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Pixie Dust(NEW YORK) — When a mother with a child on the autism spectrum had a hard time finding a birthday venue to celebrate her child’s second birthday, she decided to create her own space for children with special needs.

Raquel Noriega said that to celebrate her 2-year-old daughter Ava’s birthday, she wanted a venue that hosted only one birthday party at a time and that wasn’t “too crowded.”

“Most venues…had too much stimulation, music going, lights going. It was just chaos, and it’s not really good for a child with sensory issues,” Noriega, 40, told ABC News, adding that she didn’t even celebrate Ava’s first birthday because she couldn’t find a place.

According to autism advocacy organization Autism Speaks, children with autism often have a hard time “processing sensory information.” For many on the spectrum, loud music may sound really loud and fluorescent lights may appear so bright it’s excruciating.

Thankfully, Noriega found a venue for her daughter — Pixie Dust in Bay Shore, New York. And instead of hosting a party, she decided to buy the venue last month to help other children with special needs.

Pixie Dust is able to completely customize its offerings for children on the spectrum. It can accommodate up to 20 children and can adjust lighting, music and the length of play time.

The venue also offers sensory play, which stimulates the five senses — from playing with colorful scented rice to fiddling with musical instruments. “We really get down and dirty,” Noriega added.

The children’s play is supervised by a staffer who is a special education teacher and therapist.

“Every child with autism is different,” Noriega said, explaining that she recently had hosted a child who “doesn’t like noise during sensory play.”

“So we sat around in a circle and whispered songs. We didn’t shout them,” she continued. “The whispering didn’t bother the other kids. But if you don’t have those options available, the child will not enjoy the party. They could have a meltdown and then they’d have to leave.”

Along with specialized activities, Pixie Dust offers a diverse menu with gluten-free options. Noriega added, “The bakery that we use is a nut-free facility and we can create diary-free cupcakes or cakes.”

Noriega said she hopes Pixie Dust can help parents just like her.

“I’m open to do anything to make them have a memorable birthday,” she said.

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State Department(WASHINGTON) — Tensions between Turkey and the U.S. escalated Saturday, as Secretary of State John Kerry took issue with Turkish president Recap Tayyip Erdogan’s insinuations that the U.S. played a part in this weekend’s failed coup, that left 265 dead and 1,440 wounded.

At issue is Fethullah Gulen, a Muslim cleric who lives in Pennsylvania in self-exile, whom Erdogan is demanding be extradited to Turkey. Erdogan claims Gulen is behind the attempted coup, and the U.S., for all extensive purposes, is harboring him.

But Kerry slammed any implications that the U.S. had any involvement in the attempted coup. “He made clear that the United States would be willing to provide assistance to Turkish authorities conducting this investigation, but that public insinuations or claims about any role by the United States in the failed coup attempt are utterly false and harmful to our bilateral relations,” Kerry spokesman John Kirby said late Saturday, referring to a conversation between Kerry and Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavosoglu.

Erdogan has claimed that Gulen inspired and mobilized his supporters in his native Turkey, and directed the coup. Gulen, a staunch democracy advocate, is a former Erdogan ally turned bitter foe who has been put on trial in absentia in Turkey.

And Erdogan, saying he is convinced Gulen is responsible for the attempted coup, is not mincing words over his anger with the U.S. “I say to America: Either execute or give the man who lives in a 400,000 square meter area in Pennsylvania,” Ergodan told a crowd of supporters in Turkey Saturday. “I call again after the attempted coup. Deliver him to Turkey.”

Erdogan has also questioned the countries’ relationship adding, “If we are strategic partners, then listen to your partner and do what we say. We gave you whatever terrorist you demanded. Now, give us the person that is on our terror list”

Earlier in the day, though, Kerry was less harsh, telling reporters while in Luxembourg, “We fully anticipate that there will be questions raised about Mr. Gulen. And obviously we would invite the government of Turkey, as we always do, to present us with any legitimate evidence that withstands scrutiny. And the United States will accept that and look at it and make judgments about it appropriately.”

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Rana Sajid Hussain/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images(MULTAN, Pakistan) — A social media star known as “Pakistan’s Kim Kardashian” was murdered in an apparent “honor killing,” according to police.

Qandeel Baloch, 26, was found Saturday morning strangled to death in Multan, Punjab, police said according to BBC.

Baloch was known for being Pakistan’s first social media celebrity, but created controversy by posting photos online including a selfie she took with Muslim cleric Mufti Abdul Qawi, who was suspended after the photo was published.

#ban #qandeelbaloch pic.twitter.com/0Um4iEIeIO

— Qandeel Baloch (@QandeelQuebee) July 11, 2016

The internet star’s parents said Baloch was killed by her brother after they had an argument, according to the Express Tribune. Her brother, Wasim, had reportedly told her to stop modeling and posting controversial photos.

Wasim has not been arrested and is now on the run, police said according to BBC.

Police said Baloch was in hiding in Multan because she was concerned for her safety in Karachi, according to BBC.

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iStock/Thinkstock(ISTANBUL) — An American family was stuck in Istanbul’s international airport Friday night as a violent coup attempt against Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan put Turkey on lockdown.

Scott Wiggins, his wife and their three children were waiting for their next flight in Atatürk Airport when a faction of the Turkish military took over state TV, imposed martial law and a curfew and attacked the police headquarters in the capital of Ankara on Friday night.

The Wiggins family is traveling with three other couples to Iraq’s Kurdish region to teach English with a nongovernmental organization. But the airport in Istanbul where they were transiting was closed for much of Friday as violence broke out across the country amid the attempted military coup.

“We managed to find a corner of a lounge to stay the night and wait for news,” Wiggins told ABC News. “There’s tension in the air because of what occurred here last month.”

It’s the second time in the past three weeks that the Atatürk Airport, one of the world’s busiest aviation hubs, was forced to shutter its operations. Three suicide bombers struck the airport on June 28, leaving 44 people dead.

As the coup attempt was under way Friday night and into Saturday morning, explosions, gunfire and the buzz of military aircraft were heard around Istanbul and Ankara. Video showed protesters climbing onto military tanks near Atatürk Airport and feverishly chanting the name of the Turkish president.

“Last night there were several false alarm stampedes. The sonic boom of low flying jets rattled the whole place. We’re stressed to say the least,” Wiggins told ABC News.

The Turkish government declared the attempted military coup over Saturday morning and Istanbul’s international airport reopened. Turkish Airlines first reported that flights had resumed on Twitter and later released an official statement.

“With the unflinching will of the people, Turkey has awakened to a new day with a much stronger sense of democracy and freedom,” Turkish Airlines said. “Upon the call of our President H.E. Recep Tayyip Erdogan our operations at Istanbul Atatürk Airport are now back to normal and flights have begun.”

But the United States is still advising its government employees in the country to only go out during daylight hours, avoid unnecessary travel and not go to the Atatürk Airport. U.S. citizens in Turkey were encouraged not to go to the U.S. Embassy or consulates, to avoid areas where there are demonstrations or large crowds, and generally to use extreme caution.

“We are still hearing reports of sporadic gunfire,” the U.S. Embassy in Ankara said in a security message to U.S. citizens. “Security at Atatürk Airport is significantly diminished.”

The message notes the Federal Aviation Administration’s notice on Friday that U.S. airline carriers are prohibited from flying to or from Istanbul or Ankara airports.

“All airline carriers, regardless of country of registry, are prohibited from flying into the United States from Turkey either directly or via third country,” the security message says.

Although Wiggins said he had seen some activity on the airport’s flight board Saturday, he didn’t see any planes, flight crews or pilots to support the notion that operations are truly back up and running.

“We aren’t sure what to do,” he told ABC News. “We’d be happy to wait out a flight if it seemed things were getting organized, but we aren’t convinced it is.”

Since speaking with ABC News, Wiggins and his family have left Atatürk Airport and are in a hotel.

Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said 161 were killed in the overnight coup attempt and 1,440 people were injured. Speaking at a press conference Saturday afternoon local time, Yildirim referred to the dead as “martyrs.”

Yildirim also described the attempted coup as a “dark stain for Turkish democracy” and blamed it on the “parallel terrorist organization” — a term used by authorities to describe the movement of Pennsylvania-based Turkish cleric Fethullah Gülen, who lives in self-imposed exile. Early in the coup attempt Friday night, Turkey’s president pointed his finger at Gulen, his former political ally, who responded by strongly condemning the attempted military coup and denying any involvement.

Erdogan returned to Istanbul late Friday night after going to an undisclosed location and vowed that those who carried out the coup will “pay.”

The prime minister said the government has detained 2,839 military members. And according to Gen. Umit Dundar, who was appointed Turkey’s acting Chief of General Staff, 104 people involved in the attempted coup have been killed.

According to the country’s Ministry of Interior, 29 colonels and five generals were relieved of their duties.

About 200 unarmed soldiers left Turkey’s military headquarters and surrendered to police, the country’s state-run Anadolu Agency reported.

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WPVI-TV(CHARLOTTE, N.C.) — One couple’s relationship reached new highs after they got married on a North Carolina roller coaster this week.

James and Cortni Music were married at Carowinds Amusement Park, the site of their first date after being friends for years.

At 325 feet in the air, they both shouted, “I do!” on the Fury 325 roller coaster, alongside a minister.

Fury 325 is the world’s tallest and fastest Giga Coaster in the world reaching a top speed of 95 miles per hour.

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iStock/Thinkstock(ISTANBUL) — Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan called on the United States Saturday to extradite to Turkey the U.S.-based moderate Islamic cleric he claims is behind Friday night’s military coup attempt.

Erdogan made the demand during a televised speech addressing supporters outside his residence in Istanbul. He said Turkey had always cooperated with any extradition request for “terrorists” by the United States, emphasizing Turkey’s joint role with the U.S. government in fighting terrorism.

“I say if we are strategic partners then you should bring about our request,” Erdogan said.

Fethullah Gulen, who lives in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania, has rejected the notion that he has any involvement in the attempt to seize power from Erdogan and said that he condemns “in the strongest terms, the attempted military coup in Turkey.”

“Government should be won through a process of free and fair elections, not force,” Gulen, who left Turkey in 1999, said in a statement Friday night. “As someone who suffered under multiple military coups during the past five decades, it is especially insulting to be accused of having any link to such an attempt. I categorically deny such accusations.”

Gulen and Erdogan were once political allies before falling out over corruption allegations leveled at the Turkish president. Since then, Erdogan has frequently accused the Muslim cleric of trying to overthrow the government.

Early in the coup attempt Friday night, Erdogan pointed his finger at his former ally, saying, “This is not a country that can be run from Pennsylvania.”

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said the Obama administration would consider Erdogan’s extradition request, given that Turkey can prove Gulen’s wrongdoing.

“We fully anticipate that there will be questions raised about Mr. Gulen,” Kerry told reporters while visiting Luxembourg Saturday. “And obviously we would invite the government of Turkey, as we always do, to present us with any legitimate evidence that withstands scrutiny. And the United States will accept that and look at it and make judgments about it appropriately.”

The Turkish government announced earlier Saturday it foiled an attempted coup, initiated by a faction of the military that took over state TV, imposed martial law and a curfew and attacked the police headquarters in the capital of Ankara.

“The situation unfolded in Turkey was a coup attempt to overthrow the democratically-elected government,” read a statement released by the Turkish embassy in Washington, D.C. “This attempt was foiled by the Turkish people in unity and solidarity. Our President and Government are in charge. Turkish Armed Forces was not involved in the coup attempt in its entirety. It was conducted by a clique within the Armed Forces and received a well-deserved response from our nation.”

Erdogan returned to Istanbul late Friday night after going to an undisclosed location and vowed that those who carried out the coup will “pay.” Earlier, he urged supporters to take to the streets in defiance.

Upon arrival at Istanbul’s Ataturk Airport, the Turkish president addressed thousands of flag-waving supporters, saying the coup won’t succeed.

“They have pointed the people’s guns against the people,” he said. “The president, whom 52 percent of the people brought to power, is in charge. This government brought to power by the people, is in charge. They won’t succeed as long as we stand against them by risking everything.”

Erdogan also called the coup a “gift from God” because it will help Turkey clean out the military from the “members of this gang.” The timing of the coup was “meaningful,” because the military will start meetings in the beginning of August, and those who staged the coup were afraid of the decisions that would be made at those meetings, Erdogan said.

“This is not old Turkey,” he added. “This is new Turkey.”

Turkish Prime Minister Benali Yildirim said 161 were killed in the overnight coup attempt and 1,440 people were wounded. Speaking at a press conference Saturday afternoon local time, Yildirim referred to the dead as “martyrs.” He also described the attempted coup as a “dark stain for Turkish democracy” and blamed it on the “parallel terrorist organization” — a term used by authorities to describe the transnational religious and social movement led by Gulen.

The prime minister said the government has detained 2,839 military members. And according to Gen. Umit Dundar, who was appointed acting Chief of General Staff, 104 coup plotters have been killed.

According to the Ministry of Interior, 29 colonels and five generals were relieved of their duties.

About 200 unarmed soldiers left Turkey’s military headquarters and surrendered to police, Anadolu Agency reported.

Ataturk Airport, one of the busiest aviation hubs in the world, reopened on Saturday with Turkish Airlines announcing it had resumed operations.

“Upon the call of our President and Commander-In-Chief H.E. Recep Tayyip Erdogan, our operations at Istanbul Ataturk Airport have gone back to normal and our flights resuming safely,” the airline announced around 7:30 a.m. local time.

Earlier in the day, a source at Istanbul Haydarpasa Hospital told ABC News that at least six people had been killed and 100 injured from the clashes that resulted from the coup attempt. Video shows Turkish military firing over hundreds of protesters’ heads as they approached a tank on a highway.

It was not clear who was behind the attempted coup, but a broadcaster for state TV read a letter from a group calling itself the “Turkish peace council” saying that martial law is being imposed. The news anchor says media personnel were handcuffed and forced to read what they were given.

CNN Turk has said that soldiers entered their building, the Dogan Media Center, which also houses the newspaper Hurriyet and DHA, a broadcaster. Shouting could be heard in the background as an image of the studio broadcast on TV.

Later, the Turkish army’s chief of staff, Hulusi Akar, was rescued from detention and is back on duty after a military operation, the prime minister said. Those that held him hostage have been “eliminated,” Yildirim said. The rescue operation was launched at Akincilar air base in the outskirts of Ankara. He was taken there by helicopter after being taken hostage at military headquarters in Ankara.

Yildirim added that security forces were doing what is necessary to resolve the situation.

Speaking on Turkish television, Yildirim said the military leadership has ordered all soldiers back to their bases. The prime minister called those behind the coup “traitors” and called the move “a terrorist act.”

Turkey’s state-run Anadolu Agency reported that a military helicopter had attacked Ankara police headquarters. It was not clear if there were any injuries. Other clashes and explosions were also been heard in the capital city, while video posted to Twitter show military jets flying over the city.

The Bosphorus Bridge and Fatih Sultan Mehmet Bridge in Istanbul were closed and Turkey’s Dogan News Agency reports the national police directorate had summoned all police to duty in Ankara Friday night.

At first, the scene at Taksim Square, a popular tourist destination in Istanbul, was tense but calm, and people were lining up at ATMs to withdraw cash and buying bread and water in case services go down, an eyewitness told ABC News. Video posted to Instagram showed crowds of people lining up at a grocery store and ATMs.

Shortly after, pro-military chants started to take place in the square, and then shots were fired, forcing people to leave, she said.

Shortly after, pro-military chants started to take place in the square, and then shots were fired, forcing people to leave, she said.

In a FaceTime interview with CNN Turk, Erdogan called on his supporters to gather in the country’s squares and airports.

“We will give a strong reply to the leader of the coup,” Erdogan said. “I declare those responsible will receive the highest penalty.”

Erdogan was reported to have been at his summer house in the south of Turkey, but he is now back in Istanbul. Turkish TV showed him being mobbed by supporters after he landed.

A senior defense official told ABC News that the Department of Defense is concerned about the situation and is trying to assess the facts. There are 2,200 U.S. personnel stationed in Turkey. A total of 1,500 U.S. service members and civilian employees are at Incirlik Air Base, which has been at an elevated force protection level since March, when it also ordered non-essential personnel out, the official said.

Confirming media reports of gunshots & possible attempted uprising in #Turkey. Remain vigilant.

— Travel – State Dept (@TravelGov) July 15, 2016

U.S. citizens in Turkey were told to shelter in place and stay indoors, the U.S. State Department said Friday night, adding to contact family and friends to inform them they’re safe. The state department also confirmed that martial law and a curfew was imposed in Turkey, and U.S citizens were advised not to attempt to travel to the U.S. Embassy in Ankara or Consulates at this time.

The U.S. embassy said it has seen reports that social media has been blocked. Twitter said it found “no reason” to think it was fully blocked in Turkey, but it suspects there is an international slowing of traffic in the country.

We have no reason to think we’ve been fully blocked in #Turkey, but we suspect there is an intentional slowing of our traffic in country.

— Policy (@policy) July 15, 2016

President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry said all parties in Turkey should support the democratically elected government of Turkey, show restraint and avoid any violence or bloodshed, a statement from the White House read. The State Department will continue to focus on the safety and security of U.S. citizens in Turkey, and the president asked that Kerry continue to brief him as the situation unfolds.

Turkey has a history of military coups. The last coup was in 1980, when 650,000 people were put under arrest. The country has the second largest army after the U.S. and any NATO country. Turkey joined NATO in 1952 and has remained a NATO member throughout its previous coups.

In 2012, more than 300 military officers were jailed over an alleged conspiracy to overthrow Erdogan’s government.

The armed forces were long viewed as guardians of secular republic established by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, carrying out three coups between 1960 and 1980 and pushing an Islamist-led government from power in 1997.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — U.S. troops at Turkey’s Incirlik air base were at the highest force protection level, known as “condition Delta,” after the power was cut off at the base and the Turkish government closed the airspace around the site just hours after a foiled military coup attempt, a U.S. official told ABC News.

Turkey allows the United States to use the air base for operations associated with its air campaign against ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

There are 2,200 U.S. personnel in Turkey, including 1,500 stationed at Incirlik.

A Pentagon spokesman said the loss of commercial power to Incirlik has not affected operations because the U.S. facilities there are operating on internal power sources. U.S. officials are working with their Turkish counterparts to resume air operations at the air base. All U.S. government personnel in Turkey appear safe and secure, he added.

“Turkish government has closed its airspace to military aircraft, and as a result air operations at Incirlik Air Base have been halted at this time,” Pentagon Press Secretary Peter Cook told ABC News. “In the meantime, U.S. Central Command is adjusting flight operations in the counter-ISIL campaign to minimize any effects on the campaign.”

A faction of the Turkish military took over state TV, imposed martial law and a curfew and attacked the police headquarters in the capital of Ankara on Friday night. The Turkish government declared the attempted military coup over Saturday morning.

Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said 161 people were killed in the overnight coup attempt and 1,440 people were injured.

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State Department(NEW YORK) — Secretary of State John Kerry has said the United States and Russia have agreed to “concrete steps” for trying to revive a crumbling ceasefire in Syria, following a day of marathon talks in Moscow.

Neither side would share details, but Kerry’s announcement appeared to suggest that Russia and the U.S. reached a preliminary deal to coordinate airstrikes together against jihadist groups in Syria, potentially representing a major shift in U.S. policy in the conflict.

Kerry made the announcement alongside his Russian counterpart, Sergey Lavrov, at a news conference in Moscow after the lengthy discussions that stretched throughout Thursday.

Before the talks, the Washington Post leaked a proposal document allegedly outlining what Kerry would offer to Russia. State Department officials have indicated the document was authentic, while declining to comment directly on it.

At Thursday’s news conference, Kerry would not confirm whether the steps agreed with Moscow were the same as those laid out in the leaked proposal, though he strongly implied that they dealt with the same issues targeted in the proposal.

The proposal published in full on the Post’s website calls for the U.S. and Russia to collaborate militarily together against Jabhat al-Nusra, Al-Qaeda’s affiliate in Syria — something long desired by Moscow. In return, the proposal would require that the Syrian air force be largely grounded.

At the news conference, Kerry first described the two main causes of the breakdown of Syria’s ceasefire as indiscriminate bombing by the Syrian government and offensives by al-Nusra. Kerry then said that he and Lavrov had “agreed to steps that if implemented in good faith can address the serious problems that I just described about the cessation.”

Kerry said that Russia and the U.S. would not be making thee steps public, saying that is “because we want them to work.” He added that the steps would have to be further developed in the coming days.

Kerry’s statements suggested that the proposal leaked to the Post had been accepted in some format at least in principle by the Russians. In the leaked document, Russia and the U.S. would create a “Joint Implementation Group” based in Amman, Jordan, that would coordinate attacks on al-Nusra by Russian and U.S. military forces. Assad’s air force meanwhile would be forbidden from flying sorties in areas where al-Nusra is concentrated or in opposition-controlled areas where al-Nusra is operating.

If carried out, the proposal would represent major shifts for both Russia and the U.S. .

The U.S has regularly accused Russia and the Assad regime of using claims that it is targeting al-Nusra and the Islamic State as cover for actually hitting moderate opposition groups. The deal, if implemented, appeared to seek to end this possibility.

The removal of the Syrian air force from much of the battlefield would be a major breakthrough; continued bombing of groups involved in the ceasefire, as well as of civilians, has previously led opposition groups to suspend their participation in U.N.-backed peace talks. At the same time, U.S. officials have said al-Nusra was undermining the ceasefire by attacking the regime, often dragging more moderate groups into offensives and thereby breaching the ceasefire of which it was not a part and creating what Kerry called a “cycle of excuses” for more violence.

The potential deal was therefore meant to target these two problems.

The proposal has however been criticized as risking allying the U.S. with Syrian president Bashar al-Assad by helping Russia strike a group that has been one of the Syrian government’s most formidable opponents and that is entwined with many other rebel groups. Kerry has also been criticized for putting too much faith in the Russians to uphold their side of the deal.

On Thursday, Kerry made it clear that in theoir talks the two sides had not been able to yet persuade one another the deal could or would definitely be implemented, but he suggested the groundwork was sufficient to try.

Kerry said he wanted to emphasize that the deal was “not based on trust” and that there were specific steps that would have to be shown to have been carried out. But he said that the deal if carried out in good faith “has the opportunity to change the playing field significantly.”

“Let the proof be in the pudding, not our words,” he said.

The ambitiousness of the proposal and the risks around it reflect a sense among U.S. officials that time is running out to establish a lasting peace in Syria. The ceasefire brokered by Moscow and Washington in February has collapsed in many areas, while U.N.-backed talks have stalled amid the violence. Officials said that unless the two key problems undermining the ceasefire — al-Nusra and bombing by the Syrian regime — could be resolved jointly with Moscow, the ceasefire could collapse definitively.

“Either we find a way to do something about it or not, and if we don’t, the entire thing breaks down,” a senior State Department official said before the talks began. “And so the conversation here is about, can we find a way to address these two problems? If not, obviously that will be the end of the cessation of hostilities.”

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ABC News(NICE, France) — ISIS has claimed responsibility for Thursday’s deadly truck attack in Nice, France, according to a statement released this morning by the group’s media outlet.

Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, a 31-year-old Tunisian citizen and resident of Nice who worked as a delivery man, drove a truck into a crowd during Bastille Day celebrations, killing at least 84 people and injuring 202 others. Four children remain in critical condition. One of whom is 10-years-old, but his identity remains unknown, since authorities are still trying to find family members.

The Aamaq news agency on Saturday cited a “security source” as saying the attacker — it did not name Bouhlel — “carried out the operation in response to calls to target the citizens of coalition countries fighting the Islamic State.” The group also described the attacker as a “soldier” of the organization.

The terror group’s claim comes as French president Francois Hollande chairs a security and defence meeting in Paris at 9 a.m. local time.

Five individuals have also been detained for questioning by French authorities, following Thursday’s attack, a spokeswoman for the French prosecutor’s office said Saturday.

One of the five people detained by police is Bouhlel’s ex-wife, who was taken into custody Friday morning. The four others are not family members, but friends or acquaintances.

Investigators are working to determine whether Bouhlel had any accomplices.

A vigil for the victims was slated for this morning, but it was cancelled by officials who cited security reasons.

The promenade and beaches are due to reopen at noon local time on Satuday.

During an interview with French radio, Bouhlel’s father said he had not seen his son in four years. He also claimed he had psychiatric problems.

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(NICE, France) — Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, the 31-year-old man identified as the driver behind the deadly attack in Nice, France, drove 1.2 miles along a seafront promenade Thursday night as crowds were gathered to watch fireworks for Bastille Day.

The 19-ton refrigerated truck Bouhlel used to kill dozens of people and injure hundreds more was rented on Monday, but wasn’t pick up until 9:45 p.m. Thursday night. Bouhlel arrived alone on bicycle, then drove west to the city.

ABC News

Security cameras show the truck at 10:30 p.m. driving toward the Promenade des Anglais, and at 10:45 p.m., Bouhlel turned onto the promenade, driving for a little over a mile as he mowed down bystanders.

Bouhlel fired shots from the truck multiple times, striking three police officers around the Negresco Hotel. Police returned fire, but the truck managed to drive another 300 meters before the driver stopped. He was then shot and killed by police.

The driver was found dead in the truck’s passenger seat. In the truck, authorities found the bicycle he rode to the rental agency on, some empty pallets, the automatic pistol he used to shoot from the truck and ammunition. Also found were four fake guns, a malfunctioning grenade, a mobile phone, a driver’s license and a bank card.

Eighty-four people were killed in the attack and 202 were injured.

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