discovering who you are and learning to love yourself.”

And when it comes to boys, Jazz’s older siblings Ari, Griffen and Sander have strong feelings about the possibility of her dating.

“If she ever does end up dating, I really hope she tells the person she’s transgender and they completely are like, ‘I totally accept that,’” said Jazz’s older sister Ari. “So at least she will go through a relationship and get hurt the right way and not the wrong way because someone is transphobic.”

Jazz’s family says they have no regrets about sharing her story, and her journey is still unfolding.

“In the end, everyone just deserves the right to be their authentic selves, just be who they are,” Jazz said. “And I hope we can come to that place one day.”

Watch the full story on “Nightline” Wednesday at 12:35 a.m. ET

ABC US News | World News

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