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Denise/S.L. Bradley (AUSTIN, Texas) — Texas high school student Chase Bradley wasn’t just inspired to raise money for cancer research. He also donated his scholarship money to a fellow student who had recently overcome the disease.

Chase, 17, a junior at Hyde Park High School in Austin, Texas, gave away his prize to survivor Sergio Garcia, 18, since his sister, Hunter Bradley, also beat cancer five years ago.

“I remember my dad told me, ‘Chase, your sister has cancer,'” Chase told ABC News. “I didn’t know what it meant at the time. I didn’t know what it meant for a family. I remember being in my her hospital room, trying to keep a straight face and not cry in front of her. It was a very heartbreaking setting. I gave my sister a hug and it was very overwhelming.”

This year, Chase joined 13 other students in the Austin area to raise money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

Chase was awarded the $2,500 scholarship money after raising $57,000 for the society in seven weeks.

“He started a letter writing campaign, phone calls, emails, social media and reached out to friends and family and a lot of people who have followed our daughter’s story,” Chase’s mom, Denise Bradley, told ABC News.

The fundraiser was part of his school’s “Student of the Year” competition. Chase said he knew he was going to give the $2,500 away to a cancer survivor even before he won the scholarship.

“I knew I couldn’t keep this scholarship because cancer — it doesn’t impact just that one person,” he said. “The last thing they want to worry about in fighting cancer is having enough money to go to college.”

After receiving the scholarship, Chase and his family asked the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society to help identify a high school student area who had battled cancer and could benefit form having a college scholarship.

The society connected Chase to Sergio Garcia. Sergio was diagnosed with leukemia in 2013, but has been cancer-free for almost two years, he told ABC News.

On May 8, Chase handed the scholarship over to Sergio during an end-of-the-year awards ceremony at Hyde Park High School.

“It was just absolutely moving,” said Denise Bradley. “Chase called Sergio to stand up next to him and told Sergio he respected and admired his strength during his cancer battle and he handed the scholarship over to him.”

Chase’s father, S.L. Bradley, said he was pleased with his son’s kind act.

“He was sacrificing for a greater cause,” S.L. Bradley told ABC News. “Because of this, I was really proud of what he’s done.”

Sergio said he was very grateful to accept Chase’s scholarship.

“It was something really nice that he did for me and I didn’t even know him,” he added. “We’ve become really good friends after that. [I plan] to pay some of my tuition for college.”

Sergio will attend Austin Community College in the fall to study architecture before transferring to a 4-year institution, he said.

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ABC/Ida Mae Astute(NEW YORK) — Wonder Woman herself, Gal Gadot, says it’s “really, really magical” to play the most powerful woman in the DC Comics’ superhero world.

During an interview with the main cast of the Warner Bros. film, Gadot explained to Good Morning America, “I think it’s so important that girls and boys have a strong female figure to look up to. We always had Superman and Batman, which is awesome, but it’s also very important for all of us to have this amazing character.”

The actress, who also revealed she was five months pregnant with her youngest daughter while doing re-shoots for the film, said, “it’s crazy to think this character has been around for over 75 years and this is the first time we see her on the big screen and actually get to establish her origin story.”

Gadot, who added that “she never dreamt of being an actress,” said says of the role she first played in Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice, “It was an honor for me to do this part. I’m all about strong female figures and I love Wonder Woman.”

For her part, director Patty Jenkins said she’s a “huge believer in the story of becoming a hero,” and hopes everyone who sees the film feels inspired.

“I hope they have a great time and I hope they love it and I hope they laugh, but I also hope they feel inspired to be a hero in their own life,” she said. “And learn love and thoughtfulness as well as strength.”

Wonder Woman, which also stars Chris Pine and Robin Wright, hits theaters June 2.

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ABCNews.com(GRIFFIN, Ga.) — It was an emotional moment when special education teacher Kimberly Wimbish surprised her student, Jamias Howard, 19, with his graduation cap and gown — an accomplishment that certainly had its challenges along the way.

“Oh man, thank you,” Howard told Wimbish in her touching Facebook video that has now gone viral.

“Congratulations,” she replied through the car window.

“Appreciate it, ma’am. I love you so much,” said an overwhelmed Howard. “Thank you so much for everything you do for me. Appreciate it.”

After his devoted teacher reminded him about his graduation rehearsal at 8 a.m., Howard can be seen wiping away tears as he once again told her, “I love you so much.”

Getting to this heartwarming moment was no easy feat for these two, however.

“Jamias has had his challenges. He had additional challenges that wouldn’t afford him the opportunity to come to school to be educated,” Wimbish, a teacher at Griffin High School in Georgia, told ABC News. “I saw need, and I was able to fulfill that need. I had no problems volunteering to try to help him graduate.”

So that’s exactly what she did, meeting Howard for private tutoring after she finished teaching a full school day.

“We’d meet at the local library or a local park or Burger King, wherever he could walk to,” she said. “We’d go through lessons and I’d grade him and I’d teach him. He really worked. When I found out he had enough credits, I was just about to explode with excitement.”

Wimbish is used to dealing with difficult student situations, but Howard was a “very special case,” she said.

“It was like he didn’t trust anyone and he had up a wall. And before you got him, he was gonna get you,” she explained. “It was a challenge. It looked like he was never going to graduate, like he wasn’t going to be able to pull it together. All I could see was things not going well for him from that point on, had he not been given an opportunity to get it right, been given another chance.”

She so badly wanted to afford him that opportunity, and after a few minor setbacks, “He put in his time, and he worked, and I worked, and Lord knows it was a challenge, but it was well worth it,” said the determined teacher.

Howard is now graduating high school on Saturday, proudly walking across the stage in his hand-delivered cap and gown.

“Everything he’s been through, the challenges he’s faced, he’s going to be happy,” she proudly said of her student. “I had no idea he would get so emotional. He always tried to be a tough guy, but I had to break those walls down.”

Now Howard is going to have a whole crowd of people cheering him on from the stands.

“So many people have reached out to me,” said Wimbish. “They want to come to crowd the stadium in an uproar when they announce Jamias’ name. I’m just going to be happy for him and his mother.”

But it will be a proud mother moment for Wimbish too, whose own son is also graduating in the same ceremony.

“I feel like I have two sons graduating,” she said.

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moodboard/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Following Monday’s bombing that killed 22 and injured 59 at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, there are currently no plans to make significant security changes in the United States, according to a Department of Homeland Security official.

The DHS official said that the federal security posture in the U.S. is already at high levels and that there is not much more to be done in the aftermath of the attack, allegedly carried out by 22-year-old Salman Abedi with an improvised explosive device outside the concert at the Manchester Arena.

The official did insist that federal authorities will continually assess whether any new measures are warranted.

ABC News has additionally learned that state and local fusion centers across the country — which include representatives from local, state and federal agencies — are working to identify potentially vulnerable “open venues” and upcoming events in their regions, so that they can help local police put together their latest security plans for those events and venues.

The FBI is also holding a call later this afternoon with law enforcement across the country to lay out what they know so far about the Manchester attack and urge vigilance. The call will be hosted by FBI headquarters, and it will include the heads of FBI field offices across the country, as well as leaders from state and local law enforcement agencies across the country.

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Former CIA Director John Brennan told Congress that U.S. intelligence found contact between Russian officials and people involved with the Trump campaign at a time in 2016 when the Russians were “brazenly” interfering in the presidential election.

“I encountered and am aware of information and intelligence that revealed contacts and interactions between Russian officials and U.S. persons involved in the Trump campaign that I was concerned about because of known Russian efforts to suborn such individuals,” Brennan said Tuesday at an open session of the House Intelligence Committee. “And it raised questions in my mind again whether or not the Russians were able to gain the cooperation of those individuals,”

Brennan added, however, that he did not know whether any collusion existed as a result of those contacts. The president has dismissed such a possibility, saying there is no evidence of collusion.

Brennan testified that there was a “sufficient basis of information and intelligence that required further investigation” by the FBI to determine whether or not U.S. citizens were “actively conspiring, colluding” with Russian officials.

“I was worried by a number of the contacts that the Russians had with U.S. persons,” he said.

The former CIA chief said he was concerned because of tactics that Russians are known to use, including trying to get individuals, including U.S. persons, to act on their behalf. Russian intelligence operatives won’t identify themselves as Russians or as members of the Russian government; they will try to develop personal relationships with individuals and then over time, they will try to get those people to do things on their behalf, said Brennan.

“By the time I left office on January 20, I had unresolved questions in my mind as to whether or not the Russians had been successful in getting U.S. persons involved in the campaign or not to work on their behalf,” he said.

When asked if Russia’s contacts were with official members of the Trump campaign, Brennan repeatedly declined during the hearing to identify specific individuals because of the classified nature of the information.

Warning to the Russians

“It should be clear to everyone that Russia brazenly interfered in our 2016 presidential election process and that they undertook these activities despite our strong protests and explicit warning that they not do so,” Brennan during his opening remarks at Tuesday’s hearing.

He further testified that on Aug. 4, 2016, he warned the head of Russia’s intelligence service that any continued interference would destroy near-term prospects for improvement of relations between Washington and Moscow and would undermine the chance of their working together on matters of mutual interest.

During that meeting with Alexander Bortnikov, the head of Russia’s Federal Securities Bureau (FSB), Brennan said he warned that if Russia had such a campaign of interference underway, which had already been reported in the press, it would be “certain to backfire.”

“I said that all Americans, regardless of political affiliation or whom they might support in the election, cherish their ability to elect their own leaders without outside interference or disruption,” said Brennan.

The head of the FSB said Russia was not doing anything to influence the presidential election and claimed that Moscow is a traditional target of blame by Washington for such activities. Russia has since repeatedly denied any interference in the election.

Despite his denial, Bortnikov said he would inform Russian President Vladimir Putin of Brennan’s concerns, Brennan said.

The former CIA chief said his meeting with Bortnikov was primarily focused on Syria, but that he also told the Russian official that Moscow’s continued mistreatment of U.S. diplomats there was “irresponsible, reckless, intolerable, and needed to stop.”

Several months after that meeting, in January of this year, a declassified U.S. intelligence report was released which found that Putin “ordered” a campaign to influence the election in an attempt by Russia to “undermine public faith in the U.S. democratic process.”

Russia also sought to denigrate former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and harm her election prospects and potential presidency, U.S. intelligence agencies found at the time.

Trump’s Oval Office meeting with the Russians

Brennan said it is not unprecedented to share intelligence with Russia or other partners. But he said if reports are true that Trump shared information with Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Ambassador Sergey Kislyak at a White House meeting on May 10, it would have violated two protocols.

The first is that classified intelligence of this nature is not shared with visiting foreign ministers or local ambassadors, but rather through intelligence channels so that it’s handled the “right way” and to make sure it is not exposed, Brennan said.

Secondly, before sharing any classified intelligence with foreign partners, it is important to go back to the originating agency to make sure that sharing the language and substance is not going to reveal sources and methods, potentially compromising future collection capability, said Brennan.

“So, it appears as though, at least from the press reports, that neither did it go in the proper channels, nor did the originating agency have the opportunity to clear language for it. So, that is a problem,” said Brennan.

During the meeting, the president reportedly shared with the Russians intelligence information about ISIS that came from Israel.

Trump has defended his disclosure, arguing he has the right to share such information with Russia.

On Monday, while visiting Israel, Trump told reporters, “I never mentioned the word or the name Israel. Never mentioned it during our conversation.”

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SWNS.com(MANCHESTER, England) — The day after a devastating bombing in Manchester killed at least 22 people at an Ariana Grande concert, officials and parents alike are grappling with the news that many of the injured and killed were young adolescents or children.

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May called the bombing a “sickening attack” that targeted children and young people “who should have been enjoying one of the most memorable nights of their lives.”

“We struggle to comprehend the warped and twisted mind that sees a room packed with young children not as a scene to cherished but as an opportunity for carnage,” May said Tuesday.

The first two victims identified were just 8 and 18 years old, and at least 12 children under the age of 16 were seriously injured, officials said.

Saffie Rose Roussos

Among the dead is Saffie Rose Roussos, described by her teacher as a “beautiful little girl.”

Saffie had become separated from her mother and sister during the attack.

Chris Upton, the headteacher at the Tarleton Community Primary School, where Saffie was a student, released a statement calling the girl’s death a “tremendous shock.”

“I would like to send our deepest condolences to all of her family and friends,” Upton said. “The thought that anyone could go out to a concert and not come home is heartbreaking. Saffie was simply a beautiful little girl in every aspect of the word. She was loved by everyone and her warmth and kindness will be remembered fondly. Saffie was quiet and unassuming with a creative flair.”

Upton said the school will be calling in specialists to help students and staff cope with Saffie’s death.

Georgina Callander

Runshaw College confirmed that the 18-year-old college student was among the victims.

“It is with enormous sadness that it appears that one of the people who lost their lives in Monday’s Manchester attack was one of our students here at Runshaw College,” school officials said in a statement posted on Facebook. “Georgina Callander was a former Bishop Rawstorne pupil studying with us on the second year of her Health and Social Care course. Our deepest sympathies, thoughts and prayers go out to all of Georgina’s friends, family, and all of those affected by this loss.”

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iStock/Thinkstock(COLLEGE PARK, Md.) — Bowie State University honored senior student Richard Collins III during its commencement ceremony on Tuesday, just days after he was stabbed to death at the University of Maryland, College Park.

During Tuesday’s ceremony, Bowie State President Mickey Burnim honored Collins with a posthumous bachelor’s degree that was accepted by family and fellow cadets on his behalf.

Collins, 23, was stabbed in the chest Saturday, allegedly by 22-year-old University of Maryland student Sean Urbanski, according to police. He was set to graduate Tuesday and was recently commissioned in the Army as a second lieutenant, officials said.

Urbanski has been charged with first-degree murder, second-degree murder and first-degree assault. He is being held without bond and is due in court next month.

Police called the attack random and “totally unprovoked.”

The University of Maryland’s police department said it has asked the FBI to assist in the investigation after it discovered that Urbanski, who is white, belonged to a Facebook group named “Alt-Reich.” Collins was black.

Bowie State, a historically black college located in Maryland, held a candlelight vigil in honor of Collins on Monday at 7 p.m. local time.

The school honored Collins with a cap and gown draped over a chair at Tuesday’s ceremony and with a moment of silence.

“It is a tragic loss to see our national treasure, in the form of Lt. Collins, taken away from us in this manner,” FBI spokesman Gordon Johnson said at a press conference Sunday.

People who knew Collins described him as a “good young man” who was excited about his future.

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ABC/Ida Mae Astute(LOS ANGELES) — Janelle Monáe is headed back to the big screen in a new upcoming drama.

According to Variety, the singer and Hidden Figures actress will star alongside Steve Carrell and Leslie Mann in the new feature from Forrest Gump director Robert Zemeckis.

The film is based on the 2010 documentary with the same name and follows the true story of Mark Hogencamp, a man who built a miniature town in his garden after recovering from a coma caused by a vicious attack.

Details on Monáe’s character have yet to be revealed.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The contract transferring Babe Ruth from the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees is going to auction, ESPN reports.

Josh Evans of auction house Lelands.com said the original copy of the December 1919 document “transcends everything,” and that it “changed America.” It represents the deal in which then-Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sold Ruth to the Yankees in a deal totaling $100,000. The Yankees also loaned another $300,000 to Frazee to complete the deal, using a mortgage on Boston’s Fenway Park. If Frazee defaulted on the loan, ESPN reports, the Yankees would have owned Fenway — Boston’s home field.

One original copy of the document, which was last sold for $996,000 in 2005, onced belonged to then-Yankees owner Jacob Ruppert, according to ESPN. Both Ruppert and Frazee’s originals were held by collector Barry Halper, until Evans visited his home in the early 1990s. Evans then purchased Frazee’s copy for $25,000, and it later auctioned in 1993 for $99,000.

Evans bought Ruppert’s version of the contract, and sold it to another collector for $150,000. After 25 years, that collector is now consigning Ruppert’s copy of Babe Ruth’s Yankees contract to Lelands for the currect auction.

Of collectible professional athletic documents, contracts involving Babe Ruth are among the most valuable, ESPN reports.

Lelands will also auction Ruth’s 1927 World Series ring, now believed to be owned by Charlie Sheen.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — The deadly blast outside the security barriers of an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, marks the latest instance where a terror attack unfolded at a location that symbolized Western culture and also provided a so-called soft target.

Experts tell ABC News that soft targets offer terrorists both practical and symbolic value.

John Cohen, a former counter-terrorism coordinator for the Department of Homeland Security, listed concert venues, transportation hubs, hotels, shopping malls and sports venues as examples of soft targets.

“They are places that are difficult to harden because that would undermine the very reason they exist,” said Cohen, who is now an ABC News consultant.

Manchester has now canceled concerts scheduled for later this week as musicians around the world expressed their horror and condolences.

Karen Greenberg, director of the Center on National Security at Fordham University School of Law, said that an attack at a concert carries deep cultural connotations.

“The symbolism of attacking Westerners who are enjoying themselves is what makes it an attractive target,” said Greenberg, who is also the author of Rogue Justice: The Making of the Security State. “Terrorism is making civilians feel unsafe in their space.”

Evolving protection techniques

Security precautions have been ramped up throughout much of the U.S. and Europe in recent years in light of other attacks, though Greenberg said that in focusing on more obvious, high-profile targets, law enforcement may have merely diverted the possibility of attack into other areas.

“We’ve made it so secure in places that are known targets that they’ve pushed attacks into more marginalized places,” Greenberg said. “That’s an interesting part of what’s happened. Law enforcement has to secure not just the central places, but recognize what that means in terms of where it pushes an attack.”

Cohen noted that the evolving nature of how terror groups operate have placed soft targets in the sights of would-be terrorists who have not undergone military training.

“The tactics of groups like AQAP [Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula] and ISIS have changed, where they have sought to inspire [followers] primarily through the internet and social media,” Cohen said. “Attacking a soft target doesn’t require a high degree of planning and support. You can essentially get your weapon, go to a public place and kill or injure as many people as you can.”

Cohen said that law enforcement officials are adapting by expanding the process by which they identify threatening individuals before an attack and determining “whether someone who comes to the attention of law enforcement poses a threat of carrying out one of these attacks.”

“At the end of the day it is extraordinarily difficult to secure every soft target within a jurisdiction, so our success in reducing these types of attacks will only come when we’re better able to identify those within our communities who are potential attackers and prevent them from committing an act of violence,” Cohen said.

Preparing the public moving forward

The prospect of eliminating the public’s proximity to soft targets isn’t necessarily possible, and Cohen notes how politicians and local officials regularly encourage people to continue to live their daily lives normally after such an attack.

That kind of encouragement is a way of combatting the second impact of a terror attack, which is the fear that terrorism instills in people in an effort to change their ways.

Greenberg said that attacks on soft targets have “succeeded in a lot of ways” in that they replace the public’s sense of safety with one of fear.

“Since 9/11 in this country, since 7/7 in Britain, there’s a heightened sense of fear about going about daily life,” she said, referencing attacks in 2001 and 2005, respectively. “If one of the things they are attacking is peace of mind in our daily life, they can succeed in doing that. That’s the goal.”

Cohen said that people should “be aware but not afraid” of going to soft target areas, noting that they should be observant and alert law enforcement if they spot anything suspicious, as well as plan accordingly when going to large events, like concerts, because there may be increased security.

Greenberg urges people to adapt and evolve with the changing times.

“Terrorism is a problem that we have to manage, not a problem we can completely eradicate in foreseeable future, so every attack teaches us more ways to be vigilant,” Greenberg said. “I don’t think you have to tradeoff liberty for security. Good security allows people to live their lives.”

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