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NoahBryant/iStock/Thinkstock(TULSA, Okla.) — Tulsa Undersheriff Tim Albin has resigned, Sheriff Stanley Glanz announced on Monday, following the release of an internal investigation that showed Albin pressured employees to give special treatment to Reserve Deputy Robert Bates, the deputy who shot and killed Eric Harris when he says he mistook his firearm for his Taser.

“The last few weeks has been difficult for both the community and for the Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office,” Glanz said in a statement Monday. “As we look as a community for answers to the situation which put Mr. Bates and Mr. Harris on that fatal path, I have also looked inside the Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office organization to find what we could have done better and need to do differently.”

“As a result of my own examination,” Glanz added, “I believe it is time for a change in my leadership team.”

Glanz notes that “given the gravity of the current situation and the need to go a different direction with our leadership and management, [Albin] agrees with me that it is time for a change.”

Glanz also says that he will continue to examine the office, adding that more changes are coming.

The Tulsa World reports that Albin’s resignation will be effective at the end of the week.

Last week, the World reported that it had obtained a Sheriff’s Office memo regarding a special investigation into allegations of falsified documents and improper training for Robert Bates.

Bates is currently charged with second-degree manslaughter in Harris’ death.

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Hemera/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — NBA Playoffs – First Round: Milwaukee Bucks 94 – Chicago Bulls 88 (Bulls lead series, 3-2)

Brooklyn Nets 120 – Atlanta Hawks 115 (Series tied at 2-2)

NHL Playoffs – First Round: Washington Capitals 2 – New York Islanders 1 (Capitals win series, 4-3)

Tampa Bay Lightning 5 – Detroit Red Wings 2 (Series tied at 3-3)

MLB: Chicago Cubs 4 (11-7) – Pittsburgh Pirates 0 (11-9)

New York Mets 3 (15-5) – Miami Marlins 1 (8-12)

Cincinnati Reds 9 (9-10) – Milwaukee Brewers 6 (4-16)

New York Yankees 4 (12-8) – Tampa Bay Rays 1 (11-9)

Atlanta Braves 8 (10-9) – Washington Nationals 4 (7-13)

Boston Red Sox 6 (11-9) – Toronto Blue Jays 5 (9-11)

Kansas City Royals 6 (13-6) – Cleveland Indians 2 (6-12)

Philadelphia Phillies 4 (8-12) – St. Louis Cardinals 1 (12-6)

Chicago White Sox (8-9) @ Baltimore Orioles (9-10) (postponed)

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Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Newly sworn-in Attorney General Loretta Lynch on Monday night issued a statement calling the clashes between protesters and police in Baltimore “senseless acts of violence.”

“I condemn the senseless acts of violence by some individuals in Baltimore that have resulted in harm to law enforcement officers, destruction of property and a shattering of the peace in the city of Baltimore,” Lynch said in her statement. “Those who commit violent actions, ostensibly in protest of the death of Freddie Gray, do a disservice to his family, to his loved ones, and to legitimate peaceful protestors who are working to improve their community for all its residents.”

Earlier in the day, after being sworn in as the successor to outgoing Attorney General Eric Holder, Lynch briefed President Obama on the situation in Baltimore.

The Department of Justice is currently investigating Gray’s death.

Obama also spoke with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake about the situation, offering assistance as needed. White House Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett spoke with Maryland Governor Larry Hogan.

“As our investigative process continues,” Lynch concluded, “I strongly urge every member of the Baltimore community to adhere to the principles of nonviolence.”

Lynch also vowed to work with leaders in Baltimore to protect the “security and civil rights of all residence.” She also promised to “bring the full resources of the Department of Justice to bear in protecting those under threat, investigating wrongdoing, and securing an end to violence.”

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Rachelle and Chris Chapman with their new baby, Kaylee Rae. Rachelle Chapman(KNIGHTDALE, N.C.) — Rachelle Friedman Chapman was paralyzed when a bridesmaid playfully pushed her into a pool at her bachelorette party five years ago, causing irreversible damage to her spinal cord.

But now, thanks to a surrogate, she’s a new mom. Kaylee Rae Chapman was born at 10:48 a.m. Sunday, weighing 7 pounds, 11 ounces, Chapman told ABC News.

Even though Chapman knew the baby was on its way, because she wasn’t the one who was pregnant, the birth was a bit of a shock, Chapman told ABC News, adding that she’d been up since 4 a.m. “Then, all of the sudden, boom. There’s a baby.”

Chapman, 29, injured her sixth vertebrae in the accident in 2010, making her a quadriplegic. She said she still has the use of her shoulders and arms, but she lacks dexterity in her fingers. So, Chapman will be able to hold Kaylee, but changing her diapers and clothing her will be a learning experience.

“Not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when,” Chapman said.

Chapman met Laurel Humes, who carried Kaylee for nine months, back in 2004 at East Carolina University, where she also met her husband, Chris. The two clicked, but didn’t stay in touch.

Then, Humes saw Chapman’s blog post about wanting to have a baby through a surrogate because her spinal cord injury left her with low blood pressure. The blood pressure medication could hurt a developing fetus, but forgoing the medicine could be dangerous, too. Then, “out of the blue” Humes sent Chapman a message that she’d been thinking about surrogacy.

Humes lives a few hours away, but the Chapmans visited her for milestone doctors’ appointments, like hearing the baby’s heartbeat for the first time. On Sunday morning, she went into labor. Three hours later, Kaylee was born.

“Laurel did amazing and is resting after some hard work,” Chapman told her Facebook followers. “Thank you for the most beautiful gift we will ever receive!”

And Chapman said they wouldn’t have Kaylee without the organization Surrogacy Together, a group that works to make surrogate pregnancies more affordable, and donations from their GoFundMe page.

They will probably head home to Knightdale, North Carolina, on Tuesday, where Kaylee can meet her furry siblings, dogs Peedee and Roger.

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Rachelle and Chris Chapman with their new baby, Kaylee Rae. Rachelle Chapman(KNIGHTDALE, N.C.) — Rachelle Friedman Chapman was paralyzed when a bridesmaid playfully pushed her into a pool at her bachelorette party five years ago, causing irreversible damage to her spinal cord.

But now, thanks to a surrogate, she’s a new mom. Kaylee Rae Chapman was born at 10:48 a.m. Sunday, weighing 7 pounds, 11 ounces, Chapman told ABC News.

Even though Chapman knew the baby was on its way, because she wasn’t the one who was pregnant, the birth was a bit of a shock, Chapman told ABC News, adding that she’d been up since 4 a.m. “Then, all of the sudden, boom. There’s a baby.”

Chapman, 29, injured her sixth vertebrae in the accident in 2010, making her a quadriplegic. She said she still has the use of her shoulders and arms, but she lacks dexterity in her fingers. So, Chapman will be able to hold Kaylee, but changing her diapers and clothing her will be a learning experience.

“Not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when,” Chapman said.

Chapman met Laurel Humes, who carried Kaylee for nine months, back in 2004 at East Carolina University, where she also met her husband, Chris. The two clicked, but didn’t stay in touch.

Then, Humes saw Chapman’s blog post about wanting to have a baby through a surrogate because her spinal cord injury left her with low blood pressure. The blood pressure medication could hurt a developing fetus, but forgoing the medicine could be dangerous, too. Then, “out of the blue” Humes sent Chapman a message that she’d been thinking about surrogacy.

Humes lives a few hours away, but the Chapmans visited her for milestone doctors’ appointments, like hearing the baby’s heartbeat for the first time. On Sunday morning, she went into labor. Three hours later, Kaylee was born.

“Laurel did amazing and is resting after some hard work,” Chapman told her Facebook followers. “Thank you for the most beautiful gift we will ever receive!”

And Chapman said they wouldn’t have Kaylee without the organization Surrogacy Together, a group that works to make surrogate pregnancies more affordable, and donations from their GoFundMe page.

They will probably head home to Knightdale, North Carolina, on Tuesday, where Kaylee can meet her furry siblings, dogs Peedee and Roger.

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MARK BRAZIER/iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) — The first approved HIV self-test kit is on sale in the United Kingdom.

BBC News reports that the kits do not need to be sent to a lab for results; with a small drop of the patient’s blood, the kit can detect antibodies that signal the presence of HIV. The antibodies, BBC News notes, are only detectable three months after the infection is contracted.

Experts are asking for any positive tests using the kit to be confirmed at clinics.

Bio Sure UK, the company that produces the test kits, notes that up to 30 percent of people with HIV are undiagnosed, according to estimates. It adds that that group of undiagnosed individuals accounts for “at least two-thirds of all HIV transmission.”

The kits are meant to work similarly to a pregnancy test.

Bio Sure UK hopes that the ability for early diagnosis will allow those with HIV to get treatment quickly and prevent the more serious complications.

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MARK BRAZIER/iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) — The first approved HIV self-test kit is on sale in the United Kingdom.

BBC News reports that the kits do not need to be sent to a lab for results; with a small drop of the patient’s blood, the kit can detect antibodies that signal the presence of HIV. The antibodies, BBC News notes, are only detectable three months after the infection is contracted.

Experts are asking for any positive tests using the kit to be confirmed at clinics.

Bio Sure UK, the company that produces the test kits, notes that up to 30 percent of people with HIV are undiagnosed, according to estimates. It adds that that group of undiagnosed individuals accounts for “at least two-thirds of all HIV transmission.”

The kits are meant to work similarly to a pregnancy test.

Bio Sure UK hopes that the ability for early diagnosis will allow those with HIV to get treatment quickly and prevent the more serious complications.

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Alex_Schmidt/iStock/Thinkstock(SAN FRANCISCO) — A bartender and model is broadening her lawsuit against San Francisco transit police to include an Oakland cop after she says they used excessive force while booking her on St. Patrick’s Day last year and caused her to break at least four bones in her face.

Megan Sheehan acknowledges she was intoxicated and belligerent when she was apprehended at a Bay Area Rapid Transit station, but says officers left her with permanent physical damage after taking her to the nearby jail to charge her.

“I should have never gotten that drunk, but also there are ways to detain someone and not break their face,” she told ABC station KGO-TV.

The dramatic moment was caught on security cameras from inside the Santa Rita jail, as well as body cameras that were being worn by officers near Sheehan, showing how two officers appear to throw her to the ground right after she turned toward one of the officers and told him to stop touching her.

An audible thud can be heard as Sheehan hit the ground, and people standing near are heard gasping. An officer kneeling next to her after she hit the ground can be heard requesting medical help.

According to the lawsuit filed by Sheehan’s attorney last July, she suffered “serious head injuries including but not limited to fracturing four of her cheek bones, splitting her molar, and cracking a front tooth.”

The video shows Sheehan lying unconscious in a pool of blood as people near her, though it is unclear exactly who, say her name to try and get her to respond.

Sheehan, who is now 28 but was 27 at the time of the incident, did not remember anything of what happened on the night of the altercation, and it was only after her attorneys obtained video from inside the police station that they were able to determine how she broke the bones in her face.

“Finally, when we saw this last video we saw that, ‘Oh, she couldn’t put her hands out because they were being held behind her back,'” Liza de Vries, one of Sheehan’s attorneys, told ABC News Monday.

“She’s still recovering mentally from what happened. Physically she’s still having her teeth repaired. Her facial bones have recovered…though she can still feel that they were broken,” de Vries said.

The suit says that she spent two days being treated in a nearby hospital and never faced criminal charges.

De Vries told ABC News that they have an amendment hearing scheduled for the case on May 28 because they have now learned that in addition to a BART police officer there was also an Oakland police officer who was allegedly holding one of Sheehan’s arms behind her back when she was pushed to the ground. As a result, they will ask to have that officer and the Oakland police department added as defendants in the suit.

ABC News’ calls to BART police and the Oakland police department were not immediately returned. They told KGO they would not comment on the case because it is in active litigation, though attorneys for BART have denied liability in earlier court proceedings.

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Kentucky same-sex supporters pose, as pastor Rick Grogan from Fort Worth, TX, an opponent, seated, looks on. ABC News(WASHINGTON) — The scene outside the Supreme Court Monday felt a lot like a football game tailgate party — and for supporters and opponents of same-sex marriage who have spent days camped out to score a seat, Tuesday’s oral arguments are the Super Bowl.

The justices will hear arguments on two related questions: one, whether states must allow same-sex couples to marry; and two, whether states must recognize same-sex marriages performed elsewhere.

There were at least sixty groups — mainly supporters, but also some opponents — who had been waiting on the corner of First and East Capitol Streets for days, hoping for a coveted chair inside the courtroom.

Frank Colasonti Jr. and his husband James Ryder of Birmingham, Michigan, were among the first in line. They said they had been there since Friday evening, snoozing in sleeping bags and hiding under tarps when it rained. But the partners for 27 years, husbands for the last one, said this argument was too important not to try to attend.

“We really never thought …” Colasonti said before getting choked up.

“We really never thought we’d see it in our lifetime,” Ryder said, finishing his husband’s sentence.

“It really never seemed like an option that it would ever happen,” he continued, noting that they had filed their income taxes jointly for the first time this year.

The couple was among some 300 spouses who married on a single day in 2014 when Michigan’s gay marriage ban was temporarily lifted. Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder later said he would not contest the validity of those marriages, although the ban was reinstated.

Michigan is one of four states arguing in favor of their same-sex marriage bans. The others are Kentucky, Ohio and Tennessee.

Besides the many same-sex couples and their families who flocked from those states, there were many law students who wanted to see a case that future classes will likely study.

“However this is decided it’s going to be one of the most iconic and well-read cases in casebooks so this is going to be really exciting to be here,” Wyatt Fore, a third-year law student at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, said. He said he had been in place, lawn chair and law books in tow, since Friday night.

Emotions and opinions on both sides of Tuesday’s arguments run high, but at this unique gathering of legal minds, students, same-sex couples and pastors, the tendency is to live and let live — or in this case, wait and let wait.

Pastor Rick Grogan of Fort Worth, Texas, acknowledged that he was one of the few opponents of same-sex marriage camped out, a buoy in a sea of Human Rights Campaign banners and rainbow flags.

“You’ve got, what, 20-something states who have banned it in their constitution. Now, nine people are going to tell the whole nation what to do,” he said, sprawled on a blanket with an opened Bible in his hand.

But he said the discourse among his neighbors had been respectful. After all, if people toss footballs around during a pregame tailgate, why wouldn’t they engage in elevated debate before a Supreme Court argument?

“Even though people disagree, it’s been pleasant so far,” Grogan said.

As he spoke, a group of same-sex marriage supporters from Kentucky posed for a group picture, just steps away.

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Earl Leaf/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Jayne Meadows has died, her agent confirmed to ABC News. She was 95.

Meadows, who was married to TV legend Steve Allen from 1954 until his death in 2000, was born in China and moved to Connecticut with her missionary parents as a child. As a teenager, she developed a love of theater and made a name for herself in a local company as “the redhead with the loud voice,” she once told Emmy TV Legends.

Meadows went on to earn three Emmy nominations for her work on Meeting of Minds, St. Elsewhere and High Society. However, her favorite time professionally were the years she spent with her husband as a celebrity panelist on I’ve Got a Secret.

“That was a period in New York, where everybody I worked with, they were our best friends and I would do the show at night and the next day I’d be leaving the apartment…and the cab drivers [would yell], ‘Jayney! Great show last night! How’s Steve-o? How’s the baby?'” she told Emmy TV Legends. “It was the medium that came into your living room. Every living room…they knew you as a friend.”

Her work in TV was varied — from appearances on What’s My Line? and Hollywood Squares to The Honeymooners alongside her sister, Audrey Meadows. She also appeared on Broadway in Spring Again, The Gazebo, and Once In a Lifetime, and in films including Undercurrent and Lady in the Lake.

Meadows is survived by her son, Bill Allen.

“She was the most loving mother and grandmother I could ever imagine,” he told Entertainment Tonight. “Seeing only the best in all her family members and giving us all confidence that we had value to offer the world and should take risks because we could do no wrong in her eyes.”

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