About the author  ⁄ Doug Jenkins

5/25/2016 – 10:47 am

Now that summer is almost here, and with kids being out and about more often than before, the HATS Transportation Service in Findlay and Hancock County is there to serve them. Laurie Collins with HATS says the service allows children over the age of nine to ride the service without being accompanied by a parent or a guardian.

Audio: Laurie Collins

This policy is always in place for HATS Transportation but Collins says that it is particularly helpful in the summer months for kids to get around the community for activities. Cost and the scheduling of the rides is the same for the kids as it is for the rest of the year.

Audio: Laurie Collins

Collins says that the program is generally helpful to parents who work and have trouble getting their kids to summer activities and events. This is a service offered year round through the HATS Transportation Service.

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5/25/16 – 10:38 A.M.

Findlay Mayor Lydia Mihalik is echoing the sentiments of the Hancock County Commissioners; federal funding is not likely for a Blanchard River flood mitigation project. The Mayor talked to city council members Wednesday about a recent meeting with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers…

Audio: Lydia Mihalik

Both Mihalik and Service-Safety Director Paul Schmelzer say it was worth trying to get federal funding for the project, but the federal cost-benefit ratio makes that a long-shot at this point. They added the Corps study has been worthwhile in that it has laid the groundwork for a local flood mitigation plan…

Audio: Paul Schmelzer

Schmelzer adds the Blanchard River project would be up against billion-dollar projects elsewhere in the nation. With that in mind, he says it’s time to look at the local benefits and options.

Mihalik and Schmelzer say a regional economic impact study could be conducted as part of the local engineering plan for a diversion channel….

Audio: Paul Schmelzer

Both Schmelzer and Mayor Lydia Mihalik say they believe the local study will show a diversion channel would benefit the region as a whole.

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5/25/16 – 7:12 A.M.

The suspect in the death of a former West Virginia coal mining executive was arrested in Allen County Tuesday. Officials say Anthony Arriaga was found in Delphos. Investigators believe Arriaga killed Bennet Hatfield in a West Virginia cemetery this week.

Hatfield was in charge of the company that owned the Sago Mine when a dozen people were killed in a 2006 accident.

A second person is also in custody in the case.

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5/25/16 – 6:49 A.M.

The North Baltimore School District will have to fill two administrative positions this year. The Courier reports district treasurer Eve Baldwin is retiring at the end of December. She’s been in her position for 26 years.

Powell Elementary School Principal Scott Lockwood is stepping down on July 31. He’s been on medical leave since last summer. Pam Van Mooy served as the interim principal in his place.

MORE: The Courier

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5/25/16 – 5:30 A.M.

Seneca County Commissioner Holly Stacy is filing a complaint with the Ohio Elections Commission. The complaint, which has to do with the activities of the “Citizens for Seneca County” political action committee, hasn’t made it to Columbus just yet. A representative with the office tells the Review-Times several media outlets have been asking about the filing.

The complaint raises several issues about the actions of Citizens for Seneca County and Rich Focht, a Republican who ran against Stacy in March. Among the complaints is an accusation that the PAC and Focht coordinated activities. Stacey says this would violate Ohio election laws. The filing also says the PAC and Focht’s campaign worked together to cover polling expenses.

Once the election commission officially receives the paperwork, it will review the complaints. If it finds any wrongdoing it can issue fines.

MORE: Review-Times

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5/25/16 – 5:12 A.M.

An effort to help prevent overdose deaths is headed to Governor John Kasich’s desk. The Courier reports the “Good Samaritan Bill,” written by State Representative Robert Sprague, was passed in the Ohio Senate by a 23-to-10 vote. The bill would protect people from being charged with minor drug offenses if they call first responders to help an overdose victim.

High-level offenders would be not protected under the law. People on “community control” would also be ineligible for protections.

Sprague says the bill will help save lives and catch drug dealers. He expects the governor to sign House Bill 110 into law within 21 days.

MORE: The Courier

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5/25/16 – 5:00 A.M.

A graduate of the Hancock County Drug Court is working to pay it forward. The Courier reports that while 25-year-old Devin Davis has completed the recovery program, he still showed up at Tuesday’s session to support others who are taking part. Davis tells the newspaper, “I’m just taking care of myself and trying to take care of others too.”

Davis entered the program in March of 2015 when he was facing a trafficking heroin charge. At the time, he told Judge Reginald Routson that he had been sober for months and wanted to be on the right path. He’s now been sober since July of 2014.

Davis says he appreciates what the program has done for him. He added, “if I wasn’t given all the support, I would probably be in jail or dead right now.”

There were 32 people taking part in the drug court as of last week.

MORE: The Courier

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5/25/16 – 4:24 A.M.

A Putnam County teenager is getting national recognition for following his instincts. WTOL-TV reports Cole Dotson of Continental was passing a school this past weekend when he noticed the American flag had fallen to the ground. Using his knowledge from Boy Scouts, Dotson picked up the flag and held on to it until someone from the school could hoist it up again. U.S. Flag etiquette rules say the flag should never be allowed to touch the ground.

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5/25/16 – 4:22 A.M.

Fewer people will be attending Owens Community College this fall. The school says enrollment is expected to drop by as much as eleven-percent next year, continuing an ongoing downward trend. Enrollment declines have, in part, forced the college to cut programs and staff this year to shore up the bottom line. Despite the bad news, Owens officials say more of their students are staying in school to finish their degrees.

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