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Noel Vasquez/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Comedian Bob Saget will hold his Cool Comedy Hot Cuisine to benefit the Scleroderma research foundation at Caroline’s comedy club in New York City on Tuesday.

Also appearing at the benefit will be The View’s Whoopi Goldberg, who will help conduct a silent auction. Comedian George Lopez will perform, along with other surprise guests.

The charity event began in 1988 and features gourmet cuisine and world class comedy. It has so far raised about $30 million for research.

Scleroderma, which affects mostly women in the prime of their lives, claimed the life of the former Full House star’s sister. She was diagnosed with the disease when she was 43 and died at the age of 47. One of the most visible signs is hardening of the skin.

The last Cool Comedy Hot Cuisine event was held in June at the House of Blues in Las Vegas. It raised nearly $300,000 for Scleroderma research. It featured Saget, auction co-host Bill Bellamy, comedian Jay Leno and special musical guest Ben Folds.

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office.microsoft.com(NEW YORK) — Clip Art, the iconic collection of images beloved by students and professionals around the world for their whimsy and ease of inserting into Microsoft Word and PowerPoint, has been laid to rest.

Microsoft announced in a blog post Monday that it is shuttering its Clip Art library in favor of Bing Images, where users can now download royalty free images to use in their projects.

“Usage of Office’s image library has been declining year-to-year as customers rely more on search engines,” a Microsoft Office blog post said announcing the death of the characters that were used in schools and offices around the world in the 1990s and early 2000s.

Microsoft said Bing Images will provide “higher quality images that are more up-to-date,” citing the example of a what Clip Art cellphones look like compared to more modern images.

The process for using Bing Images will be the same as Clip Art. For Microsoft Office 2013, users can click “insert” and then select “online pictures.” In older versions of the program, “insert” and “clip art” will do the trick.

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Bob Levey/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Adrian Peterson is fighting back against his indefinite suspension from the National Football League for disciplining his 4-year-old son by hitting the boy with a switch.

The Minnesota Vikings running back pleaded no contest to misdemeanor reckless assault last month and will face no jail time, but the NFL took a harder line when it came to his punishment.

The NFL suspended Peterson for the rest of this season, but Peterson is in New York Tuesday to appeal the suspension.

Peterson’s team is hoping that the NFL’s decision to overturn their indefinite suspension against Ray Rice, the Baltimore Ravens star who was suspended indefinitely for hitting his wife in an elevator, is an indicator that Peterson has a chance of getting his decision reversed.

There are some major differences in the two cases, however.

The first is that Rice was given an initial punishment of a two-game suspension and he had served that. The NFL later added a more drastic punishment of indefinite suspension pertaining to the same incident. An arbitrator threw out the second and more severe punishment by declaring it was a form of double jeopardy and Rice had not misled the NFL with his initial statements about the incident.

That type of double jeopardy situation is not true in Peterson’s case because his suspension was the first and only punishment he received from the league.

While Rice faced a former federal judge with no NFL affiliation, Peterson is making his appeal case to Judge Harold Henderson, a longtime counsel to the NFL.

Peterson’s camp believes he was given certain assurances about his punishment by a league official. USA Today reported that Peterson allegedly has taped conversations with an NFL executive who said that Peterson could only be suspended for two games.

The alleged conversation between Peterson and NFL executive vice president of football operations Troy Vincent could play a major role in the appeal hearing.

The appeal will be held behind closed-doors and it is unclear how long it will last.

Rice and Peterson are not the only star football players facing punishment for domestic assault incidents. Florida State University quarterback Jameis Winston’s long-delayed code of conduct hearing is scheduled to begin on Tuesday, almost two years after he allegedly sexually assaulted a female student.

Tuesday’s hearing comes as the season is winding down, though FSU will face Georgia Tech on Saturday and the team could also end up playing in a playoff game as well.

Winston had claimed he is innocent and he was cleared of criminal charges earlier this year.

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Bob Levey/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Adrian Peterson is fighting back against his indefinite suspension from the National Football League for disciplining his 4-year-old son by hitting the boy with a switch.

The Minnesota Vikings running back pleaded no contest to misdemeanor reckless assault last month and will face no jail time, but the NFL took a harder line when it came to his punishment.

The NFL suspended Peterson for the rest of this season, but Peterson is in New York Tuesday to appeal the suspension.

Peterson’s team is hoping that the NFL’s decision to overturn their indefinite suspension against Ray Rice, the Baltimore Ravens star who was suspended indefinitely for hitting his wife in an elevator, is an indicator that Peterson has a chance of getting his decision reversed.

There are some major differences in the two cases, however.

The first is that Rice was given an initial punishment of a two-game suspension and he had served that. The NFL later added a more drastic punishment of indefinite suspension pertaining to the same incident. An arbitrator threw out the second and more severe punishment by declaring it was a form of double jeopardy and Rice had not misled the NFL with his initial statements about the incident.

That type of double jeopardy situation is not true in Peterson’s case because his suspension was the first and only punishment he received from the league.

While Rice faced a former federal judge with no NFL affiliation, Peterson is making his appeal case to Judge Harold Henderson, a longtime counsel to the NFL.

Peterson’s camp believes he was given certain assurances about his punishment by a league official. USA Today reported that Peterson allegedly has taped conversations with an NFL executive who said that Peterson could only be suspended for two games.

The alleged conversation between Peterson and NFL executive vice president of football operations Troy Vincent could play a major role in the appeal hearing.

The appeal will be held behind closed-doors and it is unclear how long it will last.

Rice and Peterson are not the only star football players facing punishment for domestic assault incidents. Florida State University quarterback Jameis Winston’s long-delayed code of conduct hearing is scheduled to begin on Tuesday, almost two years after he allegedly sexually assaulted a female student.

Tuesday’s hearing comes as the season is winding down, though FSU will face Georgia Tech on Saturday and the team could also end up playing in a playoff game as well.

Winston had claimed he is innocent and he was cleared of criminal charges earlier this year.

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Fuse/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — If you happened to miss the sales event of the year on Black Friday, don’t worry because we are now entering cyber week.

“These stores are going to have week-long Cyber Monday sales so if you don’t get your deal today, check back again tomorrow,” Mark LoCastro of Dealnews.com told ABC News.

Take a look at the deals you can still grab online:

Amazon

Amazon is rolling out new deals for the next eight days.

Walmart

Walmart is promoting 500 new sale items this week, like this:

Target

Target has their cyber week running through December 6 with promotions like this:

Home Depot

Home Depot has another seven days of deals including big ticket appliances.

Aeropostale

Aeropostale is offering 20% off its entire site through the end of Tuesday.

Kmart

Kmart has 25% off when you spend $125 until Saturday.

Carter’s

Carter’s is 25% off if you buy $50 worth through Wednesday.

And for those of you that did shop over the holiday weekend, you might be a little concerned that the thing you bought on sale could actually get an even bigger discount.

Good news — there is an app to check that.

Slice app tracks your purchases and if there’s a price drop, it alerts you. Most stores have a price drop refund policy if you act fast.

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Al-Furqan Media/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(BEIRUT) — The wife of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al Baghdadi has been arrested after crossing into Lebanon from Syria with fake documents, Lebanese security and military officials told ABC News.

The woman, whose identity has not been officially revealed, was taken into custody with a child.

Lebanon’s As-Safir newspaper, which first reported the arrest Tuesday, said that the wife has been detained for 10 days and questioned at Lebanon’s Ministry of Defense where “investigations are ongoing.” The newspaper said the arrest was made in conjunction with foreign intelligence services, describing it as “a valuable catch.” It’s not known how many wives Baghdadi has and there are conflicting reports as to the sex of the child.

Al Baghdadi has proclaimed himself the caliph, or ruler of all Muslims, whose group controls a vast area of northern Syria and western Iraq.

The arrest comes as Lebanon grapples with how to deal with the kidnappings of 26 Lebanese soldiers by ISIS and the Syrian al Qaeda-linked group Jabhat al-Nusra. The groups have repeatedly threatened to kill the hostages if militants being held in Lebanon’s Roumieh prison are not released.

On Monday, families of the soldiers — who have been staging a sit-in in downtown Beirut demanding government action — burned tires in response to the latest threat.

Reports that Baghdadi had been killed or wounded in a recent U.S. airstrike were refuted by him in an audio recording last month in which he called on followers to unleash “volcanoes of jihad.”

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Digital Vision/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Gasoline prices across the U.S. continue to fall, which is great for consumers, especially at this time of year.

However, the oil industry and states that pump out the stuff are beginning to worry if prices come down too much more, it will wind up hurting the economy.

Speaking for the Colorado Petroleum Association, Stan Dempsey says capital expenditures are being scaled back because of lower prices for crude and if they fall below $50 a barrel, the next step is laying off workers.

Another one of the ramifications of less money for big oil is lower tax revenues for local governments.

On top of that, environmentalists are concerned that as people fill up their tanks, it just sends more pollution into the air.

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Brown Family / Facebook(WASHINGTON) — Americans divide evenly on last week’s grand jury decision in Ferguson, Missouri – with vast racial, political, and generational gaps defining public attitudes on the volatile issue.

Overall, 48 percent in this ABC News/Washington Post poll approve and 45 percent disapprove of the grand jury’s decision not to bring criminal charges against police officer Darren Wilson, who is white, in the fatal shooting of black teenager Michael Brown last August.

See PDF for full results, charts and tables here.

Underlying divisions are profound. Fifty-eight percent of whites approve of the grand jury action, compared with 9 percent of blacks and 32 percent of Hispanics, the nation’s two main racial and ethnic minorities. Eighty-five percent of blacks and six in 10 Hispanics disapprove.

Indeed, 73 percent of blacks “strongly” disapprove of the decision not to charge Wilson, a remarkable level of strong sentiment on any issue. Forty-five percent of Hispanics also strongly disapprove — while among whites, 42 percent strongly approve of the grand jury’s decision.

There’s also an even split, 48-47 percent, on whether the federal government should bring civil rights charges against Wilson. In this case 85 percent of blacks say they’d approve, as do 67 percent of Hispanics — falling to 38 percent among whites.

This poll, produced for ABC by Langer Research Associates, highlights the stark social divisions in opinions of the case, many of which mirror broader attitudes about the criminal justice system. Views divide sharply not only by race, but also by political party affiliation, ideology and age, among other factors.

Seventy-six percent of Republicans, for example, approve of the grand jury’s decision, while half of political independents and just 27 percent of Democrats agree. Views on civil charges run just as sharply in the opposite direction: Nearly three-quarters of Democrats say they’d approve, dropping to fewer than half of independents and just 21 percent of Republicans.

There’s a similar divide by ideology, with approval for the grand jury action ranging from 74 percent among strong conservatives to 47 percent of moderates and 29 percent of liberals. At the same time 62 percent of liberals say they’d approve of the federal government bringing civil rights charges; 51 percent of moderates agree, dropping to 29 percent of strong conservatives.

The generational differences are equally sharp, with 62 percent of seniors approving of the grand jury decision, compared with 30 percent of those under age 30. And while two-thirds of millennials approve of efforts to pursue a civil case, just a third of seniors agree.

Other gaps also appear, with support for the grand jury action and opposition to filing federal civil charges rising with income and higher among college graduates than non-graduates. Also, men are more likely than women to approve of the grand jury decision.

OFFICIAL RESPONSE – Majorities, meanwhile, look askance at the way local officials and Barack Obama alike have handled the situation. By 52-39 percent, the public disapproves of how the police and other local authorities in Ferguson have dealt with the protests there. Obama’s handling of the situation gets an identical score.

Views on both these questions are marked by further (but less sharp) racial and political gaps. Disapproval of the local response is highest among blacks, Democrats and liberals. These same groups are disproportionately likely to approve of Obama’s efforts, as are political moderates.

METHODOLOGY – This ABC News/Washington Post poll was conducted by landline and cellphone Nov. 25-26 and 28-30, 2014, in English and Spanish, among a random national sample of 1,011 adults. Results have a margin of sampling error of 3.5 points. The survey was produced for ABC News by Langer Research Associates of New York, N.Y.

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bulentozber/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The average price of a gallon of gas in the U.S. fell by over four cents in the last week, following a decision by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries to keep oil production at the levels previously set.

The average gallon nationwide dropped to $2.78, compared to $2.82 last week. The biggest drop in price came in the Rocky Mountain region, where a gallon costs, on average, seven cents less than it did last week.

The West Coast remains the most expensive place to buy gas, with the average gallon costing $3.12, while the Gulf Coast has the lowest prices at $2.53.

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Purestock/Thinkstock(DAMASCUS, Syria) — The United Nations World Food Programme said Monday it will suspend a voucher program that helps to feed nearly two million Syrian refugees in neighboring countries.

The U.N. program distributes vouchers to refugees in Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey, Iraq, and Egypt, which allow them to purchase food in local stores. Still, the WFP says it requires $64 million to support the refugees for the month of December.

“We are very concerned about the negative impact these cuts will have on the refugees as well as the countries which host them,” WFP Regional Emergency Coordinator for the Syria Crisis Muhannad Hadi said.

The U.S. Agency for International Development responded to the suspension by expressing concern. “It is absolutely essential for the entire global community to step forward,” the agency said in a statement.

The Syrian National Coalition also expressed concern, saying that the suspension of vouchers could cause “thousands of families to starve to death and will put much more pressure on already strained hosting countries, struggling to accommodate hundreds of thousands of Syrian refugees.”

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