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Kevin Lynch/Lifetime(NEW YORK) — After Susan Sarandon broke up with her much younger boyfriend, Jonathan Bricklin, back in March, she’s been slowly making her way back into the dating pool. On Friday’s The View, the actress detailed what she’s looking for in a future partner.

“I’m not actively looking, but if there’s a person I would leave open the age, the color, the gender even. I’m open,” she said. “Well, it increases your chances doesn’t it?”

The Oscar winner added that she’s look for “somebody who is not gonna find it difficult to be with me and people come up to me and say, ‘Oh I love your work.’ That won’t turn out to be a problem. Someone who is passionate about what they do and they love what they do. …Someone who’s open and adventurous and can travel and has a lot of fun; spiritual, doesn’t have to have a religion exactly.”

Sarandon, 68, and Bricklin, 37, started dating after she ended a 21-year relationship with actor Tim Robbins.

Sarandon is set to portray Marilyn Monroe’s mother, Gladys, in the Lifetime movie The Secret Life of Marilyn Monroe, which premieres Saturday at 8 p.m. Eastern.

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Creatas/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) – The man who created and operated the “Silk Road” website that was used to traffic more than $200 million in illegal drugs and other goods and services was sentenced to life in prison Friday in New York.

Ross Ulbricht, known to some as “Dread Pirate Roberts,” was sentenced to life for owning and operating what was known as Silk Road, a hidden website for anonymously buying and selling illegal goods. Ulbricht was found guilty on all seven charges filed against him, including distributing narcotics by means of the internet.

“Ulbricht was a drug dealer and criminal profiteer who exploited people’s addictions and contributed to the deaths of at least six young people,” Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement. “Ulbricht went from hiding his cybercrime identity to becoming the face of cybercrime”

According to court documents, Ulbricht, 31, created Silk Road in January 2011 and operated the site until it was shut down in October 2013. During that time, Silk Road was used by over 100,000 people to buy drugs and other illegal goods.

The identities and computer locations of Silk Road users were hidden — routed through computers around the world using a system called ‘Tor’ that hides IP addresses. Categories for goods and services on the site included “cannabis,” “opioids,” “psychedelics” and “dissociatives.” Purchases were paid for with bitcoins, which are untraceable.

Narcotics sales on the site contributed to at least six overdose deaths, charging documents said.

The court found that Ulbricht raked in roughly $13 million in commissions running site. In addition to his life sentence, Ulbricht has been ordered to pay over $183 million.

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Alex_Schmidt/iStock/Thinkstock(DENVER) – Police in Northern Colorado say two fatal traffic shootings in the area now appear to be connected, based on their investigation.

Cori Romero was shot as drove onto the freeway in Fort Collins on April 22nd. Then on May 18th, John Jacoby was shot dead as he was riding his bicycle on a county road in Windsor at around 10 am.

The FBI is joining local authorities to investigate the two shootings, which appear to be random.

Since April, there have been at least nine reports of car windows shattering while drivers were on the interstate in the area, ABC’s Denver affiliate KMGH-TV reports.

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Alex_Schmidt/iStock/Thinkstock(DENVER) – Police in Northern Colorado say two fatal traffic shootings in the area now appear to be connected, based on their investigation.

Cori Romero was shot as drove onto the freeway in Fort Collins on April 22nd. Then on May 18th, John Jacoby was shot dead as he was riding his bicycle on a county road in Windsor at around 10 am.

The FBI is joining local authorities to investigate the two shootings, which appear to be random.

Since April, there have been at least nine reports of car windows shattering while drivers were on the interstate in the area, ABC’s Denver affiliate KMGH-TV reports.

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Meliha Gojak/iStock/Thinkstock(LIVERPOOL, England) – A UK student has worked online readers into a lather, after writing about her refusal to shave her body hair and perpetuate what she described as “unfair expectations of women.”

In an essay that appeared in the The Tab Liverpool, titled, “I Don’t Shave and I’m Not Going To Start,” Yasmin Gasimova wrote that since having stopped shaving at the age of 11, she has endured much criticism from acquaintances and schoolmates. But she remained staunchly opposed to the notion that she should alter her natural appearance to suit societal norms.

“As someone of Turkic origin, I don’t remember ever not having hair,” Gasimova, now 19 and a computer science student at the University of Liverpool, wrote. “In fact, as early as 10, boys were making fun of my moustache and I was trying to shave my noticeably hairy stomach.”

But a year later, the author decided that shaving her abdomen and legs wasn’t worth the inconvenience it caused her, so she stopped. After a period of pushback from friends, family and boyfriends, Gasimova wrote that most people close to her eventually agreed with her personal stance.

Some commenters offered support of her position on not shaving, cheering:

“Good on you for be comfortable with your hair!”

Others asserted their dislike of female body hair.

“I’d hope the Author of this article is aware that many guys don’t like body hair on women and that she’s tough enough to take the, regrettably inevitable, abuse she’s getting,” wrote one reader.

Gasimova disagreed, she wrote:

“If you think the au naturel look is gross, it isn’t – you only believe that because you’ve been conditioned to see it that way your entire life,” wrote Gasimova. “I dream of the day I can walk around in the summer in shorts, without being conscious of people judging me. It will, however, take many of my sisters joining me and ridding the public of the shock.”

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YelenaYemchuk/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Americans consume more sugar than anyone else in the world.

The World Health Organization has long called for adults and children to reduce their sugar intake to roughly 50 grams (12 teaspoons) or less a day. But recent recommendations suggest limiting sugar intake even further to less than five percent of total calories—half of the original recommendation.

Cutting back on sugar consumption can be more than just good for a waistline, it can also reduce tooth decay and prevent diabetes in the long run, Harvard researchers say.

Still, Kristin Kirkpatrick, a registered dietician at the Cleveland Clinic says replacing sugar with artificial sweeteners can actually cause more harm.

“You’re still giving your taste buds the sugar that it’s craving and artificial sweeteners tend to be a lot sweeter than actual, real sugar,” Kirkpatrick says.

She suggests it’s better to just cut sugar out of your diet — quell cravings with nuts or a piece of fruit instead. Getting more sleep is helpful too: it’s even harder for sleepy people to cut back on sweets because of the effect of sleeplessness on the brain. Getting more fiber can also help you feel full.

“What I tell my patients on day one of meeting them is, ‘If you see sugar in the first five ingredients of any food product in your pantry, put it in the trash.'”

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An undated booking photo of Otis Byrd, 54. Mississippi Parole Board(WASHINGTON) — The Department of Justice said Friday that it would not pursue federal criminal civil rights charges in the death of Otis Byrd, a Mississippi man who was discovered hanging from a tree in March.

The body of Byrd, 54, was found in Port Gibson, Mississippi on March 19. Justice Department investigators, along with state and local officials, conducted an investigation into the circumstances of Byrd’s death in the hopes of determining whether it was the result of homicide.

“Under the applicable federal criminal civil rights statute, prosecutors must establish, beyond a reasonable doubt, that an individual willfully caused bodily injury because of the victim’s actual or perceived race, color, religion, national origin, gender, gender identity or disability,” the DOJ explains in a statement.

“After a careful and thorough review, a team of experienced federal prosecutors and FBI agents determined that there was no evidence to prove that Byrd’s death was a homicide,” the DOJ added, saying that it had closed its investigation into Byrd’s death.

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Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Certain provisions of the Patriot Act, including those the National Security Agency uses for the controversial bulk collection of Americans’ phone records, will expire when the clock strikes midnight on June 1 if Congress can’t reach an agreement about the future of the program.

Lawmakers are at odds over whether and how the controversial practice should continue, and with the expiration deadline approaching, the White House has warned of the national security impact shuttering the program will have, potentially cause law enforcement officials to lose important tools to help them track down and prosecute suspected terrorists unless legislation is passed.

The fate of the program will unfold on the Senate floor Sunday afternoon. Here’s what you need to know about the debate over the NSA and the Patriot Act.

WHAT EXACTLY IS EXPIRING?

Several provisions of the Patriot Act will expire at midnight on June 1st. The one you’ve probably heard about the most is Section 215, which provides the authority for the NSA’s bulk collection of Americans’ phone records. That’s the controversial program first exposed by NSA contractor Edward Snowden in 2013. This allows the NSA to access telephone metadata — basically information about where, when and to whom calls were made, but not recordings of the calls themselves.

It also includes a provision that allows prosecutors to collect other information, like business records, on suspected terrorists by acquiring a court order. Section 215 is used in terrorism cases about 200 times a year, according to senior administration officials.

But there are two other, lesser-known programs that also face the June 1st expiration deadline. One allows law enforcement officials to use roving wiretaps to monitor individuals using different phones, a power that is exercised less than 100 times a year. The other is the so-called “Lone Wolf” provision which allows officials to monitor a suspected terrorist even if they can’t establish any ties to a known terrorist organization. While this power has never been used, senior administration officials say it could be valuable in the future in detecting people planning terror attacks as lone wolves.

WHAT IS CONGRESS FIGHTING ABOUT?

There are several camps involved in the fight over the Patriot Act. There are those – like Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senator Richard Burr – who wanted to extend the program without any changes.

Then there are the supporters of the USA Freedom Act, which passed the House of Representatives with a vote of 303-121, and has support from lawmakers like Sens. Patrick Leahy, ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Mike Lee, R-Utah. That measure would end the government’s collection of the metadata and instead have the telephone companies store the records. The NSA would have to obtain a warrant from the U.S. Foreign Intelligence courts in order to query the information from the database.

Finally, there are those like Sen. Rand Paul, R-Kentucky, who want to end the collection of phone records completely and allow the provisions to run out. Paul even spoke on the Senate floor for ten and a half hours protesting the Patriot Act, and a super PAC supporting Paul, America’s Liberty, has released a web ad teeing up Paul’s upcoming stand against the NSA on Sunday.

WAIT, THERE’S A WRESTLING MATCH IN THE SENATE SUNDAY?

No – but the fate of the program NSA’s domestic surveillance program could be determined on Sunday.

Here’s where things stand: While the Republican controlled House passed the USA Freedom Act earlier this month, it faced opposition as soon as it arrived in the Senate, especially as the upper chamber’s top Republican leader, Senator Mitch McConnell, pushed his colleagues for a blank extension of the surveillance program.

With Memorial Day recess looming, the Senate voted on the USA Freedom Act in the early morning hours last Saturday, but fell three votes short of clearing a key procedural hurdle. Shortly after some political theatrics on the Senate floor, the upper chamber voted to block a two month extension of the Patriot Act to give lawmakers time to hammer out a compromise.

The Senate then adjourned for the week and senators are slated to return at 4:00 p.m. Sunday, with only eight hours left until the program expires.

SO THE PROGRAM MAY END AT MIDNIGHT ON JUNE 1?

Actually, the process to end the program starts much earlier than midnight, according to senior administration officials The NSA will begin shutting down the surveillance system at 4:00 p.m. on Sunday if Congress has not passed legislation by then.

The NSA then has until 8:00 p.m. to cancel the shutdown. At that point, it is irreversible. Once the database is shut down, it would take an entire day to restart the system. No additional metadata could be collected while the system is down nor would law enforcement officials be able to search the database.

Lawmakers are in negotiations to find an agreement before the Senate returns on Sunday, but unless the Senate passes legislation by 8:00 p.m. on Sunday, the surveillance program is expected to go dark for at least a few days, which President Obama has warned lawmakers about.

“The House of Representatives did its work which strikes the appropriate balance,” Obama said this week. “The Senate did not act…I strongly urge the Senate to work through this recess and make sure that they identify a way to get this done.”

“This needs to get done,” he added.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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Photo by Adam Berry/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Certain provisions of the Patriot Act, including those the National Security Agency uses for the controversial bulk collection of Americans’ phone records, will expire when the clock strikes midnight on June 1 if Congress can’t reach an agreement about the future of the program.

Lawmakers are at odds over whether and how the controversial practice should continue, and with the expiration deadline approaching, the White House has warned of the national security impact shuttering the program will have, potentially cause law enforcement officials to lose important tools to help them track down and prosecute suspected terrorists unless legislation is passed.

The fate of the program will unfold on the Senate floor Sunday afternoon. Here’s what you need to know about the debate over the NSA and the Patriot Act.

WHAT EXACTLY IS EXPIRING?

Several provisions of the Patriot Act will expire at midnight on June 1st. The one you’ve probably heard about the most is Section 215, which provides the authority for the NSA’s bulk collection of Americans’ phone records. That’s the controversial program first exposed by NSA contractor Edward Snowden in 2013. This allows the NSA to access telephone metadata — basically information about where, when and to whom calls were made, but not recordings of the calls themselves.

It also includes a provision that allows prosecutors to collect other information, like business records, on suspected terrorists by acquiring a court order. Section 215 is used in terrorism cases about 200 times a year, according to senior administration officials.

But there are two other, lesser-known programs that also face the June 1st expiration deadline. One allows law enforcement officials to use roving wiretaps to monitor individuals using different phones, a power that is exercised less than 100 times a year. The other is the so-called “Lone Wolf” provision which allows officials to monitor a suspected terrorist even if they can’t establish any ties to a known terrorist organization. While this power has never been used, senior administration officials say it could be valuable in the future in detecting people planning terror attacks as lone wolves.

WHAT IS CONGRESS FIGHTING ABOUT?

There are several camps involved in the fight over the Patriot Act. There are those – like Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senator Richard Burr – who wanted to extend the program without any changes.

Then there are the supporters of the USA Freedom Act, which passed the House of Representatives with a vote of 303-121, and has support from lawmakers like Sens. Patrick Leahy, ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Ted Cruz, R-Texas, and Mike Lee, R-Utah. That measure would end the government’s collection of the metadata and instead have the telephone companies store the records. The NSA would have to obtain a warrant from the U.S. Foreign Intelligence courts in order to query the information from the database.

Finally, there are those like Sen. Rand Paul, R-Kentucky, who want to end the collection of phone records completely and allow the provisions to run out. Paul even spoke on the Senate floor for ten and a half hours protesting the Patriot Act, and a super PAC supporting Paul, America’s Liberty, has released a web ad teeing up Paul’s upcoming stand against the NSA on Sunday.

WAIT, THERE’S A WRESTLING MATCH IN THE SENATE SUNDAY?

No – but the fate of the program NSA’s domestic surveillance program could be determined on Sunday.

Here’s where things stand: While the Republican controlled House passed the USA Freedom Act earlier this month, it faced opposition as soon as it arrived in the Senate, especially as the upper chamber’s top Republican leader, Senator Mitch McConnell, pushed his colleagues for a blank extension of the surveillance program.

With Memorial Day recess looming, the Senate voted on the USA Freedom Act in the early morning hours last Saturday, but fell three votes short of clearing a key procedural hurdle. Shortly after some political theatrics on the Senate floor, the upper chamber voted to block a two month extension of the Patriot Act to give lawmakers time to hammer out a compromise.

The Senate then adjourned for the week and senators are slated to return at 4:00 p.m. Sunday, with only eight hours left until the program expires.

SO THE PROGRAM MAY END AT MIDNIGHT ON JUNE 1?

Actually, the process to end the program starts much earlier than midnight, according to senior administration officials The NSA will begin shutting down the surveillance system at 4:00 p.m. on Sunday if Congress has not passed legislation by then.

The NSA then has until 8:00 p.m. to cancel the shutdown. At that point, it is irreversible. Once the database is shut down, it would take an entire day to restart the system. No additional metadata could be collected while the system is down nor would law enforcement officials be able to search the database.

Lawmakers are in negotiations to find an agreement before the Senate returns on Sunday, but unless the Senate passes legislation by 8:00 p.m. on Sunday, the surveillance program is expected to go dark for at least a few days, which President Obama has warned lawmakers about.

“The House of Representatives did its work which strikes the appropriate balance,” Obama said this week. “The Senate did not act…I strongly urge the Senate to work through this recess and make sure that they identify a way to get this done.”

“This needs to get done,” he added.

Copyright © 2015, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

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ABC/Adam Taylor(NEW YORK) – When Rumer Willis took home the mirror ball trophy on Dancing with the Stars earlier this month, a lot was said about her dance moves.

But after she shared a photo of herself in a bikini on Instagram, talk has begun to focus on the singer’s figure.

“I pretty much eat the same things. I mean French fries is [sic] a very large part of my diet,” she told E! News. “But honestly, that’s just one of the reasons why I like dancing. I don’t like standing on a treadmill”

Val Chmerkovskiy, who was partnered with Willis, 26, on the ABC reality TV show teased her that she needs to run on the treadmill to get a real workout. She laughed off the joke, and continued that she prefers exercises that “actually serve a purpose.”

“To me, running on a treadmill, that seems so monotonous and I’m not working toward anything,” she said. “At least when I was dancing, I felt like, I’m doing something that’s going to give me something back. It’s not just for the sole purpose of trying to make my body look a certain way.”

After a moment and laughed: “I think I still have it right now, so I’m probably just taking it for granted.”

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