Review Category : Uncategorized

IndyCar Driver Justin Wilson Dies After Crash at Pocono Raceway

Photo by Robert Laberge/Getty Images(LONG POND, Pa.) — IndyCar driver Justin Wilson has died after being hit by a piece of debris following a multi-car crash.

A statement on behalf of the Wilson family read Monday night by Mark Miles, CEO, Hulman & Co., parent of IndyCar and Indianapolis Motor Speedway said as a result of head injury sustained Monday night, Wilson passed away in the company of his family.

According to ESPN.com, Sage Karam spun into the wall and a piece of his car struck Wilson in the head. Wilson’s car then veered to the left and crashed into an interior wall.

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Florida State Running Back Dalvin Cook Found Not Guilty in Battery Case

Stacy Revere/Getty Images(TALLAHASSEE, Fla.) — Florida State’s Dalvin Cook has been found not guilty of a misdemeanor battery charge.

According to ESPN, Florida State University running back Dalvin Cook was found not guilty of misdemeanor battery on Monday after he was accused by a woman of punching her in the face outside of a bar in June.

Cook had denied any involvement or wrongdoing and was suspended pending outcome from the trial. 

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Track Star Justin Gatlin Calls Out Heckler in the Stands Bothering His Mother

Ian Walton/Getty Images(BEIJING) — Don’t talk trash to this track star’s mother.

After finishing second at the World Championships for the 100-meter event, track star Justin Gatlin noticed someone in the stands heckling his mother while he received his silver medal on the podium.

According to ESPN‘s Jim Caple, singled out the heckler while he was at the podium and said “chill out, be a gentleman.”

Gatlin finished second to Usain Bolt in the 100-meter event, but not by much.

The track star has received heavy criticism since returning from a two-year suspension for using performance enhancing drugs, something he had been suspended before for.

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Old Dominion University Fraternity Suspends Activities After Suggestive Banners

iStock/Thinkstock(NORFOLK, Va.) — Just in time for back-to-school.

According to ABC News affiliate WVEC-TV, the Sigma Nu Fraternity has suspended chapter activities after hanging up suggestive banners on their off-campus house on Friday.

One of the banners said, “FRESHMAN DAUGHTER DROP OFF,” and another said, “GO AHEAD AND DROP OFF MOM TOO…”

ODU Vice President of Student Engagement and Enrollment Services Ellen Neufeldt said those who were responsible would be penalized.

“Student organizations and our students are subject to our code of conduct and due process. We take that very seriously,” Neufeldt said. “Any student that’s found to have violated our code will be held accountable with disciplinary action.”

A letter from ODU President John Broderick sent Saturday said, “I am outraged about the offensive message directed toward women that was visible for a time on 43rd Street. Our students, campus community and alumni have been offended.

“While we constantly educate students, faculty and staff about sexual assault and sexual harassment, this incident confirms our collective efforts are still failing to register with some.”

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New Alzheimer’s Disease Report Out for 2015

iStock/Thinkstock(LONDON) — A new report on Alzheimer’s disease reveals the global reach of dementia and Alzheimer Disease is larger than previously estimated.

The World Alzheimer Report for 2015 from Alzheimer’s Disease International says an estimated 46.8 million people worldwide suffer from dementia and by 2030, this figure will reach 74.7 million and continue to double every 20 years.

“The report shows that the current annual societal and economic cost of dementia is US $818 billion, and it is expected to become a trillion dollar disease in just three years’ time,” said a statement on Alzheimer’s Disease International’s website. “The findings show that the cost of dementia has increased by 35% since the 2010 World Alzheimer Report estimate of US $604 billion.”

According to the Alzheimer Association, Alzheimer Disease is the most common cause of dementia, accounting for 60-80 percent of all cases of dementia in the United States.

Why are we seeing more cases of dementia now? 

As treatments and outcomes for other diseases like cancer, heart disease, and stroke improve and become available to developing countries, more people are living to the age where dementia and Alzheimer Dementia become more common. 

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Jennifer Hudson Says She’s ‘Very Nervous’ About Starring in “The Color Purple”

Heather Wines/CBS(NEW YORK) — Jennifer Hudson is preparing to play Shug Avery in the Broadway production of The Color Purple. And although the actress already has an Oscar, she’s nervous to take the stage.

Hudson told People magazine she’s “very nervous” to make her Broadway debut. “I try to feel the butterflies before any big performance as much as I can,” the actress added. “That sensation makes me feel alive and it keeps me on my toes. For me, nerves have always been a good thing, they make the experience exciting.”

Still, Hudson shouldn’t be that nervous, especially since she’s very familiar with Alice Walker’s book and the original Broadway adaptation.  She said the tale is “a timeless piece of American culture. The story holds a special place in my heart because, in part, it’s so honest. All of the characters are true to who they are. Each individual is an integral part of the message and it brings a complex emotion that sticks with the audience.”

The Color Purple, which also stars Orange Is the New Black‘s Danielle Brooks as Sofia, will begin previews November 10 at the Bernard B. Jacobs Theatre in New York City.

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French Train Attack a Reminder of US Railroad Vulnerability

Scott Olson/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Days after three Americans subdued an AK-47-wielding gunman on a Paris-bound commuter train, Amtrak, one of America’s largest passenger rail companies, is reassuring travelers in the states that the carrier is taking security seriously.

“Amtrak has implemented a number of security initiatives to improve safety and security for our employees and passengers,” the company said in a statement. “Efforts include the use of explosive detection K-9 teams, passenger and baggage screenings, and strong partnerships with local, state, federal and international agencies – including active participation in FBI Joint Terrorism Task Forces – to share intelligence and conduct joint security exercises.”

The security initiatives are ongoing and not in reaction to Friday’s attack, the partially government-funded railroad said.

But the reality is that, like airlines, U.S. railroads remain vulnerable to terrorist attacks, experts say.

Despite a significant investment in rail security following the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007, some lawmakers have complained that the country remains overly focused on aviation safety – and that train attacks in Madrid, Mumbai and London prove that passenger rail can be a terrorist target.

“The increased security efforts around air travel have led to concerns that terrorists may turn their attention to ‘softer’ targets, such as transit or passenger rail,” a March 2015 report from the Congressional Research Service reads.

“A key challenge Congress faces is balancing the desire for increased rail passenger security with the efficient functioning of transit systems.”

If you’re a regular rail customer, you’ve probably noticed that train stations lack the magnetometers and body scanners used at airport terminals to detect guns and knives.

With rail passengers coming and going rapidly throughout the day, establishing airport-style security protocols at train stations “would essentially make rail travel extraordinarily difficult if not impossible,” said John Cohen, a former U.S. counterterrorism official and ABC News contributor.

Added ABC News contributor and former FBI agent Brad Garrett: “The idea that you could screen all of those people is not realistic.”

Instead, rail security teams are focused on gathering intelligence to protect critical stations, tunnels, and bridges and maintaining highly visible deterrence teams, including a robust uniformed police presence.

Amtrak retains its own police force with over 500 personnel, including canine units that “provide a psychological and physical deterrent to potential threats,” plus two analysts with top secret security clearance who routinely sit in on classified briefings with federal officials and coordinate VIP movements, according to the Amtrak Police Department.

And armed Amtrak security personnel perform random luggage searches at bustling hubs like Washington’s Union Station or New York’s Penn Station.

The TSA – best known for its work in airport security – sometimes joins Amtrak and local police on security sweeps. Established partly in response to the 2004 Madrid train attack, the TSA’s VIPR (Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response) squads — made up of behavior detection officers, security investigators and explosive experts — work with officials to monitor stations and prevent attacks.

And yet, “notwithstanding all that we do from a rail security prospective,” Cohen said, “chances are that if someone wanted to get on a train with a firearm and begin shooting people, there’s a pretty good chance that they would be able to do it.”

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French Train Attack a Reminder of US Railroad Vulnerability

Scott Olson/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — Days after three Americans subdued an AK-47-wielding gunman on a Paris-bound commuter train, Amtrak, one of America’s largest passenger rail companies, is reassuring travelers in the states that the carrier is taking security seriously.

“Amtrak has implemented a number of security initiatives to improve safety and security for our employees and passengers,” the company said in a statement. “Efforts include the use of explosive detection K-9 teams, passenger and baggage screenings, and strong partnerships with local, state, federal and international agencies – including active participation in FBI Joint Terrorism Task Forces – to share intelligence and conduct joint security exercises.”

The security initiatives are ongoing and not in reaction to Friday’s attack, the partially government-funded railroad said.

But the reality is that, like airlines, U.S. railroads remain vulnerable to terrorist attacks, experts say.

Despite a significant investment in rail security following the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007, some lawmakers have complained that the country remains overly focused on aviation safety – and that train attacks in Madrid, Mumbai and London prove that passenger rail can be a terrorist target.

“The increased security efforts around air travel have led to concerns that terrorists may turn their attention to ‘softer’ targets, such as transit or passenger rail,” a March 2015 report from the Congressional Research Service reads.

“A key challenge Congress faces is balancing the desire for increased rail passenger security with the efficient functioning of transit systems.”

If you’re a regular rail customer, you’ve probably noticed that train stations lack the magnetometers and body scanners used at airport terminals to detect guns and knives.

With rail passengers coming and going rapidly throughout the day, establishing airport-style security protocols at train stations “would essentially make rail travel extraordinarily difficult if not impossible,” said John Cohen, a former U.S. counterterrorism official and ABC News contributor.

Added ABC News contributor and former FBI agent Brad Garrett: “The idea that you could screen all of those people is not realistic.”

Instead, rail security teams are focused on gathering intelligence to protect critical stations, tunnels, and bridges and maintaining highly visible deterrence teams, including a robust uniformed police presence.

Amtrak retains its own police force with over 500 personnel, including canine units that “provide a psychological and physical deterrent to potential threats,” plus two analysts with top secret security clearance who routinely sit in on classified briefings with federal officials and coordinate VIP movements, according to the Amtrak Police Department.

And armed Amtrak security personnel perform random luggage searches at bustling hubs like Washington’s Union Station or New York’s Penn Station.

The TSA – best known for its work in airport security – sometimes joins Amtrak and local police on security sweeps. Established partly in response to the 2004 Madrid train attack, the TSA’s VIPR (Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response) squads — made up of behavior detection officers, security investigators and explosive experts — work with officials to monitor stations and prevent attacks.

And yet, “notwithstanding all that we do from a rail security prospective,” Cohen said, “chances are that if someone wanted to get on a train with a firearm and begin shooting people, there’s a pretty good chance that they would be able to do it.”

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Last Reported Ebola Patient in Sierra Leone Released

iStock/Thinkstock(MAKENI, Sierra Leone) — The last known Ebola patient in Sierra Leone has been released.

According to BBC, the 35-year-old patient, Adama Sankoh, was released Monday morning from a northern Bombali district treatment center.

The release comes 15 months after the original outbreak was reported in Sierra Leone. Nearly 4,000 people have died in the country since then.

Although the patient has been released, the outbreak isn’t over yet.

Sierra Leone still has 28 people in quarantine and the outbreak cannot be declared over until 42 days, two times the incubation period of the virus, after the last known patient dies or is discharged.

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Report: Rosie O’Donnell’s Father Passes Away

Lou Rocco/ABC(NEW YORK) — The bad news continues for Rosie O’Donnell.  E! News reports that her father, Edward Joseph O’Donnell, lost his fight with cancer. He was 81.

The former View co-host has been open about her strained relationship with her dad. 

“He had his own issues and demons, he had a very tough childhood, he had an alcoholic, abusive father and never really got the help that I think every person needs when they have lived through that as a child,” she told Piers Morgan in 2012. “I think that he had a lot of problems to deal with. No matter what, at the end of the day, every child loves their dad.”

The news comes days after the comedian reported her 17-year-old daughter Chelsea missing in New York. The teen was safe and sound at the New Jersey home of 25-year-old Steven M. Sheerer.  However, Sheerer was later arrested for charges of distribution of obscenity to a minor and endangering the welfare of a child. Sheerer faces up to 10 years in prison if convicted of both charges.

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